WHY the hate for baked maple?

Jim

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I know, I know, you're sitting there saying "ugh, another one of these threads?" but this is the complete opposite. I'm wondering why people are so offended by the idea of alternate fretboard materials. I understand Gibson's point of view, after the raid they needed to accomodate, and even innovate. And I understand the consumers' point of view, I mean, richlite? Come on. But baked maple is great. It might not be the same thing as rosewood or ebony, but it has characteristics of ebony. It's snappy and super hard, so if there's something i'm not getting, PLEASE ENLIGHTEN ME. But to those hating on the baked maple I say:



That is all:dude:

thanks
cheers:slash::slash:
 

The Refugee

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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgIrXKpv2gw]Stewie I Don't Like Change - YouTube[/ame]

Basically.
 

Alex W

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Well, a Les Paul is an instrument steeped in history, so it appeals to people who are interested in historical specs, tradition, etc. So it seems natural to me that a typical Les Paul buyer is not thrilled by significant departures from the original specs. I say this as a Fender owner who is well aware of how maple makes for an excellent fingerboard.

Now personally, I might consider buying a LP with baked maple fingerboard, but I would expect to pay less for a compromise like that.
 

GuitarGuy503

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The idea of a non traditional wood is just a turnoff to people who are used to traditional woods (ebony and rosewood). Not to mention if you are like me you think the baked maple looks horrible on a LP...... :shock:
 

NRVPaul

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Love mine. Like Alex I always liked the Fender Maple necks so why not. I have no problem with it.
 

Shawn Lutz

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Well said Alex. People are misunderstanding devotion to classic Les Paul genetic makeup as hate for BM. I don't know, when I think of Les Paul's I think of mahogany, maple, and rosewood, not baked maple and Richlite, which may or may not be good for use on guitars. I don't hate them myself and I'd be willing to try them on a new guitar, just not a USA Gibson Les Paul STD or Custom.
 

marc1kim

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Hate? I thought everone loved it. At least maybe the people that have actually played on it, including me.:dude:
 

GERRYGTR62

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I love my baked maple fretboard on my CC--you have to give it up to Gibson with coming up with creative fretboard materials
 

joshatatlasstands

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I liked the maple necks on some of my past guitars, no problem with them, one of these days I'll have a pistachio fretboard, 2000 on the Janka scale too...

images.jpg
 

Malchik

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Now personally, I might consider buying a LP with baked maple fingerboard, but I would expect to pay less for a compromise like that.
Oh? And why would they owe you that?

Why not add Baked Maple Caps as well on the bodies...
Such a non-issue, but I assume becasue a maple cap is appropriately sealed and not prone to moisture absorption like a bare fretboard.

Doesn't matter anyway. These guitar communities are really the minority of Gibson customers. Most players will pick up an instrument, play it, like it, and take it home, without all the romantic ideals to haul around with them.
 

Alex W

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Oh? And why would they owe you that?

Mind you I did not say that they "owe" me that. I am merely speaking as a consumer who votes with his wallet.

Let's face it, electric guitars are luxury items for most of us. I don't need an electric guitar to survive, and I don't make my living playing music. So the value to me personally of an electric guitar includes its emotional appeal. And a LP with a baked maple fingerboard takes a hit in the emotional appeal dimension. If I had a choice between a used LP with rosewood fingerboard and a new one with baked maple, I'd probably lean towards the former.
 

River

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Paging LesAdrian. Please pick up a white courtesy telephone.

Yo momma's callin'.
 

marc1kim

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Yeah people always bitch about changes...just like people in the 1950s bitched about them solid body les pauls and fender whatchamacasters, and gosh them space-aged explorers, thunderbirds, and flying V...who would ever want to play such abominations? LOL

I know the die-hards are stuck to certain wood recipes, but they need to get over it or collect vintage instruments. Gibson doesnt even use Honduran Mahogany anymore,( except maybe on their custom shop models), production les pauls use Chilean mahogany. the brazilian fretboards are long gone, so they went to indian, and now that indian is out the window they're using alternate fretboards. as far as the maple caps go, I have no idea how or where those have come from over the years.
Truly, In the hands of the right guitar player it really doesnt matter what wood the guitar is made of.
 

Dr. Arkam

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I've said it before, I love my baked maple fretboard. It's the first Studio with it I've played and I liked it more than any other Studio with the exception of a 60'a tribute GT with P-90's, but that's such a different guitar that I don't think the fretboard material had much to do with it.

People in general hate change, personally I think on Traditionals or Classics rosewood and ebony would make more sense in keeping with the spirit of classis LP's but on other models I think it's great.
 

Thumpalumpacus

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Why not add Baked Maple Caps as well on the bodies...

Because they aren't trying to replace imported tonewoods on the cap, unless you know of a Les Paul model with an ebony or rosewood cap.

Hate? I thought everone loved it. At least maybe the people that have actually played on it, including me.:dude:

Damned straight, I've only played one, but it was a fine guitar. I would certainly consider BM when I look to buy my next fiddle.
 

dleuen

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I think part of the hate might come from the fact that some of the BM fretboards are light in color. I specifically picked one (50's Tribute w/HB) with the darkest fretboard Wildwood had. I love the way it looks, plays and sounds. For the record I also don't like some rosewood that is light in color. It just looks too dried out.
 

marc1kim

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But still, it's gonna sound different from another guitar made of another wood...

So then which standards should gibson adhere to if the vintage style Honduran mahogany, and Brazilian rosewood are long gone? These woods are part of the original tone recipie for Les Pauls. Different mahoganies, and rosewoods from around the world are not identical, they are similar, but not identical. They now come from the "cousins" or trees that are related to the original tone woods. to make matters worse, some arent even related, but since they share similar properties they are classified under the same names.

Gibson is trying hard to stick with their tonewood recipies, but because of laws and such they are now offering guitars with multi ply rosewood fretboards. Me? well I'm just going with the flow. I've had two maple fretboard juniors and I love them. The maple gives the all mahogany juniors some nice crisp definition to the notes that rosewood juniors wouldnt provide.
 

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