Why a chambered les paul does not cost more than a solid one?

Eagle X

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To start with, I want to clearify that I'm not talking about 'whether a chambered les paul is worse than...' blah blah blah.

I'm just curious why some brands make their cheaper les pauls chambered while making high end series solid or traditional weight relieved.

For example, late 70s Greco EG500 (like mine) is chambered, while the more expensive EG700 at the same age is solid.

Doesn't chambering cost more money? :hmm:
 

BKS

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What is weight of them? Perhaps they use heavy lumber for the chambered cheapies.
 

E.X

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Let's see how far off i am, as i'm in no way a Gibson expert, just using my head:

- Well a CnC does both, you have it programmed for 'chambered' and programmed for 'normal'. Will take it a few more seconds/minutes to do the 'chambered' programmed run, so in a day, you might be a couple of guitars back compared to what you optimally could have made; but that's peanuts.
Am sure they count all their peanuts at Gibson, but you need at this point also remind yourself that sometimes extra costs 'roll off' into other segments or categories. So it's a bit difficult to say it costs more, or less.

- You might have pieces of mahogany that are unfit for customs, unfit for standards, but juuust fine for chambereds, if you get my meaning. Not aware if that's the case, but i could see it happening given how wood's chosen or discarded for guitars. In that case, you're well into bonus, nevermind cost.
 

Roxy13

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Because in this case the 500 is likely a plywood top and the 700 is a solid maple cap.

And there was no CNC yet in the 70s. Fujigen got it sometime in 1982. It seems like Gibson got it around that time as well.
 

JamesT

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Older chambered guitars were primarily due to the lower grade, heavier woods they used. Veneers or black paint were slapped on to dress up a lower grade product. Newer stuff is chambered for the same reason but the sales pitch of enhanced tonal qualities is neatly rolled into the equation with (sometimes) dubious merit to the claims.
 

slapshot

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Make no mistake here there is no chambered old Japanese les Paul’s.

late 70s Greco EG500 (like mine) is chambered,
multi piece body with a pressed plywood top. That’s not chambered just cheap. Eventually they stopped that but the 70s was ripe with cheapies made like that from everyone
 

Grenville

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What Roxy, JamesT and Slapshot have said.

Gibson-type chambering is a far cry (yes, better) from what's going on inside your EG500 or lower instrument.

The less expensive early-mid-70s Japanese guitars were not quality mahogany with cavities carved into it and a solid maple top, they were cheap grade backs, often hollow with blocks inside with birch plywood laid over the top to make an arch.

The pricier ones had nice wood and were made with more attention to detail. In other words, the nicer cuts of wood is why it costs more money.
 


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