Year 2000 Gibson R9 nut replacement

Lull

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Hi All,

I've been reading this forum for quite a while now, without much to contribute... sadly enough my first post will be a request for help.

I'm contemplating the idea of having the Corian nut on my Y2K Gibson R9 replaced with a nylon nut, similar to the one on my 2013 R7. I've read that removing the Corian nut on Gibson guitars can be quite involved due to the amount of glue they use to keep it in place. Does any of you have experience with replacing the nut on a year ~2000 historic? I admit being a bit worried at the idea of getting the finish or fretboard chipped near the Corian nut if it proves difficult to take out.

Thanks in advance for any input!
 

Subterfuge

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look it up on YouTube, there are a few videos on this topic ... scary stuff
 

Lull

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I did! And this is exactly what scared me... I stumbled across the video of a guy replacing a nut on an SG and he basically had to saw it in thin layers in order to take it out.
 
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charlie chitlins

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I haven't done a 2000 Historic, specifically, but many are tricky being they're lacquered over and squeezed between the headstock overlay and fretboard.
Some just walk out the side.
If they're glued in securely I cut down the middle (across) with a hacksaw and squeeze the sides together with fret nippers.
Of course, you need to score all around with a blade.
I wouldn't do it unless the nut is worn or otherwise compromised.
It's just not worth it.
 

Lull

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Thanks for the answer! The Corian nut on the R9 is fine and well cut; it's just not as "slippery" as the nylon nut on my 2013 (I don't have a better term in mind). I'll just keep on using Nut Sauce from time to time.
 

rockinlespaul

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Interesting. This may explain the way mine looks on my 2000 R8. It's like a shim(maybe remnants of the original nut)under the nut.... strange.
 

RAG7890

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Get a Luthier to do it. I'd also suggest looking at using Tusq Nuts because Nylon is not the be all & end all that many think it is.

:cheers2:
 

Lull

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Get a Luthier to do it. I'd also suggest looking at using Tusq Nuts because Nylon is not the be all & end all that many think it is.

:cheers2:
Yes good point; I'll look at the Tusq XL nut as well. Thanks!
 

charlie chitlins

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If you need nut lube to stay in tune, the slots need work. If you ever hear a "dink" when tuning, it won't stay in tune.
 

Lull

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If you need nut lube to stay in tune, the slots need work. If you ever hear a "dink" when tuning, it won't stay in tune.
I did have the nut adjusted a while ago when I switched to 11-49 string gauge. The string never "ping" in the nut per se, but it seems I have to adjust tuning a bit more often on the R9 compared to the 2013 R7 which has the nylon nut. Thinking of it, the tuners being almost 15 years older on the R9 probably have a more significant impact on tuning stability.

Thank you for taking the time to answer; I really appreciate your input.
 

charlie chitlins

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Unlikely it's the tuners...even if they have wear/lash.
Sometimes angling the very the rear of the nut slot toward the tuner can help tuning stability.
I've been rubbing a pencil across the slots for 30+ years.
Sometimes I don't bother, and it's just the same.
Then I go back to doing it anyway.
Such is the nature of habit, I guess.
One of these days I'm going to try angling all the slots toward the tuners to see what happens.
 

Sct13

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A brass drift and a nut driver, line it up and whack it gently it should slide right out. Must be straight or you could ruin the holly headstock Vernier. Also before you start use an exacto blade to trace out and cut and extra glue or finish around it. especially where the black meets the nut.
 

Lull

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I've been rubbing a pencil across the slots for 30+ years.
Sometimes I don't bother, and it's just the same.
Then I go back to doing it anyway.
Such is the nature of habit, I guess.
Same here, part of my string change routine. I used to rub soap in the nut slots, and then "upgraded" to Big Bends Nut Sauce for the convenience of the tube dispenser...

Sometimes angling the very the rear of the nut slot toward the tuner can help tuning stability.
I've always had the feeling that tuning stability on my Les Paul guitars was partially impaired by the downwards pressure of the strings in the nut slots due to the rather steep headstock angle, rather than mechanical friction on the side walls of the slots. Maybe next time I change the strings I'll try to wind them so that the strings leave the tuner post at the top rather than at the bottom to slightly reduce the angle at which the strings meet the nut at the fretboard. I admit the improvement, if any, would probably be marginal at best... We'll see.
 
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korus

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Hi All,

I've been reading this forum for quite a while now, without much to contribute... sadly enough my first post will be a request for help.

I'm contemplating the idea of having the Corian nut on my Y2K Gibson R9 replaced with a nylon nut, similar to the one on my 2013 R7. I've read that removing the Corian nut on Gibson guitars can be quite involved due to the amount of glue they use to keep it in place. Does any of you have experience with replacing the nut on a year ~2000 historic? I admit being a bit worried at the idea of getting the finish or fretboard chipped near the Corian nut if it proves difficult to take out.

Thanks in advance for any input!
First of all, you are indeed at the right place.

Nylon nut is the important element of the original design. Strings do not bind and it helps shaping every tone played, both open and fretted.

And here is the only answer you actually need:
http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-53200-19255-0/1?icep_ff3=2&toolid=10001&campid=5338014323&icep_item=323006068328

You can do it yourself, but if you are not sure, never did, guitar is expensive etc, your tech can do it. And he can not charge a lot.

No proper Les Paul guitar should have any other nut but the Nylon one. But you know that already, as you have it on your 2013.

Report back once you have it done.

And BTW, if stock, your 2000 has Zamak tailpece and brass studs, unlike your 2013 which has aluminum tailpiece and carbon steel studs. If you prefer tone of 2013 to tone of 2000, this difference in these hardware parts is the main cause, not the difference in pickups. You can test if this is true by trying 2013 tailpiece and studs on your 2000 at next string change.

Edit: all my LP guitars have Nylon nuts. This are the best sounding, even better than your 2013 came with. And your tech/luthier wiil love you as these are already shaped and slots need just a bit of shaping and polishing, apart from already explained sanding of the bottom.
 
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jamman

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Score/cut the lacquer(sides and Headstock) with a 1/4" Chisel (me ?, I'd buy a brand new 1 so it's about as sharp as you can get it) making multi passes, so you cut it completely . from what I've read it's a crap shoot if you have an issue with the Head stock lacquer chipping /cracking . A few pro's I had asked in the past ,to swap a Nut didn't want to attempt doing it because of a chance of damaging the Head stock Lacquer .... IMO worth paying someone who has lots of EXP. doing this .

I like the Nylon and would use 1 . PITA to shape to fit . So , letting a pro ,who has the right tools to do the job might be a good choice ....
Not sure about a 2000 Gibson but, must glues will "give" under enough force ....

I wonder if anyone has tried using a glue de-activator like what is used on "crazy -glue" types of glue to work around that problem . Or nail polish remover and a syringe ?

The Link to the above E-bay vendor ,IIRC is the guy I had bought a couple from (for LP's) and He made 1 special for me for my 50th.Anni V(IIRC 2008) Great guy and does great work .... These would make your job much , much easier ...

BTW The Original Gibson Vintage Nut as 4/6 Nylon ,from what I've been told . I had the nut replaced when my TH was re-fretted and It got 4/6 nylon ...
 

Lull

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Thanks for the link! Really appreciated.

You can do it yourself, but if you are not sure, never did, guitar is expensive etc, your tech can do it. And he can not charge a lot.
If I ever decide to change it I will definitely ask my luthier to do the work. I do the setups on my guitars myself, but replacing the nut is a bit too invasive for my limited skills.

And BTW, if stock, your 2000 has Zamak tailpece and brass studs, unlike your 2013 which has aluminum tailpiece and carbon steel studs. If you prefer tone of 2013 to tone of 2000, this difference in these hardware parts is the main cause, not the difference in pickups. You can test if this is true by trying 2013 tailpiece and studs on your 2000 at next string change.
I replaced the bridge, tail piece and studs with the Faber Tone-Lock on the R9 a while ago. I remember it darkened the sound of the guitar a little and I liked it; the taller frets on the R9 (6105 I believe) seemed to enhance the high frequency content in the tone. Honestly I couldn't tell if I prefer the tone of the 2000 R9 vs the 2013 R7. They are two different animals serving different purposes; they are not redundant in any way.
 

Lull

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Score/cut the lacquer(sides and Headstock) with a 1/4" Chisel (me ?, I'd buy a brand new 1 so it's about as sharp as you can get it) making multi passes, so you cut it completely . from what I've read it's a crap shoot if you have an issue with the Head stock lacquer chipping /cracking . A few pro's I had asked in the past ,to swap a Nut didn't want to attempt doing it because of a chance of damaging the Head stock Lacquer .... IMO worth paying someone who has lots of EXP. doing this .

I like the Nylon and would use 1 . PITA to shape to fit . So , letting a pro ,who has the right tools to do the job might be a good choice ....
Not sure about a 2000 Gibson but, must glues will "give" under enough force ....

I wonder if anyone has tried using a glue de-activator like what is used on "crazy -glue" types of glue to work around that problem . Or nail polish remover and a syringe ?

The Link to the above E-bay vendor ,IIRC is the guy I had bought a couple from (for LP's) and He made 1 special for me for my 50th.Anni V(IIRC 2008) Great guy and does great work .... These would make your job much , much easier ...

BTW The Original Gibson Vintage Nut as 4/6 Nylon ,from what I've been told . I had the nut replaced when my TH was re-fretted and It got 4/6 nylon ...
This is very valuable information; thanks a lot. I'll order a nylon nut from this Ebay vendor and ask my luthier to do the swap. I realize I've been procrastinating with that matter for quite a while now.

Thank you all for taking the time to share your experience/insights.

Cheers!
 

zombiwoof

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Score/cut the lacquer(sides and Headstock) with a 1/4" Chisel (me ?, I'd buy a brand new 1 so it's about as sharp as you can get it) making multi passes, so you cut it completely . from what I've read it's a crap shoot if you have an issue with the Head stock lacquer chipping /cracking . A few pro's I had asked in the past ,to swap a Nut didn't want to attempt doing it because of a chance of damaging the Head stock Lacquer .... IMO worth paying someone who has lots of EXP. doing this .

I like the Nylon and would use 1 . PITA to shape to fit . So , letting a pro ,who has the right tools to do the job might be a good choice ....
Not sure about a 2000 Gibson but, must glues will "give" under enough force ....

I wonder if anyone has tried using a glue de-activator like what is used on "crazy -glue" types of glue to work around that problem . Or nail polish remover and a syringe ?

The Link to the above E-bay vendor ,IIRC is the guy I had bought a couple from (for LP's) and He made 1 special for me for my 50th.Anni V(IIRC 2008) Great guy and does great work .... These would make your job much , much easier ...

BTW The Original Gibson Vintage Nut as 4/6 Nylon ,from what I've been told . I had the nut replaced when my TH was re-fretted and It got 4/6 nylon ...
Vintage Gibsons used 6/6 nylon as I recall, it is harder but is also harder to find these days, which is why Gibson is now using 4/6 in the Historics. There were threads about this when they started using the Nylon nuts again, and you can get 6/6 nut blanks from some sellers (or at least you could at one time), but 4/6 is easier to find. It's supposed to be harder to slot the 6/6 because of the hardness, but it also supposedly makes for a better-sounding nut than the softer 4/6.
Al
 




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