Who here runs a stereo rig?

Oldskoolrob

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Just getting into the wide world of stereo (pun intended)! This is all via my pedal board which feeds into the mixer, so no heavier or harder than a standard pedalboard :) Reason being I'd like a 'bigger' sound as we're a 3 piece most often.

So far I have my tuner-> Boss Flanger, where it separates into stereo-> TC Mimiq (interesting bit of kit, which I'm still struggling to find my sweet-spot). One channel goes to my Boss Tremolo-> Tech 21 Liverpool (private stock Deluxe)-> Boss DD7.
The other channel goes to a Tech 21 British and joins the signal at the DD7, where left and right are off to the mixer, panned hard either side.

It's a balancing act with the two 'amp' pedals to get the settings just right. So far I have the British on a mild overdrive which cleans up when turned down on the guitar. On the Liverpool I have a couple of different settings from clean-ish to full on. So each of these clean up quite well with the guitar volume also, and changing between them acts as my solo 'boost'. I'm still changing stuff and knob twiddling but at home the effect is pretty cool. Looking forward to the pandemic ending, gigs starting and using it 'for real'.

The idea is for a subtle effect that is just 'bigger' than a single guitar without anyone noticing particularly why. I've decided to put the tremolo where it is to play with the dry/wet set-up as opposed to trem on both. When I select different settings on the liverpool channel it changes the flavour of the overall sound - a little like a dry/wet set up I guess. I'm still developing the set-up but it seems to be doing the trick.....at home, anyways.

So who else here runs stereo and what advice would you have for a beginner?
 

ARandall

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I have a tri stereo......up to 6 amps connected.
I have 2 stereo pedals.....one chorus and then a reverb/delay later in the chain.
Plus a boss multi line pedal for further splitting.
The key with multiple amps I've found is to take the time with each one to get it sounding great by itself.
Then once they're combined tweak the levels, drive and eq so they sit well together. You might have to re tweak each amp at the end just so it cuts through and maximises the stereo effect.
 

somebodyelseuk

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Different kind of stereo , here.
Been using a rackmount setup for nearly three decades, based around a Triaxis pre... Technically, it's just dual mono unless I use stereo effects.
Main thing to watch out for is phasing issues when using two speakers. Sound fine in one spot, but stand somewhere else and they can sound like crap.
 

Oldskoolrob

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cool - do you think the different 'amps' and the mimiq will help alleviate phasing?
 

somebodyelseuk

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Yes,.
I was actually coming back to edit my post.
As you're going through a mixer, an old recording/mixing 'trick' that might prove valuable is to set your sound up, in mono - no panning, better still, through one speaker. Tweek the eq, so you can distinguish between the two amps, they don't need to be dramatically different. Set em individually, then try em together. Once you've got a great sound, then pan em. It WILL sound huge.
Then it's just a case of eqing everyone at the mixer, so you're not all stepping on each others toes.
 
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Rwill682

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So who else here runs stereo and what advice would you have for a beginner?
I used to run stereo. I had a Marshall JCM 800 combo and various 70's Fender Blackface types as my two amps- most commonly a mid-70's pro reverb. I quite liked it- especially for recording in our rehearsal studio- sounded FAT. However, as time went on I found it less necessary for several reasons. 1st- How often do you hear guitars recorded in true stereo (same performance w/different sources) on recordings? Not often- and although it was a fun way to record it became monotonous (pardon the pun) quickly because it's limited- it's two amps in stereo- so any over dubbed single track must compete with a redundant stereo track. 2. multiple amps to carry- self explanatory on that one. 3. Believe it or not- a single amp, correctly dialed in sounds MUCH better. I started taking time to find the sweet spots with my amps and was pleasantly surprised- a single amp allows for more nuanced playing. A bit like having 2 people singing- yes they cover each others mistakes (in the case of an amp "tonal weaknesses") but a single singer with a great voice is lowered to the lever of whoever they're having to sing with. 4. playing with second guitar player- again self explanatory.

2 amps/stereo can be nice- they cover the entire frequency range; they provide a cool effect, especially w/stereo delays etc and they give you a powerful/loud presentation instantly- great for "broad brush strokes"- but It's important to remember that when the entire band is engaged the mix will be in stereo- drums bass and guitar will create a stereo image and if the guitar is spread out to both sides it gives the mix/other instruments less room to breath (also as mentioned in an earlier response the mixer would have the two amps in dual mono without stereo effects OR through a single amp it would be mono coming from two speakers) . My advice- favorite guitar and pedals through a single/best amp and crank it up (if you're used to two it's twice as much wattage)- take the time to dial it in. You can always switch back to stereo. For recordings- playing the same part twice is a much sweeter effect than recording two amps simultaneously- it allows you to vary the amount of layering.... well that was a long response- cheers! Happy playing
 

kenmarkat

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+1 on recording separate tracks to provide "stereo" in a mix - I do that with all my rhythm guitar recordings. But playing live our band has chosen to do mono to both speakers with all the instruments. Stereo sounds great with keyboard filter sweeps, drum roll-offs and some guitar patches, but along with the phasing possibilities the audience sitting on one side might not hear the full sound, only the stereo channel on their side - not as good overall. So we stick to mono so that everyone hears the same thing out of the house mix regardless of their location but I guess it's up to whatever people want to do.
 

Oldskoolrob

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Finally got to play my stereo rig at rehearsal today at full tilt. I was in heaven!
 


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