Why no Fender Tweed 6V6 re-issues?

mbell75

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Pretty much all of the 50s Fender tweed amps were 6V6 with a few 6L6 in there too. However, the only current tweed amps based on those old 50s models are 6L6 in the Blues Deluxe and Blues Deville or the EL84s in the Blues Jr which was an odd choice IMO. I know most of the Reverb re-issues have the 6V6s but why no tweed amps with them? I really wish Fender would make some 50s era tweed re-issues with 6V6s. The originals are some of the most sought after amps of all time, I'd imagine re-issues would be quite popular. Its long overdue.
 

Marshall & Moonshine

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My guess is that they're keeping that ace in the hole. Many people who play a small tweed amp never want to play anything else.
Curing GAS is bad business. :)
 

Ph03n1x

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Tons of people are doing up point to point wired kits of classic Tweed circuits. I have considered doing up one many times. Without reverb some of them are super simple.
 

Splattle101

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Pretty much all of the 50s Fender tweed amps were 6V6 with a few 6L6 in there too. However, the only current tweed amps based on those old 50s models are 6L6 in the Blues Deluxe and Blues Deville or the EL84s in the Blues Jr which was an odd choice IMO. I know most of the Reverb re-issues have the 6V6s but why no tweed amps with them? I really wish Fender would make some 50s era tweed re-issues with 6V6s. The originals are some of the most sought after amps of all time, I'd imagine re-issues would be quite popular. Its long overdue.

The modern 'tweed' amps don't really have a lot to do with the 1950s tweeds at all. They are designed to sound more like the 1960s blackface amps than the 1950s tweeds.

The tweed amps of the 1940s and the first half of the 1950s sounded quite different. Generalizing here, the tweeds:
* were cathode biased, giving more compression and less efficiency;
* were equalised to pump out more low mids;
* were more primitive in their power supply, causing 'sag'; and
* gave less clean headroom.

All of that made the tweeds fat sounding, and prone to a really growling kind of overdive when pushed hard.

So for example, the 1950s tweed Deluxe had a pair of cathode biased 6V6s, powered by a primitive power supply with poor voltage regulation and no current regulation at all. They were driven by a cathodyne phase inverter which was prone to blocking distortion. It had two channels (bright and normal), with independent volume controls (that actually interact in interesting and unintended ways), and a single master tone. It was about 13-15 Watts into a 12" speaker. It was nothing at all like the modern Hotrod Deluxe or Blues Deluxe.

(BTW, Fender does a custom shop hand wired reissue of this amp, and there are hundreds of clones out there.)

In contrast, the blackface amps had stiffer power supplies and higher voltages. This gave them better dynamic range and extended treble response. They were equalized to cut a lot of low mids, but produce lots of treble. When that combined with extra power and treble it produced the 'sparkling' clean sound that Fender is now famous for. The modern amps are designed more like the blackface amps than the tweeds. The exception there might be the Hotrod Pro Junior. The rest are pretty much blackface voiced amps with overdrive built in.

So the modern 'tweeds' are really only 'tweed' amps to the extent that they're covered in tweed.:naughty:
 

acstorfer

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You can always go the Victoria route. I would take a Victoria over any reissue that Fender would do of their own product. Actually I would take a Victoria over an original vintage Fender amp as well. Not knocking vintage Fender, some of those amps are still going strong after 60+ years. I'm just saying Victoria, well I would imagine just about everyone here knows.

*Of course I would take Swart above all else :)
Swart doesn't exactly do exact replicas of Fender stuff
 

sonar

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Pretty much all of the 50s Fender tweed amps were 6V6 with a few 6L6 in there too. However, the only current tweed amps based on those old 50s models are 6L6 in the Blues Deluxe and Blues Deville or the EL84s in the Blues Jr which was an odd choice IMO. I know most of the Reverb re-issues have the 6V6s but why no tweed amps with them? I really wish Fender would make some 50s era tweed re-issues with 6V6s. The originals are some of the most sought after amps of all time, I'd imagine re-issues would be quite popular. Its long overdue.

The Bruce Zinky designed Hot Rod series has nothing to do with 50's era Tweed. Just because Fender occasionally wraps a cabinet in Tweed cloth does not = 50's era Fender amplifier.

And what 50's era Fender are you writing about? Narrow panel? TV front? If you're referring to narrow panel, Fender has released custom shop Narrow panel Tweed Deluxe's on a couple different occasions over the past 10 years. The Tweed Champ back in late '08. The Eric Clapton Series of Tweeds (amps that were actually based on the original Tweeds and not just dressed in cloth) covered close to 65% of the Narrow panel line.

This is the second thread where you're confusing (on purpose or not) two completely different things.

The Hot Rod Series are not Tweed re-issue's, nor are they based on those designs any more than almost any other tube amp made after 1959. Period.

If you like the HR amp line, fine. Just stop confusing the two.

People actually search archival threads on MLPF looking for reliable information. These threads do not help.
 

BigDipper15

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I'll take my tungsten crema wheat instead. Fender would probably throw out some PCB production run amps for more than they are worth. Too many good hand wired options out there.
 

50WPLEXI

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I'll take my tungsten crema wheat instead. Fender would probably throw out some PCB production run amps for more than they are worth. Too many good hand wired options out there.

You've got that right. The Crema would blow away anything Fender could put out. I had one and like a dumb ass I sold it. Fast forward a few years and I have it's big brother, the Buckwheat. Glorious sounding amp indeed!
 

sonar

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I'll take my tungsten crema wheat instead. Fender would probably throw out some PCB production run amps for more than they are worth. Too many good hand wired options out there.

I was obsessed with the Crema Wheat for awhile. Cool amps, but I've since realized I like the stock 5E3 setup a little better. The Crema addressed a lot of the deficiencies with Deluxe's and dark PAF humbuckers, but lost some dynamics in the process. imo.

The Fender Tweed reissue's were pretty well built, hand wired amps. Unfortunately they cost a fortune. I think Fender still has a Custom Shop Deluxe in the lineup. Iirc, it's a 5E3 with a Celestion Blue.
 

mbell75

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The Bruce Zinky designed Hot Rod series has nothing to do with 50's era Tweed. Just because Fender occasionally wraps a cabinet in Tweed cloth does not = 50's era Fender amplifier.

And what 50's era Fender are you writing about? Narrow panel? TV front? If you're referring to narrow panel, Fender has released custom shop Narrow panel Tweed Deluxe's on a couple different occasions over the past 10 years. The Tweed Champ back in late '08. The Eric Clapton Series of Tweeds (amps that were actually based on the original Tweeds and not just dressed in cloth) covered close to 65% of the Narrow panel line.

This is the second thread where you're confusing (on purpose or not) two completely different things.

The Hot Rod Series are not Tweed re-issue's, nor are they based on those designs any more than almost any other tube amp made after 1959. Period.

If you like the HR amp line, fine. Just stop confusing the two.

People actually search archival threads on MLPF looking for reliable information. These threads do not help.

Im sorry, while not a direct tweed re-issue, Im pretty sure the Blues Deluxe is supposed to be based off the 50s era tweed amps. Fender says themselves according to the owner's manual the normal channel is "based on the original tweed Bassman circuit of the late 1950's and is capable of delivering every performance characteristic." Not to mention it sounds much closer to a 50s era tweed than say a 65 DRRI. Thanks for the info though
 

mbell75

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You can always go the Victoria route. I would take a Victoria over any reissue that Fender would do of their own product. Actually I would take a Victoria over an original vintage Fender amp as well. Not knocking vintage Fender, some of those amps are still going strong after 60+ years. I'm just saying Victoria, well I would imagine just about everyone here knows.

*Of course I would take Swart above all else :)
Swart doesn't exactly do exact replicas of Fender stuff

Thanks! Ive thought about Victoria amps but they aren't easy to find for a demo, even here in southern California with tons of music shops around. Same with Swart but they seem terribly overpriced IMO.
 

Soul Tramp

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Same with Swart but they seem terribly overpriced IMO.


They are not "terribly overpriced", but they are expensive. It is a case of "you get what you pay for".

My Tweed 12 sells for $2,375. That's expensive, but still under valued given competitive amps. It takes 50 hours to build one. The Mercury Magnetic transformers cost three times as much as the other commonly used U.S. made Magnetic Components transformers. The cabinet is finished in 11 coats of shellac & lacquer. It's built with glass epoxy turret boards. And there's MANY other design, component, and construction factors that put it way above anything coming out of Fender, Marshall, Vox, etc (their custom shops included).

I use my amps as an example, but the same reasoning holds true for companies like Swart and Victoria.

The high-end hand-built amps are not for everyone, but that doesn't make them anymore over priced than is a Bugatti.
 

Marshall & Moonshine

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Im sorry, while not a direct tweed re-issue, Im pretty sure the Blues Deluxe is supposed to be based off the 50s era tweed amps. Fender says themselves according to the owner's manual the normal channel is "based on the original tweed Bassman circuit of the late 1950's and is capable of delivering every performance characteristic." Not to mention it sounds much closer to a 50s era tweed than say a 65 DRRI. Thanks for the info though

The Normal Channel still has to go through a different power section with different voltages, and the rectification is different.
 

The Ballzz

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Blues Deluxe, Hot Rod Deluxe, Blues Jr, etc, have very little in common with the real Tweeds, other than the Tweed covering. With that said,
I'll gladly build you an authentic 5E3 Deluxe clone, with a few modern "safety" upgrades, 4/8/16 ohm speaker outs for $1200, plus speaker, plus shipping! I personally love a Celestion Greenback!

Of course, you always buy from Fender:

’57 Deluxe™ Head, 120V | Fender Guitar Amplifiers

Fender The Edge Deluxe, 120V

Just My $.02,
Gene
 

mbell75

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Blues Deluxe, Hot Rod Deluxe, Blues Jr, etc, have very little in common with the real Tweeds, other than the Tweed covering. With that said,
I'll gladly build you an authentic 5E3 Deluxe clone, with a few modern "safety" upgrades, 4/8/16 ohm speaker outs for $1200, plus speaker, plus shipping! I personally love a Celestion Greenback!

Of course, you always buy from Fender:

’57 Deluxe™ Head, 120V | Fender Guitar Amplifiers

Fender The Edge Deluxe, 120V

Just My $.02,
Gene

A Deluxe clone with a Celestion speaker? No way. Thats just wrong to have a chimey, British speaker in a classic American amp. It would be high end Jensen or possibly Eminence :) I'll PM you and inquire some more.
 

acstorfer

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If Fender were to make true reproductions of the amps you're asking about they would be charging around the same as Victoria and Swart. There is much more involved with these amps than you think if you consider them overpriced.
 

acstorfer

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Im sorry, while not a direct tweed re-issue, Im pretty sure the Blues Deluxe is supposed to be based off the 50s era tweed amps. Fender says themselves according to the owner's manual the normal channel is "based on the original tweed Bassman circuit of the late 1950's and is capable of delivering every performance characteristic." Not to mention it sounds much closer to a 50s era tweed than say a 65 DRRI. Thanks for the info though

"Based off" really doesn't mean the same. It doesn't even mean that it's close. My 50's Tribute Les Paul is "based off" the original Les Pauls from the 50's. While I like my Tribute, it's not even close to the originals, especially in quality.
 

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