Where are the cop killers when you need one?

SteveGangi

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In that scenario (greater risk) they should be paid more (greater reward).

I don't have a lot of sympathy for criminals, regardless of their 9-5 calling. I'd be fine with shooting most.
Higher pay for police would be fine with me. Why not? I can't think of any reasons, since we waste so much on nonsense. May as well pay the guys doing some work.
 

nauc

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Cops should be held to a higher standard, and their punishments should be worse when they fuck up.

Kinda like traffic citation fines being doubled when workers are present.
agreed and people who start all these fires that burn the shit out of Cali every summer (and other places), should be charged with attempted murder!
 

Oldskoolrob

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Cops should be held to a higher standard, and their punishments should be worse when they fuck up.

Kinda like traffic citation fines being doubled when workers are present.
Where I work that's kinda how it works..... and you only need an allegation against you to put you on a desk and have your pay cut.
 

Boss 302

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History of MLP has shown that the worst thing you can do when you're dead wrong is to double-down. "me against the world " doesn't work.
Everybody makes mistakes. So what you do when you high-side off the bike (which you absolutely did) is to get up, dust yourself off, say "sorry guys, my bad" like a man, then get back in the game elswhere on another tbread. Believe me, the gang will appreciate it and all will be forgiven. Or they're not men themselves, just self-righteous little weenies.


BAD thread title, and BAD idea.

"Where are the cop killers when you need one"... Are you out of your ever- lovin' mind?

Now, what remains to do... Are you going to put it right? Or are you going to be the mouse with the middle-finger held high while this Abrams tank of a forum rolls right over you?

..and that WILL happen, trust me on that too.
Dave, it's friday in my part of the world.
If he won't play nice, unleash the hounds,:laugh2:

You did warn him. :rofl:
 

TheX

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Happy Friday kids, let the fun begin.
 

Roberteaux

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What the hell was the officers intent? Didn't read like an extortion scam - just a power trip?
"Why?" is a very interesting question. :thumb:

It's certain that part of the answer has something to do with his psychological makeup-- but my guess of the moment is that his consciously-directed motive had to do with professional advancement. I agree that he does not appear to have been directly extortionate while framing people.

It also appears that most of those he framed were strangers to him... he wasn't out there setting up people he personally hated or anything like that.

The extraordinary villainy of it is really something. Over 100 cases-- some of them for felony drug possession-- have been vacated out of the 200+ cases that are already being looked at. And every case started with a traffic stop.

That's a hell of a lot of traffic stops in just two years for a small-time county deputy to be making... but I guess the brass didn't lift an eyebrow until the specific types of allegations against the cop piled up high enough that it couldn't all just be sour grapes.

And then they found the video and actually saw him planting drugs... and that's when I started wondering about his professional life, as a cop.

***************​

This guy worked for Jackson County, Florida, for two years before his malfeasance came to light... but before that, he worked as a deputy sheriff for Liberty County for some brief period of time.

For those who aren't familiar with the areas at hand, Liberty County is in the Florida panhandle... and it's the least populous county in the state of Florida. The total population of Liberty County is under 8,000 souls. A little more than half of the county consists of the Apalachicola National Forest.

So, with the meager tax basin provided by such a small population, it's a cinch that working as a deputy sheriff for someplace like Liberty County was a fucking snooze and more or less a dead end, career-wise.

I don't know how long he was with Liberty County, but he somehow finagled a job with Jackson County two years ago. And though Jackson is also not what we'd call a populous area, it still sports about five times the population of Liberty County. There are about 50,000 people living in Jackson County.

So, there's probably slightly better pay in Jackson, and it's probably a bit of a step up in terms of how interesting a cop's monthly activities happen to be. Still pretty snoozy, but not such a boring-ass mind killer as working for Liberty County almost certainly was.

For Deputy Wester, it was probably like being hired away from Mayberry PD, to work the mean streets of Mount Pilot.

But even at that: it's still small potatoes so far as cop jobs are concerned. Even a small coastal city such as Daytona Beach has a higher number of residents than Jackson County-- and one hell of a lot more going on in terms of police activity, even during non-tourist months.

Jesus. Can you imaging working as a cop in such a podunk jurisdiction? Unless one was simply married to the area and not all that ambitious to begin with, it's not the sort of place that's liable to attract a really sharp career copper. There's almost no room for promotion, advancement, or specialization.

BUT, you've got I-10 running through Jackson County, and once in a while you even get a *genuine* dope bust while working traffic on an interstate highway. In fact, a recent "big" drug bust on the highway in Jackson County was made just last spring, when somebody on the highway got popped for a whole three ounces of meth.

The papers went wild. It was probably the biggest meth bust in Jackson County history!

And that might have gotten our boy to thinking... :hmm:

Maybe he could become a higher-ranking cop after getting a rep as being a human dope bloodhound? Or perhaps he might be hired by a more happening kind of agency-- maybe Tallahassee PD or Leon County S.O.?

***************​

Don't laugh: we've had it happen just like that elsewhere in Florida.

There was a Florida Highway Patrol officer named Robert Vogel, who made a significant number of dope busts-- and then multiple big cash busts-- all on the interstate. Florida loved it, because that cash was all eligible for felony forfeiture.

So, the local press started blabbing a lot about ol' Trooper Vogel and the big blobs of money he was harvesting out there on I-4 and I-95...

And then he ran for Sheriff of Volusia County and actually won-- mostly because the incumbent was retiring and very few average citizens had heard of any of the other candidates before.

So I dunno, maybe this guy saw a future for himself, and was willing to build it on bogus arrests for drug possession?

That's my guess of the moment.

--R
 

krauley

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History of MLP has shown that the worst thing you can do when you're dead wrong is to double-down. "me against the world " doesn't work.
Everybody makes mistakes. So what you do when you high-side off the bike (which you absolutely did) is to get up, dust yourself off, say "sorry guys, my bad" like a man, then get back in the game elswhere on another tbread. Believe me, the gang will appreciate it and all will be forgiven. Or they're not men themselves, just self-righteous little weenies.


BAD thread title, and BAD idea.

"Where are the cop killers when you need one"... Are you out of your ever- lovin' mind?

Now, what remains to do... Are you going to put it right? Or are you going to be the mouse with the middle-finger held high while this Abrams tank of a forum rolls right over you?

..and that WILL happen, trust me on that too.
you make so much sense its ridiculous!
 

Bill Hicklin

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"Why?" is a very interesting question. :thumb:

It's certain that part of the answer has something to do with his psychological makeup-- but my guess of the moment is that his consciously-directed motive had to do with professional advancement. I agree that he does not appear to have been directly extortionate while framing people.

It also appears that most of those he framed were strangers to him... he wasn't out there setting up people he personally hated or anything like that.

The extraordinary villainy of it is really something. Over 100 cases-- some of them for felony drug possession-- have been vacated out of the 200+ cases that are already being looked at. And every case started with a traffic stop.

That's a hell of a lot of traffic stops in just two years for a small-time county deputy to be making... but I guess the brass didn't lift an eyebrow until the specific types of allegations against the cop piled up high enough that it couldn't all just be sour grapes.

And then they found the video and actually saw him planting drugs... and that's when I started wondering about his professional life, as a cop.

***************​

This guy worked for Jackson County, Florida, for two years before his malfeasance came to light... but before that, he worked as a deputy sheriff for Liberty County for some brief period of time.

For those who aren't familiar with the areas at hand, Liberty County is in the Florida panhandle... and it's the least populous county in the state of Florida. The total population of Liberty County is under 8,000 souls. A little more than half of the county consists of the Apalachicola National Forest.

So, with the meager tax basin provided by such a small population, it's a cinch that working as a deputy sheriff for someplace like Liberty County was a fucking snooze and more or less a dead end, career-wise.

I don't know how long he was with Liberty County, but he somehow finagled a job with Jackson County two years ago. And though Jackson is also not what we'd call a populous area, it still sports about five times the population of Liberty County. There are about 50,000 people living in Jackson County.

So, there's probably slightly better pay in Jackson, and it's probably a bit of a step up in terms of how interesting a cop's monthly activities happen to be. Still pretty snoozy, but not such a boring-ass mind killer as working for Liberty County almost certainly was.

For Deputy Wester, it was probably like being hired away from Mayberry PD, to work the mean streets of Mount Pilot.

But even at that: it's still small potatoes so far as cop jobs are concerned. Even a small coastal city such as Daytona Beach has a higher number of residents than Jackson County-- and one hell of a lot more going on in terms of police activity, even during non-tourist months.

Jesus. Can you imaging working as a cop in such a podunk jurisdiction? Unless one was simply married to the area and not all that ambitious to begin with, it's not the sort of place that's liable to attract a really sharp career copper. There's almost no room for promotion, advancement, or specialization.

BUT, you've got I-10 running through Jackson County, and once in a while you even get a *genuine* dope bust while working traffic on an interstate highway. In fact, a recent "big" drug bust on the highway in Jackson County was made just last spring, when somebody on the highway got popped for a whole three ounces of meth.

The papers went wild. It was probably the biggest meth bust in Jackson County history!

And that might have gotten our boy to thinking... :hmm:

Maybe he could become a higher-ranking cop after getting a rep as being a human dope bloodhound? Or perhaps he might be hired by a more happening kind of agency-- maybe Tallahassee PD or Leon County S.O.?

***************​

Don't laugh: we've had it happen just like that elsewhere in Florida.

There was a Florida Highway Patrol officer named Robert Vogel, who made a significant number of dope busts-- and then multiple big cash busts-- all on the interstate. Florida loved it, because that cash was all eligible for felony forfeiture.

So, the local press started blabbing a lot about ol' Trooper Vogel and the big blobs of money he was harvesting out there on I-4 and I-95...

And then he ran for Sheriff of Volusia County and actually won-- mostly because the incumbent was retiring and very few average citizens had heard of any of the other candidates before.

So I dunno, maybe this guy saw a future for himself, and was willing to build it on bogus arrests for drug possession?

That's my guess of the moment.

--R

One wonders- does the record show any nexus between this deputy's busts, and civil asset forfeitures? I'm having difficulty figuring out a motive, since "career advancement" doesn't seem to fit this guy at all.
 

Roberteaux

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One wonders- does the record show any nexus between this deputy's busts, and civil asset forfeitures? I'm having difficulty figuring out a motive, since "career advancement" doesn't seem to fit this guy at all.
Well, as I mentioned above: we've already seen that gaining a rep as a dope-seizing fool can lead to bigger and better positions as a law enforcement officer.

But you suppose he'd stick his neck out to plant evidence and make felony arrests just so he could make felony forfeitures on behalf of his county or the State of Florida?

I don't see it. Especially not in the small-time possession cases he made by planting little bundles of dope on select citizens. That's not the kind of bust that gives an agency a forfeiture to begin with. Not sure about Virginia, but in Florida the courts don't generally start looking at forfeiture actions until something over $10,000 bucks worth of assets are involved because that's about what it takes for the state to break even on the deal.

And so they're not going to seize somebody's car because that person was in possession of a few volts of meth or weed... and that's all this guy seems to have been framing others for: really trifling quantities of dope. In one case, the bust was for meth residue in a plastic bottle!

But even if they were in possession of larger quantities, our appellate courts are not fond of punitive forfeitures being made against small time criminals.

And look at who-all he was busting. Not a one of them registers as some kind of drug mogul by any means. They were all little people.

Nah, this ain't about money for the county or state. Instead, this guy was doing what he was doing because there was something in it for him. And when it comes to police work, the only thing in it for anybody to do something like what this guy was up to would be to enhance his professional standing.

I'd agree that it takes a particular psychological makeup for a person to resort to framing perfect strangers like that... but let's face it: there's so much shit to bust people for without falsifying anything at all that certified power trippers quickly get their fill of that shit. In a reasonably active jurisdiction, one sign that an officer is no longer a stone rookie is when he or she begins to look at the business of making an arrest as a form of work and routine--- but not as some big thrill.

You pop enough people and the thrill is gone... and in most cases, that thrill is gone before two years of time as a cop has elapsed.

Of course, this guy was out in the middle of nowhere... so for him, perhaps the thrill was still all shiny and new. However, I even doubt that, seeing as he's performed hundreds of pull overs in his two years with Jackson County.

But as I said: you can make busts all day long, every day, without hardly looking for something to bust for. It's a lot like writing traffic tickets: you could write 100 a day if you had time, because there's so many bad drivers out there.

In a less rural environment, making small-time dope busts is a cut above that in terms of difficulty... but not much above it. You get good at performing Terry Stops, and you start seeing dope constantly. It's not a big trick.

--R
 

JTM45

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Don’t they have to go back through his arrests now and investigate any possession charges? This could create a serious issue for the department and bring into question any previous partners and a host of other thing I would assume
 

Brians Evil Twin

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Don’t they have to go back through his arrests now and investigate any possession charges? This could create a serious issue for the department and bring into question any previous partners and a host of other thing I would assume
100+ cases tossed out
At the request of the Jackson County Sheriff's Office, Wester's former employer, the FDLE began investigating the deputy in August after bodycam video from a February 2018 arrest appeared to show Wester planting methamphetamine in Teresa Odom's pickup truck during a traffic stop, FDLE spokesman Jeremy Burns told CNN in September.

At the time, the FDLE was reviewing 254 of Wester's cases, prosecutors said.

"The investigation shows Wester routinely pulled over citizens for alleged minor traffic infractions, planted drugs inside their vehicles and arrested them on fabricated drug charges," the FDLE said in its Wednesday news release, adding that it had reviewed more than 21 hours of footage in its investigation.
 

JTM45

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100+ cases tossed out
At the request of the Jackson County Sheriff's Office, Wester's former employer, the FDLE began investigating the deputy in August after bodycam video from a February 2018 arrest appeared to show Wester planting methamphetamine in Teresa Odom's pickup truck during a traffic stop, FDLE spokesman Jeremy Burns told CNN in September.

At the time, the FDLE was reviewing 254 of Wester's cases, prosecutors said.

"The investigation shows Wester routinely pulled over citizens for alleged minor traffic infractions, planted drugs inside their vehicles and arrested them on fabricated drug charges," the FDLE said in its Wednesday news release, adding that it had reviewed more than 21 hours of footage in its investigation.

Thank you sir, I admittedly skimmed
 




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