What's on YOUR workbench right now?

Ripthorn

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Wow, so nice man. Looks very refined! Tell me about the finish. :)
I used a combination of red, yellow, and blue to make an orangey due that went over sanded back black. The burst is a 75/25 mix of brown and black. Crystalac Brite tone is the finish. Burst sprayed with an LVLP detail gun, clear shot with a black widow HTE. Dry sanded with super assilex and super bufflex, then buffed with bat compound on wheels, finished with swirl remove and a foam pad.
 

Ripthorn

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Im not one for the more modern designs and shapes, but this is a killer looking guitar. The proportions and shapes are just excellent.
Thanks! I put a lot of time into the design phase of each of my designs with that being the goal. This is one of my most successful ones, but I enjoy the process for each.
 

SlingBlader

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I used a combination of red, yellow, and blue to make an orangey due that went over sanded back black. The burst is a 75/25 mix of brown and black. Crystalac Brite tone is the finish. Burst sprayed with an LVLP detail gun, clear shot with a black widow HTE. Dry sanded with super assilex and super bufflex, then buffed with bat compound on wheels, finished with swirl remove and a foam pad.
Very cool. How is the Crystalac to work with? Any issues with witness lines, or does it burn into itself? Is it similar to nitro when it comes to buffing/polishing? I'm wanting to find a waterborne finish to experiment with, hence my curiosity. :)
 

Ripthorn

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Very cool. How is the Crystalac to work with? Any issues with witness lines, or does it burn into itself? Is it similar to nitro when it comes to buffing/polishing? I'm wanting to find a waterborne finish to experiment with, hence my curiosity. :)
I've not noticed any witness lines, though I am still trying to find the right process through buffing and polishing. I found that it sprays differently depending on shop temperature. When I was spraying a different instrument early in the year, I had to add the reducer for it to get it to flow out well. During the summer (granted, I'm in Texas) I don't need any reducer. Here are a few other items:

- It needs to go on relatively heavy to get it to flow our well
- I found it's best to spray body front/back horizontally to minimize runs due to needing to spray relatively heavily
- I spray the sides with it hanging and using a small detail gun
- It dry sands really well
- Due to lack of complete burn in, don't scuff sand too coarse. I found scuff sanding at 800 was pretty good to prevent any kind of transmission of scratch pattern
- It can be hard to tell how thick it is. I burned through on my mandolin build (first build with this) in a couple of spots.
- A little goes a long way, once you have your setup dialed it. I really struggled with runs earlier on. I finally arrived at spraying a couple light coats on the top and sides while horizontal, then a couple light coats on back and sides while horizontal, followed by a scuff sand, a few heavier coats on top, a few heavier coats on back, then spray the sides hanging and not worrying about the overspray onto top and back. Doing the sides first results in worse textured overspray that requires more level sanding. Of course, if your technique doesn't suck like mine, you probably don't need to worry about this.

On the whole, I like it, but for the cost and the amount of work, I've decided I need to stick with oil and wax as my primary finish and only use this when I need the super shiny-shiny.
 

SlingBlader

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I've not noticed any witness lines, though I am still trying to find the right process through buffing and polishing. I found that it sprays differently depending on shop temperature. When I was spraying a different instrument early in the year, I had to add the reducer for it to get it to flow out well. During the summer (granted, I'm in Texas) I don't need any reducer. Here are a few other items:

- It needs to go on relatively heavy to get it to flow our well
- I found it's best to spray body front/back horizontally to minimize runs due to needing to spray relatively heavily
- I spray the sides with it hanging and using a small detail gun
- It dry sands really well
- Due to lack of complete burn in, don't scuff sand too coarse. I found scuff sanding at 800 was pretty good to prevent any kind of transmission of scratch pattern
- It can be hard to tell how thick it is. I burned through on my mandolin build (first build with this) in a couple of spots.
- A little goes a long way, once you have your setup dialed it. I really struggled with runs earlier on. I finally arrived at spraying a couple light coats on the top and sides while horizontal, then a couple light coats on back and sides while horizontal, followed by a scuff sand, a few heavier coats on top, a few heavier coats on back, then spray the sides hanging and not worrying about the overspray onto top and back. Doing the sides first results in worse textured overspray that requires more level sanding. Of course, if your technique doesn't suck like mine, you probably don't need to worry about this.

On the whole, I like it, but for the cost and the amount of work, I've decided I need to stick with oil and wax as my primary finish and only use this when I need the super shiny-shiny.
That's great information, exactly what I was looking for. I may have to give it a try. :thumb:
 


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