Why pay such outrageous prices for beat up replicas of 58-60 Les Pauls?

KiltedGuitarist

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I realize I'm risking backlash here, but hear me out. I am genuinely curious as to why so many folks are paying 3,4 and 5 times or more than the price of a good used or new Les Paul to buy a modern built, intentionally beat up Murphy Lab "aged" replica R8/9/0. I mean; $7500 for an "Ultra Light Aged," $8500 for a "Light Aged," $9700 for a "heavy aged," and $11,400 for an Ultra Heavy Aged R9... Really? Seriously? Why?
I understand the desire for an original, heavily played, well aged, nice patina, with documented history, etc. authentic 1959 Holy Grail Les Paul rests deep in most of our hearts and the asking prices are well out of our range. But these Murphy things aren't real. No matter how close they get, they aren't real 59s. I know, I know, the hide glue, the long neck tenon, narrow frets etc, etc. It might look or feel the part but the fact remains they aren't. But c'mon, $11,400 could buy me another 5 new 50's Standards or half a dozen used gems of LP goodiness. I guess I come from the school of buy it new and play/age/wear/patina/beat it up yourself. Please explain the rest to me I'm clearly not getting. I genuinely want to know. Thanks!
 
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bum

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They aren't made or marketed to you OP, but the people they are made for and marketed to buy them, so I'd say the system works.
Would I buy one? No, but again, I am not the market.
I do and can however see why and how a craftsman's time is worth a lot of money, and for better or for worse the Murphy guys are craftsmen, they just happen to be performing a craft that you, who is not the intended audience, does not appreciate.
 

mjross

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You have the same problem I use to have, I questioned peoples sanity but never put hands on one! IMHO you have to own one and be able to play it and get acquainted to it to get it. Just grabbing one and strumming a few chords in some music store does not do it either, you need to spend time with it.

I started adding Relic and Replicas to my collection a few years ago and they now are my most coveted guitars and that’s saying a lot. In most conversations I have with other musicians their biggest hang up is price. They just dig the shit out of the guitar until they find out how much they cost. Then the conversation changes!

I get it, Replicas are expensive! I lost a lot of sleep after buying my first Historic Makeovers Brazilian but I just love the damn things. And I’m here to tell you, there’s something very special about these guitars. However, you’ll not understand that until you own one. Bottom line, play what you like…
 

mjross

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They aren't made or marketed to you OP, but the people they are made for and marketed to buy them, so I'd say the system works.
Would I buy one? No, but again, I am not the market.
I do and can however see why and how a craftsman's time is worth a lot of money, and for better or for worse the Murphy guys are craftsmen, they just happen to be performing a craft that you, who is not the intended audience, does not appreciate.
Well said Sir, well said!
 

KiltedGuitarist

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Why? Because guitar players spend more time on internet forums than they do practicing and playing with others.

It's that simple.

They aren't made or marketed to you OP, but the people they are made for and marketed to buy them, so I'd say the system works.
Would I buy one? No, but again, I am not the market.
I do and can however see why and how a craftsman's time is worth a lot of money, and for better or for worse the Murphy guys are craftsmen, they just happen to be performing a craft that you, who is not the intended audience, does not appreciate.
Make no mistake, I do indeed geninely appreciate the craftsmanship involved in recreating these delicious looking replicas of our iconic loves. I've watched the Murpy Lab videos and am truly appreciative of the time and effort that has gone into learning how to accurately check a nitro finish and all the little taps here and there and the buckle rash, edge chipping, binding cracks, headstock wear, etc. The craft is amazing and I'm not questioning or doubting the cost of the craftsman's time. It's just not real and that would always sit in the back of my mind.
 

bum

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Make no mistake, I do indeed geninely appreciate the craftsmanship involved in recreating these delicious looking replicas of our iconic loves. I've watched the Murpy Labs videos and am truly appreciative of the time and effort that has gone into learning how to accurately check a nitro finish and all the little taps here and there and the buckle rash, edge chipping, binding cracks, headstock wear, etc. The craft is amazing and I'm not questioning or doubting the cost of the craftsman's time. It's just not real and that would always sit in the back of my mind.

Well, you've answered your own question then really
 

gball

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Well said Sir, well said!

Agreed. Not for me either, and I honestly don't understand the appeal (or, for that matter, the appeal of the entire "R" line of Cutom Shop guitars) but it clearly is working for Gibson and they seem to sell as many of the things as they can build.
 

mjross

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The above explanation by BUM is one of the best yet in this NEVER ENDING BS about Relic guitars. Maybe you are not the intended audience. Just like I’m not the intended audience for the new Bugatti Veyron. However, I’m not constantly asking the owners why they spend that much money on a car. Yeah, I could buy a shit load of Vettes but what’s the point!
 
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mjross

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Agreed. Not for me either, and I honestly don't understand the appeal (or, for that matter, the appeal of the entire "R" line of Cutom Shop guitars) but it clearly is working for Gibson and they seem to sell as many of the things as they can build.
You are not the intended audience…lol!
 
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EasyAce

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I realize I'm risking backlash here, but hear me out. I am genuinely curious as to why so many folks are paying 3,4 and 5 times or more than the price of a good used or new Les Paul to buy a modern built, intentionally beat up Murphy Labs "aged" replica R8/9/0. I mean; $7500 for an "Ultra Light Aged," $8500 for a "Light Aged," $9700 for a "heavy aged," and $11,400 for an Ultra Heavy Aged R9... Really? Seriously? Why?
You ever heard of fools and their money soon being parted? ;)
 

mudface

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Because aftermarket vendors were making bank on replicating aged guitars..... Gibson recognized there is money they are losing for not getting on the bandwagon..... If you want Gibson authentic.... there’s a premium you’re gonna pay.

It’s a finish option that requires man hours and effort/skill to do it right. Not everyone need apply to the concept.
I realize I'm risking backlash here, but hear me out. I am genuinely curious as to why so many folks are paying 3,4 and 5 times or more than the price of a good used or new Les Paul to buy a modern built, intentionally beat up Murphy Labs "aged" replica R8/9/0. I mean; $7500 for an "Ultra Light Aged," $8500 for a "Light Aged," $9700 for a "heavy aged," and $11,400 for an Ultra Heavy Aged R9... Really? Seriously? Why?
I understand the desire for an original, heavily played, well aged, nice patina, with documented history, etc. authentic 1959 Holy Grail Les Paul rests deep in most of our hearts and the asking prices are well out of our range. But these Murphy things aren't real. No matter how close they get, they aren't real 59s. I know, I know, the hide glue, the long neck tenon, narrow frets etc, etc. It might look or feel the part but the fact remains they aren't. But c'mon, $11,400 could buy me another 5 new 50's Standards or half a dozen used gems of LP goodiness. I guess I come from the school of buy it new and play/age/wear/patina/beat it up yourself. Please explain the rest to me I'm clearly not getting. I genuinely want to know. Thanks!
 

Duane_the_tub

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