Would this be considered a short neck tenon?

Roxy13

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Definitely a long one! Nice guitar!
 

Greg Dunn

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Long that finish in the pickup cavity just hides it well, had to switch to l.aptop to see your pics better. That's got a killer finish.
 

LtDave32

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Long , but it doesn't really matter.

Any claimed sonic difference is highly debatable and difficult to either prove or realize, and the fact that it is difficult is the very reason it doesn't really matter.

From a strength standpoint, neither long nor short tenon joint is going to fail you.
 

Mr.6 String

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Wow, I didn’t know Gibson USA used long tenon neck joints, I thought that was reserved for the historic and custom shop line, the guitar is a looker for sure, I’ve been trying different pickups in it and wiring options it originally had the Burst buckers with push pulls I replaced it with 50’s style wiring, I’ve been through 5 different sets of PAF style pickups, three different sets of tuners ( stock Grover locking, tone pros kluson tulips and now Grover milk bottle reissue) it now has covered Duncan pearly gates with modern style wiring using mojotone vintage taper 500k pots with green Russian PIO .022/.015 caps, I’m still waiting for the grovers to arrive, I hope this is the winning set up
 

Mr.6 String

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Long , but it doesn't really matter.

Any claimed sonic difference is highly debatable and difficult to either prove or realize, and the fact that it is difficult is the very reason it doesn't really matter.

From a strength standpoint, neither long nor short tenon joint is going to fail you.
My question was long or short tenon, I have no interest about long verses short tone differences
 

LtDave32

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Greg Dunn

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Wow, I didn’t know Gibson USA used long tenon neck joints, I thought that was reserved for the historic and custom shop line, the guitar is a looker for sure, I’ve been trying different pickups in it and wiring options it originally had the Burst buckers with push pulls I replaced it with 50’s style wiring, I’ve been through 5 different sets of PAF style pickups, three different sets of tuners ( stock Grover locking, tone pros kluson tulips and now Grover milk bottle reissue) it now has covered Duncan pearly gates with modern style wiring using mojotone vintage taper 500k pots with green Russian PIO .022/.015 caps, I’m still waiting for the grovers to arrive, I hope this is the winning set up
On certain recent models you will find them.
 

jimi55lp

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It looks like the tenon it just carved into the pup route because the wood grain is same in body and tenon?? I'm voting short tenon with a long type carving?
 

nuance97

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Yeah a rule of thumb is: if you see the joint at all in the neck pu cavity it’s something other than a “short tenon.”

Really beautiful guitar btw
 

moreles

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Long. My own view is that fit trumps length. Yours is both well-fit and long, which is ideal. Theoretically, the long tenon is a better design, but in practice the benefits are too slight to be either reliably audible or mechanically significant when compared to a well-built short tenon guitar. What I do consider significant is the quyality of the fit. Some short tenon and rocker tenon guitars have empty space filled with glue, allowiung for a relatively imprecise fit to be locked in by the glue, not the wood. This practice is concurrent with other assembly line, cost cutting measures. It's kind of cheesy in a costly guitar. But even so, the number of neck failures I've seen in a lifetime of LPs is exactly zero. I used to get would up about the desirability of an "ideal" construction, but I just haven't seen mechanical neck failures in LPs -- maybe the snap-off headstock protects the neck joint from failing! -- or sonic degradation. In theory, it a thing; in practice, not a thing. Your neck joint appears really nicely executed.
 

cmjohnson

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I share the opinion that tightness of the neck joint is more important than the length of the tenon.

That being said, when is a long tenon ever a bad thing? Only when you have to remove it! :eek:

I make my guitars with neck tenons that go all the way to the bridge side of the neck pickup cavity, so it's the longest tenon possible without resorting to exotic construction techniques.

That is...if the length of my neck stock allows it. If it comes up a bit short I at least ensure that there is no open gap between the end of the tenon and the edge of the neck pickup cavity.

I also learned long ago to be conservative about routing the depth of the neck pickup cavity. Particularly on a double cutaway design like an SG, the depth of the neck pickup cavity can have structural implications.

DSC_9479_small.jpg
 

ArchEtech

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Yours is shorter than mine, but not as long as Slash’s or so the legend says.
 

Brek

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I dunno why, I just want to say, that’s what she said.
 

failsafe306

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How much does a long tenon matter when so much of it is routed away for the neck pickup?
 

cmjohnson

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There can be a lot of the tenon left over after routing. The neck route may be just 3/4 inch deep (except for the legs) but the tenon may be over an inch and a half or even two inches deep. Plenty.
 


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