Who also plays bass?

CoolRene

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I do. Fell for a Clover Argo 5 string. Great… but heavy (~12 lbs)!
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Brian Krashpad

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I've been the bassist in several bands. In a couple of those we had different membership configurations over time, and depending on the total number I would either be the lead player (with 4 or 5 members) or the bassist (trio). It's its own thing and is a lot of fun so long as you don't expect it to be like guitar.

As far as your physical limitations go, if you're having trouble with Fender scale guitars, bass could prove too difficult. Might wanna wait until your abilities have come back a bit more.

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dasherf17

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I do, but I'm definitely a more inspired guitarist than a bassist.

My current one is a 1978 Aria neck through. Love it.

Same here...I've had a few basses over the years, '67 and '76 Thunderbirds (I have an Emptyphone neck and body on the way, parts ordered) and a "70s Dan Armstrong plexi . I have now a no name Korean P/J pickuped bass...can't wait for the TBird to get started with.
 

samm57

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If the long scale bothers your shoulder, you might try out a U-Bass (ukulele bass). They are small, have large rubber strings, and you would not believe the bass they put out. This would give you a very short scale to try it on while your shoulder recovers.
 

smallstar67

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.
I started out on bass. It is the most in demand instrument if you are looking for a band. Just remember, bass is a percussion instrument, one of the reasons it's so much fun.
 

Geronimo

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.
I started playing guitar around age 7. I picked up the bass when I was around 11. I had started a band with my brother and we practiced at my parents house. This was around 1966. The bass player would leave his stuff at our house and I started noodling and picked it up pretty quickly. Drums too. I’m a guitarist but I also get calls for bass gigs also. Back then my teacher would make us learn “bass-chord” accompaniment to songs. Walking the bass line up to the next chord and so on. I would learn the bass part to a song first. It was easier to pick out the chords that way because I had the root note from the bass. And it’s lead me to be very picky about bass players. There’s maybe two or three I’ll even consider working with around where I’m from. The bass is the heart of the band. You can have the greatest singer, drummer and guitarist in the world but if your bass player is weak you’re a garage band.
 

Azhar

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.
I use a Fender Mustang Justin Meldal Johnsen Bass with flatwound strings in my studio, although I do have a beautiful 75 Jazz Bass I use the Mustang exclusively. Light, easy to adapt when switching back and forth from guitar to bass(I am a professional guitar player that works in his own recording studio). This bass is a fantastic sounding, well made instrument. And if you want more growl just change to roundwound bass strings. Although I use the flatwounds for everything....
 

lwchafin

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I noodled around a bit when my kid was actually a kid - bought a Squier J Bass that I eventually sold - actually was a nice instrument but I never got beyond noodling with it. It never bothered me to play it, and I've got two rebuilt shoulders.
 

carlaz

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I am an indifferent guitarist :eek2: but I think I'm a better bassist -- even though I am a pick player and tend to treat the bass like a species of less obvious lead guitar. :dude: I got a used Rickenbacker 4001 for a few hundred bucks back in the '90s because the bass player in my band was a lefty and I couldn't play his instrument easily when helping him work out bass lines. But I fell in love with it, and have dragged it around from continent to continent with me ever since (along with, of course, my Les Paul, which I had also purchased shortly before the bass!). It will shock the "purists", but I changed out the stock single-coil pickups (which I didn't like) for humbucking Rickenbacker HB1 pickups and added a "custom" truss-rod cover. :cool:

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I picked up my brother's Peavey T-40 from time to time back before the world shut down and jamming together was a thing. I didn't really find it too comfortable, but loved the departure from guitar and keyboard as it adds such a distinctive dimension to the music. He's a great player, though like many of us, would love to have more time for it.

To supplement guitar and keyboards on my home recording, I picked up a Sterling S.U.B. Ray 4-string a few years ago. I find it much more comfortable than the Peavey, and the neck just feels right. The sound palette is broad enough to encourage experimentation - which as guitarists, we just love to do (right?). I don't own a bass amp, so when I want to play out loud I run it through a Bose L1 Compact with the ToneMatch equalizer. Sounds incredible.

I'm not a "good" bass player, but have developed enough of an "ear" for it from decades of focusing on each instrument on favorite tracks that I'm more or less able to mimic the basics of a given bass line to round out the songs I record. I plan on putting more time into improving my bass playing now that I'm "semi-retired" and my personal life is finally settling down a bit.

Who knows, once I'm "comfortable" with bass I might move onto drums! Anyone else?
 

Robert Corrington

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I’ve played guitar and bass off and on since middle school. I own a short scale (30”), two medium scale (34”) and several long scale (34”) basses as well as a Gibson Les Paul Studio.


I prefer and recommend the Ibanez SRMD200 Mezzo 32" medium scale bass. It is light, sounds good, and relatively inexpensive (~$400 new). The PJ pickups and active electronics enable you can get numerous useful sounds.

Enjoy.
 

starwares

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.
We call 'em "recovering guitar players"...
Bass is played just like a guitar with the 4 low strings... that is the notes are the same but bass has it's own place and purpose. Guitar players often wind up playing "lead bass" which is cool; often interesting.
Short scale basses are back. Many brit groups used short scale back in the day.
I started with a 30" scale bass and played that for many years. Short scale is not that much of a "stretch" from guitar.
There are a lot of inexpensive shorties about now though I haven't really played many.
Pick up an inexpensive but decent bass used and give it a go.
 

Robert Corrington

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I’ve played guitar and bass off and on since middle school. I have a short scale (30”), two medium scale (34”) and several long scale (34”) basses.

I prefer and recommend the Ibanez SRMD200 Mezzo 32" medium scale bass. It is light, sounds good, and relatively inexpensive (~$400 new). The PJ pickups and active electronics enable you to dial in numerous useful sounds.

By the way, some people recommend the Fender Classic Vibe P-bass or J-bass as a nice inexpensive introductory bass (~$430 new). I really like the way they feel and sound. However, they are heavy (~9lbs). The Ibanez is much lighter.

Enjoy.
 

Rorer714

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.
I began playing bass and "graduated" to 6-string. another tool in the toolbox! try a short-scale bass first to see how you get along and how your shoulder likes it. maybe even a semi-hollow or hollow body unit for the weight factor.
 
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dasherf17

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We call 'em "recovering guitar players"...
Bass is played just like a guitar with the 4 low strings... that is the notes are the same but bass has it's own place and purpose. Guitar players often wind up playing "lead bass" which is cool; often interesting.
Short scale basses are back. Many brit groups used short scale back in the day.
I started with a 30" scale bass and played that for many years. Short scale is not that much of a "stretch" from guitar.
There are a lot of inexpensive shorties about now though I haven't really played many.
Pick up an inexpensive but decent bass used and give it a go.

As mentioned above, I picked up that Korean P/J bass (P pickup in middle, J pickup at bridge for anyone who didn't know). One of the better $20 purchases I made.
 

ArtWerkOrange

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I have a jacked up (not in a good way) shoulder, wrist and elbow. Worse on the right side. I tend to not notice as much whence I am rocking. I like playing anything with stringg, but draw the line at 12. I had a Fender Bass VI, which was too much like a guitar so I sold it and bought a nice 68 J Bass (reissue). It is fun to play, but I can get bored easily, but I am finally finding my bass voice. Squire makes a pretty nice Classic Vibe series, plus it is always good to have one around. I should note, I have a huge GAS problem. So I do not need too many excuses to buy gear.
 

zeplin

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I have an Epiphone EB-0 that I noodle around with sometimes. Only problem is finding short scale strings locally. Lots of fun to play.


 

Cory

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.
I guess it depends in what context you’re planning to use it - are you planning to play in a band, or just get one to sit and fiddle with at home? Although there are the obvious crossovers/similarities to a 6-string guitar, bass guitars don’t always get the respect that they deserve - it’s a different instrument in its own right, and there’s a technique and learning curve to playing it appropriately - I think a lot of guitar players just assume that since they play guitar that bass is easier - in some aspects that is true, but depending on how far you want to take it and respect as it’s own instrument, it can be super fun and challenging - Tool & RHCP are perfect examples of how bass can be more than just “rhythm” or playing the same notes in sequence with a guitar - I started off playing bass for a few years before switching to guitar - it wasn’t until I made the switch that I truly started appreciating what a good bass player can bring to the mix.
 

dasherf17

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I have a jacked up (not in a good way) shoulder, wrist and elbow. Worse on the right side. I tend to not notice as much whence I am rocking. I like playing anything with stringg, but draw the line at 12. I had a Fender Bass VI, which was too much like a guitar so I sold it and bought a nice 68 J Bass (reissue). It is fun to play, but I can get bored easily, but I am finally finding my bass voice. Squire makes a pretty nice Classic Vibe series, plus it is always good to have one around. I should note, I have a huge GAS problem. So I do not need too many excuses to buy gear.

AWO...gas on, Friend, gas on!
Signed
The Justice League of Enablers :hmm: :applause::dude:
 

rocknrollmouse

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So I've gotten curious about playing bass. I've never really been interested in it before but I've been listening to quite a bit of Tool and Red Hot chili Peppers lately and it has me wondering if I'd enjoy it. I don't think I've ever picked one up before so I know absolutely nothing about them. My biggest concern is how long they seem to be compared to a Les Paul. I had a shoulder replaced in January and it's all I can do to play the slightly longer scale length of a Tele so I'm wondering if I would enjoy it or get frustrated with my limitation and let it collect dust.

Just curious what other Les Paul players have experienced and if I should save myself the grief and forget about it.

Hi Phylodog,

I'm a bass player who occasionally hits a guitar ;)

Bass can be loads of fun, and will give you freedom in different areas to a guitar, so if you have an itch, I would say scratch it!

Hear what you're saying about your bad shoulder, but you don't say which it is(?) - I'll assume it's your fretting arm, and also the shoulder your strap goes over.

Firstly, fret span of your fingers, this is wider than a guitar, but it's not forming chords (although some players do do this, it's maybe not a style for you). The good news is the most common two notes you'll play on bass are root and 5th (ie one string higher, and two frets up - eg 5th fret on E string and 7th fret on A string), this is a comfortable reach and you should be able to do it easily.
(Quick tip, start learning and practicing at the 5th or 7th fret, not with the open strings. As you get used to playing, work up the neck towards the headstock - take your time and play comfortably.)

Consider a short scale bass, EB3 (SG shape) and/or violin (beatle style) bass. The violin is hollow, and light, but can take a little getting used to; an EB3 is a little heavier and simple slab body (like an SG) - both are likely to be lighter than your Les Paul, or if your LP has weight-relief/chambered, it might be similar to the EB.
I imagine less weight on your shoulder is going to mean less restriction in freedom of movement, and so better for your bad arm/shoulder. Shorter scale is also less stretch.
(Personally I'd avoid LP style basses, the ones I've tried are very heavy, not great for shoulders or backs)!

Playing position. Thinking back to something John Entwistle (bass player in the Who) said about his playing style, it's near the end of the fret board (I play this way, between fretboard and next pickup), as opposed to Jack Bruce (Cream bass player) who played near the bridge. You mention slap players, who would also play near the neck.
When playing near the neck, you have the bass so the headstock is nearer to your body than if you play near the bridge.

As you are worried about the neck length for your reach, I think you'll find both a short scale bass and playing near the end of the fretboard, will bring the headstock closer to you, and so reduce reach you need.

One final thing to try, is to hang your instrument from your 'wrong' shoulder, the plucking arm rather than the fretting. (I've done this some times to relieve my back, it doesn't cure anything, but it feels different and can increase playing time.) Again, this takes weight off your fretting arm and shoulder and moves the headstock toward your body.

Hope some of this helps, and opens the door to you trying something new.
Good luck
 

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