Why not slant the speaker baffle to project upwards?

Lester

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I accidentally ran across this bass cab. The front of it is slanted to project sound upwards. Seems like a good idea for guitar since when playing at home you have to rig something like that anyway to hear what's coming out of the amp properly.

Is there any reason not to do this?

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sonar1

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Tilt back legs and amp stands have become widespread.
I damaged a tube trying to slant an Ampeg once and having the amp not stay put.

I might like a Super-reverb Fender since the top two tens will be about right if I sit.
 

THDNUT

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Lots of amp manufacturers have been doing this for years, like Marshall, whose bottom "B" cabinets have a slanted baffle board to project sound upwards.

I just put a roll of newspapers under the front of my amps to tilt them back. :thumb:
 

dspelman

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Bass itself is largely non-directional, but the mids/highs from the tweeter are not. Tilted speaker baffles are at least half a century old, and there's really no reason not to tilt. A lot of amp stands automatically tilt the amp (I have an On-Stage RS 7000 that tilts a combo amp back a bit, and I've used that for years), and the tilt-back legs on Fender combos have been around maybe half a century.
 

cooljuk

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It's not common because if you tilt the baffle in the cab, rather than tilting the whole cab with a mostly flat baffle, you loose internal volume of the cabinet, without reducing overall size/weight of the cabinet. In fact, you increase weight a hair. Generally, an instrument speaker cab is designed to have the least size/weight for a given internal volume.

In open back combos, it's usually "smallest box that fits the guts without problems."
 

ErictheRed

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Old Mesa metal grill cabinets had an option like this, you could buy a straight cab with slanted baffle.
 

dspelman

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It's not common because if you tilt the baffle in the cab, rather than tilting the whole cab with a mostly flat baffle, you loose internal volume of the cabinet, without reducing overall size/weight of the cabinet. In fact, you increase weight a hair. Generally, an instrument speaker cab is designed to have the least size/weight for a given internal volume.

In open back combos, it's usually "smallest box that fits the guts without problems."
There are bass cabinets that tilt the low frequency drivers toward each other or toward the floor (bass doesn't care where you point it, generally). In the latter case, it reduced the height of the cabinets, so it may have been a wash with the weight. My bass cabinets (fEARless F112, F115) have one edge whacked off so that you can run them as a wedge monitor if you like. The cabs are full range (with a mids driver and a tweeter), so they do get directional to a point, so the tilt is handy.
 

hbucker

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I have a Seismic Luke 212 cab with a slightly angled baffle. Not as much as the OP photo. But same idea. Seems practical.
 

cooljuk

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There are bass cabinets that tilt the low frequency drivers toward each other or toward the floor (bass doesn't care where you point it, generally). In the latter case, it reduced the height of the cabinets, so it may have been a wash with the weight. My bass cabinets (fEARless F112, F115) have one edge whacked off so that you can run them as a wedge monitor if you like. The cabs are full range (with a mids driver and a tweeter), so they do get directional to a point, so the tilt is handy.

Ya, when you get into low frequency drivers, especially in sealed cabinets, the positioning the drivers and how they interact with each other and the cab is much more significant.
 

Lester

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Yes, I'm familiar with the Fender arms... but that means I can't put things on top of the amp! I'm also familiar with the custom props... I do that now. I've even seen a guy selling wood wedges that your amp sits on.

And no, I'm not interested in bass, that's just where I ran across this. I don't think it would even been an issue with bass freq's - But I don't play bass, so who knows.

I'm thinking more of guitar and the highs that get lost when they come across at knee level. Perhaps this needs to be the direction of that cab I need to make!
 

efstop

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A trick that I tried once or twice (I don't gig) is putting a wedge under the front of a cab and a second, same size wedge under the rear of the head. The head won't fall off, and one can still put one's beer on the top. I don't do that, but one could ;)
 

tzd

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These 1x12 cabs have angled speakers:


 

grumphh

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While we are at it: Why not put seven, or even eight, strings on guitars so that technical players can have a wider range of notes to play?
 

LP1865

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While we are at it: Why not put seven, or even eight, strings on guitars so that technical players can have a wider range of notes to play?
I prefer 20,if you get the Stevie T reference
 

jvin248

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.

Beginning teenager players, with inexpensive practice amps, don't realize they can lift the amp off the floor and tilt it plus use placement relative to the walls, and get a lot better tone from those little amps.

Pros using amps on raised stages will do better having straight shooting baffle boards to hit the audience.

.
 

crosstownblues

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Personally, I hate to have my cabinet pointing at my head. I find that all I can hear is myself and lose track of the band. I like to hear myself in the mix, not above it. I don’t know how people can do it.
 

hbucker

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One way to lessen band volume at practice is to stand across from my cab (instead of right by it) so I hear myself more accurately. Which means I'll turn down a little to fit in the mix as well as having a more accurate understanding of the tone I'm making. The slanted baffle helps with this.

If everyone does this, overall volume drops and we hear ourselves better.

FWIW
 


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