What's on YOUR workbench right now?

bierz

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I couldn't resist a quick mockup. I'm pretty pleased, though there is still final sanding prior to finishing.
Incredible use of wood on that body. So cool that the grain mimics the body contour and the change in color creates its own visual facet. Is the long heel for structural purposes or more an aesthetic thing?
 

Ripthorn

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Incredible use of wood on that body. So cool that the grain mimics the body contour and the change in color creates its own visual facet. Is the long heel for structural purposes or more an aesthetic thing?
The heel on most PRS are left long because they found with the "short heel" models back in the day that there was a relatively high occurrence of dead spots. I figure it can't hurt, and I don't intend the hollowbody to be the first choice for shredding on the high frets. Plus, I can't shred on any guitar, so it all works out!
 

Thrill

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Not on my workbench, but in the same general area. Just finished putting it together a few days ago. Had to get a replacement for the shitty little 7" black and decker that just barely was holding itself together.

 

Skyjerk

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Not on my workbench, but in the same general area. Just finished putting it together a few days ago. Had to get a replacement for the shitty little 7" black and decker that just barely was holding itself together.

‘you’ll love having a proper band saw :)
 

LtDave32

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Already do. Its been a lot of fun. Really sucked getting it down the steps to the basement though LOL.
Nice saw!

Be sure to set both the upper and lower bearing guides right, and be sure to check both sets of them after a few cutting sessions. they tend to move around before they settle in.
 

cmjohnson

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I'm not too thrilled to discover that the neck I recently made for one of my current builds has decided to take a backbow.

I made it from a blank of curly maple that's laminated from flatsawn stock so it's effectively quartersawn. And very, very pretty. The board is on it, it's been fretted, and as is my usual practice, I let it sit for weeks or months (or even more than a year) before putting it on a body. But now it has a backbow, which I estimate to be about 0.015 inches.

I'll finish out the neck shaft shaping and probably give it the old Florida Heat Treatment, which is to place it out in the Florida sun with a nice 25 pound weight laying across the center of the fingerboard, and let a day's worth of Florida summer heat it up and maybe straighten it out but good. That has worked for me in the past.

The blank was dead straight when I attached the board. It was dead straight after fretting. A month later it had moved.

This is exactly why I say that you should make necks first and let them settle out and find their new shape before you attach them to the body.

PRS lets necks sit for a month after EVERY stage in the neck making process. To give them time to assume their new shape now that the stress patterns have changed. I am doing the same thing for the same reason.
 

pshupe

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I'm not too thrilled to discover that the neck I recently made for one of my current builds has decided to take a backbow.

I made it from a blank of curly maple that's laminated from flatsawn stock so it's effectively quartersawn. And very, very pretty. The board is on it, it's been fretted, and as is my usual practice, I let it sit for weeks or months (or even more than a year) before putting it on a body. But now it has a backbow, which I estimate to be about 0.015 inches.

I'll finish out the neck shaft shaping and probably give it the old Florida Heat Treatment, which is to place it out in the Florida sun with a nice 25 pound weight laying across the center of the fingerboard, and let a day's worth of Florida summer heat it up and maybe straighten it out but good. That has worked for me in the past.

The blank was dead straight when I attached the board. It was dead straight after fretting. A month later it had moved.

This is exactly why I say that you should make necks first and let them settle out and find their new shape before you attach them to the body.

PRS lets necks sit for a month after EVERY stage in the neck making process. To give them time to assume their new shape now that the stress patterns have changed. I am doing the same thing for the same reason.

I assume you are using a one way rod? The next question would be why? I only use one way rods when I am doing something vintage correct and then would always glue the fret board after carving the neck profile with a forward bow caul. It still worries me but so far it has worked out well.
 

cmjohnson

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No, I always use PRS style double action rods. But I expect a neck to NOT MOVE in the first place. It's annoying when it does anyway. It's probably a movement that can be adjusted out, but it IS quartersawn maple so it's going to be pretty stiff.
 

Ripthorn

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I'm not too thrilled to discover that the neck I recently made for one of my current builds has decided to take a backbow.

I made it from a blank of curly maple that's laminated from flatsawn stock so it's effectively quartersawn. And very, very pretty. The board is on it, it's been fretted, and as is my usual practice, I let it sit for weeks or months (or even more than a year) before putting it on a body. But now it has a backbow, which I estimate to be about 0.015 inches.

I'll finish out the neck shaft shaping and probably give it the old Florida Heat Treatment, which is to place it out in the Florida sun with a nice 25 pound weight laying across the center of the fingerboard, and let a day's worth of Florida summer heat it up and maybe straighten it out but good. That has worked for me in the past.

The blank was dead straight when I attached the board. It was dead straight after fretting. A month later it had moved.

This is exactly why I say that you should make necks first and let them settle out and find their new shape before you attach them to the body.

PRS lets necks sit for a month after EVERY stage in the neck making process. To give them time to assume their new shape now that the stress patterns have changed. I am doing the same thing for the same reason.
I let my necks sit for a month or two because I'm that slow at finishing off the body :)
 

dcomiskey

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Scored this massive slab of old growth redwood for $100 last week. It's huge. About 17x24 x 1 1/2" thick. What would you guys do with this? Resaw for one-piece tops or use part as full body blank with a fancy 1/4" top and the rest for book matched tops? Pictures don't do the figuring justice, but it kept soaking up my naptha...

64479180300__32A83CF8-4F38-4EEF-B3AA-0B2EA00460E5.JPG
IMG_0472.JPG
 

Ripthorn

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Scored this massive slab of old growth redwood for $100 last week. It's huge. About 17x24 x 1 1/2" thick. What would you guys do with this? Resaw for one-piece tops or use part as full body blank with a fancy 1/4" top and the rest for book matched tops? Pictures don't do the figuring justice, but it kept soaking up my naptha...

View attachment 542633 View attachment 542634
Might need @Skyjerk 's giant clamp for that...
 


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