When Do I Stop?

Nard

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I’ve only been recording my own stuff using a DAW for just under a year now and I’m still learning a lot about how to get the best from it. Trouble is I keep going back to the first songs that I recorded and re- recording the guitars mainly but also adding keyboards or percussion. I’m usually satisfied but then I go back a few weeks later and hate the guitar sound or feel that it’s not sitting right. This week I got to grips with gain staging and put it use on an old track and kept thinking I need to change the guitars again. I’m not trying to make high quality demos but I want a good sound nevertheless. Does this happen to everyone or am I just being fussy
 

Frogfur

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Are you recording guitars direct then adding effects, or micing amps ?
 

Freddy G

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That happens to everyone. Best advice I can give is sure, re-do stuff once or twice max....but anything more and you're just obsessing and beating a dead horse. You'll get way more mileage by being prolific. Do lots of things, make quick, gut instinct decisions. I see people that obsess over a recording they did years ago....spending all their time on it, pulling their hair out. Let it go, move on.
 

Nard

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Are you recording guitars direct then adding effects, or micing amps ?
The interface I use is a Boss Multitrack recorder with effects included so I’ve used them. The first recordings on the Boss sounded ok but were a bit limited on the editing and mixing so I transferred the recordings to Reaper to get more control. Outlet is now it’s like I have too much control and can’t leave it alone.
 

Nard

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That happens to everyone. Best advice I can give is sure, re-do stuff once or twice max....but anything more and you're just obsessing and beating a dead horse. You'll get way more mileage by being prolific. Do lots of things, make quick, gut instinct decisions. I see people that obsess over a recording they did years ago....spending all their time on it, pulling their hair out. Let it go, move on.
I know in my own mind I should do exactly what you’re saying. I know it’s getting in the way of putting newer stuff together but it’s almost like leaving something unfinished and just giving up. Glad to hear it’s not just me goes through this kind of thing though.
 

Frogfur

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The interface I use is a Boss Multitrack recorder with effects included so I’ve used them. The first recordings on the Boss sounded ok but were a bit limited on the editing and mixing so I transferred the recordings to Reaper to get more control. Outlet is now it’s like I have too much control and can’t leave it alone.
I see. Do you have the ability to mic your amp(s) and try and record what tones you like that way ?
We use Capture software and Studio One Daw software which works well.
The difference is we're using a new PreSonus 24 track digital mixer. But we also record by micing amps rather than direct. With a fretted conventional bass i usually go direct.
 

Freddy G

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you are simultaneously learning the craft of recording engineering/production at the same time you are being the recording artist. That's one of the reasons it can be frustrating. The one thing is holding you back from the other (I'm assuming). Imagine what it would be like if you didn't have to wear the technical hat....just waltz in to a studio and be the artist....have experienced engineers there to perfectly capture what you're doing, mix it and have it all sound great. That's a luxury few of us can afford. So I think the best thing is to record a lot. Just make a habit of recording everyday....even if it's something you don't think is worthy of recording. It will get the process more ingrained to the point where you're perfectly comfortable when you hit the red record button. You can quickly do things....and that means a lot...
 

Nard

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I see. Do you have the ability to mic your amp(s) and try and record what tones you like that way ?
We use Capture software and Studio One Daw software which works well.
The difference is we're using a new PreSonus 24 track digital mixer. But we also record by micing amps rather than direct. With a fretted conventional bass i usually go direct.
I’ve got a condenser mic that I use for acoustic guitars but it’s nothing special. I tried plugging the acoustic straight into the interface but it sounds to boomy. I’ve recently acquired a mixer and was looking at going through that as I can get a better eq before recording. Mic’ing the amp didn’t really work too well when I tried it but that could be my inexperience with these things. I’m not blaming the equipment I use to record but it is pretty low end stuff and that combined with my lack of knowledge is probably half the problem.
 

Nard

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you are simultaneously learning the craft of recording engineering/production at the same time you are being the recording artist. That's one of the reasons it can be frustrating. The one thing is holding you back from the other (I'm assuming). Imagine what it would be like if you didn't have to wear the technical hat....just waltz in to a studio and be the artist....have experienced engineers there to perfectly capture what you're doing, mix it and have it all sound great. That's a luxury few of us can afford. So I think the best thing is to record a lot. Just make a habit of recording everyday....even if it's something you don't think is worthy of recording. It will get the process more ingrained to the point where you're perfectly comfortable when you hit the red record button. You can quickly do things....and that means a lot...
I can’t argue with that. I’m in an area where there are very few musicians who I could get together with and learn from or take advice from. Thank god for this place or else I wouldn’t have even got this far. Maybe I’d benefit from another pair of ears from someone who knows what I’m trying to achieve. Thanks for the pointers Freddy. Maybe trying something new each time will shake me out of the rut I’m getting myself into.
 

Frogfur

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I’ve got a condenser mic that I use for acoustic guitars but it’s nothing special. I tried plugging the acoustic straight into the interface but it sounds to boomy. I’ve recently acquired a mixer and was looking at going through that as I can get a better eq before recording. Mic’ing the amp didn’t really work too well when I tried it but that could be my inexperience with these things. I’m not blaming the equipment I use to record but it is pretty low end stuff and that combined with my lack of knowledge is probably half the problem.
Not at all. Don't give up. Here are two very good sights. Spend a little time with them. Tou can learn things that might apply to you.
https://www.youtube.com/user/VisionRecordingCt

https://www.youtube.com/user/recordingrevolution
Both have allot to offer home recording. But there are times during the recording process that i just need a break and come back fresh. Geez, we've got stuff from the seventies thats been changed more times than Carter's got pills.
 
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