Would you buy a Les Paul with a repaired neck crack?

ehb

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If done correctly, yes....especially if that grumpy old guy did it... Amazing work and attention to detail....

Wish grumpy would restore the grumpy old truck that grumpy takes pics of finished guitars on the back of.... Dayum....

:cool:
 
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grumphh_the_banned_one

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Necro thread, i know, but with mahogany necked Les Pauls not going away in the foreseeable future, a topic that will stay relevant for many decades to come. :D

And the answer to the original question is still a resounding YES!

A broken headstock glued back on will play and sound just like an unbroken one - but the price will be substantially lower, so it makes broken headstock guitars a good proposition for the people who either don't care or simply can't afford an unbroken one.

As for me, the guitar in the avatar is a routed '71 with an ugly looking break in it. I have kept that one over several others that had unbroken necks, simply because it is/was a better sounding guitar than the others.
I also have two other guitars with breaks, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with them.

The only downside to broken necks is that as guitars go up in value with age the broken ones will always fetch far less than unbroken ones.
In my case that means that i sold off an early 70's GT that was unrouted and unbroken (because i didn't like the sound - couldn't get it to sound right to me, pickup swaps and all) but this guitars market price is now far beyond the one in my avatar, simply because it is not broken, despite being a less well sounding instrument...
 

Jeremiah

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priced well =/= repaired well

pick one

if you get it repaired at a reputable place, it is going to cost you. Even if you do it yourself, if you really examine all the equipment and time you put in to do the repair, you wouldn't be able to give much of a discount.
 

cooljuk

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A headstock repair done right is better than new and a deal to be had. Bring 'me on!
 

grumphh_the_banned_one

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priced well =/= repaired well

pick one
Rubbish

If you glue a clean break it stays solid, the only thing a luthier can do is to make the repair cosmetically nicer than the average guitar player is capable of.

...of course a luthier can repair complicated breaks which an amateur couldn't - but for the "average" break (that doesn't get near disturbibng the truss rod function), all that is needed is a bit of glue to bring the guitar back to functionality.
 

jc2000

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NO! Im sure it would be fine if the repair was done correctly... I just wouldn't.
 

wildstage98

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Gary Moore and Kirk Hammett don't seem to mind the crack on Greeny and have no issues making it rock. i'd say as long as it's repaired well, it doesn't seem to do anything to the guitar or it's sound.
 

73Fender

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If I had to, for sure I would. As mentioned it would have to be a good repair and I would have to be low on LPs and funds. The buy price should be a big discount percentage wise. Maybe 40% from a comparable uncracked model. Actually I might prefer a well repaired neck crack over a neck that had dents and dings in places where I would feel them. I don't mind dings but I hate it when they are on the back of the neck where I can feel them.
 

Jeremiah

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Rubbish

If you glue a clean break it stays solid, the only thing a luthier can do is to make the repair cosmetically nicer than the average guitar player is capable of.

...of course a luthier can repair complicated breaks which an amateur couldn't - but for the "average" break (that doesn't get near disturbibng the truss rod function), all that is needed is a bit of glue to bring the guitar back to functionality.

see that's where expertise to identify one vs the other would come in handy, I'm not ashamed to admit I don't possess such expertise
 

grumphh_the_banned_one

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see that's where expertise to identify one vs the other would come in handy, I'm not ashamed to admit I don't possess such expertise
Nah, it should be easy to see whether a clean break* gets into the vicinity of the truss rod or not. If it doesn't get near the truss rod, then your glue is just as good as the luthiers.

Again, the difference is only that a good luthier can make the repair as good as invisible (and will cost you quite a bit in labour cost), structurally it will be the same though.
Glued wood. (And there is nothing wrong with glued wood - what is it that fastens the neck to the body on a Gibson again???)

And despite the cost of the luthier, your guitar will still be worth maximally 60% of the going market rate for an unbroken one, no matter now nice the break is touched up - it is broken, and therefore tainted in a lot of peoples eyes...

* Most pics you see of breaks do show a single fracture across the headstock - that lets you glue together two nice and pretty surfaces that fit like they belong to each other ;)
 

Bwk

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Apologize as I posted this in another thread, but I was hoping to get some feedback. I had a question about cracked necks. I stumbled upon this on sweetwater. The guitar is marked “used” because of the crack, but it’s been discounted pretty heavily. I don’t know enough about cracked necks to know if this is a stupid/foolish purchase or not. Since it’s used, there’s no real warranty to speak of, so that’s not ideal imo. Curious to know if you can tell from the photo if the repair looks good. Seems like the general consensus is it’s not a big deal if properly. Thanks in advance
B8736AC3-8EEA-48AE-8441-0155B693B6D7.jpeg
 

flamesarewicked

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If it’s cheap enough… and doesn’t look like Frankenstein’s monster
 

Bwk

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Well that is what the repair looks like. Just trying to understand if that is good work or not.
 

ARandall

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Thats pretty typical for a decent repair....without any cosmetic work being done to try and hide the line
 
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Bwk

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Does the fact that it appears to run under the tuning peg bother you?
Thats pretty typical for a decent repair....without any cosmetic work being done to try and hide the line
 

ARandall

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No, glue adheres the broken surfaces of the raw wood as it is 'designed' to do. Tuners are attached to the back of the headstock and the string tension is pulling them into that surface.
If that was a concern then the fact that the neck and body was attached by glue would be more concerning for every guitar that doesn't have a break as string tension is trying to pull the joint apart.
 
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