Why not loctite?

redking

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I recently watched a youtube video of a guy fixing up all the flaws on a Squier guitar and he used loctite threadlocker blue to tighten up the loose, rattling saddle screws. Hey, its a cheap import guitar, so why not - however, since this is a common problem on an ABR-1, why not use the same product? Does it contain silicone?
 

drmmrr55

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I recently watched a youtube video of a guy fixing up all the flaws on a Squier guitar and he used loctite threadlocker blue to tighten up the loose, rattling saddle screws. Hey, its a cheap import guitar, so why not - however, since this is a common problem on an ABR-1, why not use the same product? Does it contain silicone?
I only use Loctite on the output jack, as they always seem to come loose, especially during a gig. Make sure to use the right kind, use the permanent thread locker and you'll be damaging your guitar trying get things loose if you need to. There is a temporary Loctite (blue) that I use on all my output jacks, and I've never had an issue if I need to remove the jack, plus my jacks never come loose. I wouldn't use it for the saddle screws however...
 

LPTDMSV

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I recently watched a youtube video of a guy fixing up all the flaws on a Squier guitar and he used loctite threadlocker blue to tighten up the loose, rattling saddle screws. Hey, its a cheap import guitar, so why not - however, since this is a common problem on an ABR-1, why not use the same product? Does it contain silicone?
It's methacrylate, basically a type of acrylic plastic. Not silicone.
 

E.T.

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242 is good enough for holding bolts in my engine so I can't see why it wouldn't work for ABR-1 saddle screws. If the wire rattles instead / as well something more viscous and less visible is probably better, mind- at which point why not fix all the problems with one fluid?
 

painter33

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It's methacrylate, basically a type of acrylic plastic. Not silicone.
Yes. Methyl methacrylate = Elmer’s Glue, acrylic paints; they all form an adhesive bond that will remain somewhat pliable, until they don’t, but can usually be removed with alcohol or acetone. Removal is critical in many applications.
 

Freddy G

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I recently watched a youtube video of a guy fixing up all the flaws on a Squier guitar and he used loctite threadlocker blue to tighten up the loose, rattling saddle screws. Hey, its a cheap import guitar, so why not - however, since this is a common problem on an ABR-1, why not use the same product? Does it contain silicone?
I would use it anywhere where you can break the bond by heating with a soldering iron. For example not where there might be plastics in contact that could melt.
 

redking

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I like the idea of using it on the output jack for sure! And I guess if you are going to use it on any saddle screws, you better be ready to nail the intonation pretty quick since you have 10 minutes drying time.
 

failsafe306

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I like the idea of using it on the output jack for sure! And I guess if you are going to use it on any saddle screws, you better be ready to nail the intonation pretty quick since you have 10 minutes drying time.
You should be able to set intonation and saddle height and then wick a little of the blue stuff into the threads.
 

moreles

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I have a Collings with a Mastery bridge and trem (I also have a Squire!) so it's not only Squiers that rattle! The Mastery has intonation screws and bridge height screws that love to wander. I snug them in the correct position and use just a bit of acrylic nail polish and that ends the travelling and virtually all the buzzing that otherwise can get pretty annoying (though it doesn't get through to the pickups, but still...). Some people do use Loctite, but I think it's overkill. Yiou can break the nail polish bond with ease. I'm tempted to use it on my LP bridge to kill a few small buzzes there. Don't Loctite your output jack nuts as doing so will put 50,000 guitar techs out of work.
 


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