Will Custom Shop finishes age just like their Vintage counterparts?

Rainbowberry

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I always wondered whether or not the guitars coming out of Gibson CS right now would age in the same way the old ones have. Would the goldtops have the green that vintage goldtops do now? Also, how would murphy aged/labs actually age themselves?

Maybe post pictures of your natural wear CS' as well!
 

pmonk

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Play a Gibson CS in damp, Smokey, musky clubs and venues for 30+ years and see what happens
 

guitardon

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I never understood plasticizers. What is it and why do they use it. I thought it was used only on earlier historics. ,my 02 R8 has aged nicely but no weather checks.
 

guitarbob123

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I never understood plasticizers. What is it and why do they use it. I thought it was used only on earlier historics. ,my 02 R8 has aged nicely but no weather checks.
From what I understand, they make the finish more elastic so it flexes with the wood during temperature/humidity changes instead of becoming brittle and then cracking when the wood expands/contracts. Technically this makes it more durable and it takes a lot more to chip/crack and you don't get checking (technically the product of a defective finish), but obviously there's the argument that it stops the body from vibrating as much and doesn't feel the same as a vintage model.
 

guitardon

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From what I understand, they make the finish more elastic so it flexes with the wood during temperature/humidity changes instead of becoming brittle and then cracking when the wood expands/contracts. Technically this makes it more durable and it takes a lot more to chip/crack and you don't get checking (technically the product of a defective finish), but obviously there's the argument that it stops the body from vibrating as much and doesn't feel the same as a vintage model.
And they’re still doing this? I’m surprised the form hasn’t pushed Gibson to go to the original nitro. I always see their ad saying everything is original including the finish. I guess I’ve been fooled all this time. I kind of knew my O2 and plasticizers but I thought the newer ones didn’t. Oh well doesn’t affect me I love my guitars.
 

guitarbob123

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And they’re still doing this? I’m surprised the form hasn’t pushed Gibson to go to the original nitro. I always see their ad saying everything is original including the finish. I guess I’ve been fooled all this time. I kind of knew my O2 and plasticizers but I thought the newer ones didn’t. Oh well doesn’t affect me I love my guitars.
Whilst there's plenty on here who are into the whole 'it's just like the real thing' vibe, I'd imagine there's plenty who would be screaming at some poor Gibson Customer Services agent about how they spent $7000 on a guitar and the finish is chipping and checking after only a year or two.

What I really, really don't understand is why Gibson can't produce a limited fixed number of Les Pauls each year with the original nitro formula. If it was a fixed quota then they'd meet any environmental limits and I'd imagine it'd be guaranteed sales.
 

joba

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I would imagine today guitars are shipped constantly all over the world from one extreme climate to another. You would have a lot of new guitars being delivered all checked up . Like it or not.
 

guitardon

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Whilst there's plenty on here who are into the whole 'it's just like the real thing' vibe, I'd imagine there's plenty who would be screaming at some poor Gibson Customer Services agent about how they spent $7000 on a guitar and the finish is chipping and checking after only a year or two.

What I really, really don't understand is why Gibson can't produce a limited fixed number of Les Pauls each year with the original nitro formula. If it was a fixed quota then they'd meet any environmental limits and I'd imagine it'd be guaranteed sales.
Well I don’t totally get it but it has no effect on me. I’m not trying to age my guitar for weather checks. I’m overall happy with the finish but I just thought I read on the forum throughout the years how they keep improving the finish. Nicos. chips like the original guitars had would not bother me. That’s a guitar. Thanks for your reply
 

el84ster

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My 2016 R8 doesn’t seem to have much plasticizer. It’s already about as hard as my ‘38 L-12!

But my ‘01 R8 never got very hard, even up till I sold it in ‘16. But I think the finish varies even in the same year.

Tone-wise it makes a difference because if the finish stay soft, then it kills some the the vibration, the high end won’t be as alive as if the finish is like glass.

Personally I think the hardness is more important to tone than the thickness.
 

guitardon

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My 2016 R8 doesn’t seem to have much plasticizer. It’s already about as hard as my ‘38 L-12!

But my ‘01 R8 never got very hard, even up till I sold it in ‘16. But I think the finish varies even in the same year.

Tone-wise it makes a difference because if the finish stay soft, then it kills some the the vibration, the high end won’t be as alive as if the finish is like glass.

Personally I think the hardness is more important to tone than the thickness.
You’re probably right and it’s probably just me but I’ve always felt that’s the finishes on a solid body electric guitar do not affect the tone like it would on an acoustic guitar. Face of the acoustic guitar the top and the back sides all vibrate. And a solid body guitar I don’t see where it would come into an effect. Furthermore I always maintained that once you plug it into the amp game over. The amp is going to affect your tone more than anything else especially for solos with overdrive. Last of all touch. I know a guy the plays a Telecaster, he was always a Les Paul guy. I was walking up to an outdoor concert and I heard him playing and I would’ve put money that he had a Les Paul. His touch an adjustment to amp tone had more effect on anything than the guitar, finish etc. Anyone of us could sit in the room with Robin Ford and he could play some stuff and then hand as his guitar and we ain’t gonna sound nothing like Robin Ford. He’s got the sweetest touch which helps create his tone. I’m not trying to start an argument just give my 2 cents. I think if you’re sitting in a quiet room with a Les Paul unplugged you might hear some of these nuances. But you have to have a darn good here.
 

ChuckHall03

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Interesting question, I would have thought yes with their statements about how true to vintage these guitars are. Now I’m curious if the true historic line from 15-16 has plasticizer as well? Certainly don’t mind the finish checking. I enjoy the look of a vintage guitar, just wouldn’t bring myself to buy one that’s already beat to hell and having to pay more for that look
 

guitardon

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Interesting question, I would have thought yes with their statements about how true to vintage these guitars are. Now I’m curious if the true historic line from 15-16 has plasticizer as well? Certainly don’t mind the finish checking. I enjoy the look of a vintage guitar, just wouldn’t bring myself to buy one that’s already beat to hell and having to pay more for that look
I agree, I went through a phase where I loved my Murphy aged guitars. I love my guitars now and every Nick and dent on them I can tell you how it got there. I don’t desire for my guitar like new. I use guitars and I sure as heck would never put them in a glass showcase. They go to gigs and they get played and they get a little necks and dents chips etc. part of the game. I don’t have any aged guitars anymore I wouldn’t pay a penny more for one.
 

ChuckHall03

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I agree, I went through a phase where I loved my Murphy aged guitars. I love my guitars now that every Nick and dent on them I can tell you how it got there. I don’t have my guitar is looking like use guitars and I sure as heck would never put them in a glass showcase. They go to gigs and they get played and they get a little necks and dancing chips etc. part of the game.
These battle scars add to the sentimental aspect of my instruments. My original strat I’ve had for some time, has some nice dings and chips in the body and neck and I remember how almost all of them happened. I took it to a new guy for a setup once and he filled in a couple of them with a paint marker. Needless to say, I let that guy have it and he never saw another guitar from me again
 

guitardon

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These battle scars add to the sentimental aspect of my instruments. My original strat I’ve had for some time, has some nice dings and chips in the body and neck and I remember how almost all of them happened. I took it to a new guy for a setup once and he filled in a couple of them with a paint marker. Needless to say, I let that guy have it and he never saw another guitar from me again
Wow, that’s a funny story. I’ll share mine with you too, not guitar related though. I had a brown Fender Princeton and I took it in for a minor repair. I told him no modifications whatsoever. When I picked it up he took the original cord threw it away and put on a three prong fat cord. Little to say I gave him a piece of my mind and will never do business with him again.
 

ChuckHall03

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Wow, that’s a funny story. I’ll share mine with you too, not guitar related though. I had a brown Fender Princeton and I took it in for a minor repair. I told him no modifications whatsoever. When I picked it up he took the original cord threw it away and put on a three prong fat cord. Little to say I gave him a piece of my mind and will never do business with him again.
Oh boy, I would have been furious, especially if I asked for no other mods. I think we share the if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it mindset, wish more people did too
 

rockstar232007

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And they’re still doing this? I’m surprised the form hasn’t pushed Gibson to go to the original nitro. I always see their ad saying everything is original including the finish. I guess I’ve been fooled all this time. I kind of knew my O2 and plasticizers but I thought the newer ones didn’t. Oh well doesn’t affect me I love my guitars.
All marketing bs.

All moder nitro-lacquers contain some level of plasticizer. Some more, some less.
 

guitardon

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Oh boy, I would have been furious, especially if I asked for no other mods. I think we share the if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it mindset, wish more people did too
. I was furious. Then the guy started yelling at me because I called his shop that was on a main street in Chicago get nine in the morning assuming I’m calling your business. The assholes dirty yelling at me I’m a musician you know we sleep in late. I’m like how was I supposed to know you’re sleeping in your store front.
 

guitarded_82

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Hard to say.. I've heard there's only a few places in the world that still make nitro. Gibson might get supply from some, all, or have their own specially made by one of them.

I make acoustics and my experience is that Behler instrument nitro doesn't check and seagave does. Who the hell knows why? Doesn't really effect the sound however the behler takes longer to cure.
 


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