What would you do?

artis_xe

Christopher
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I give rides to anyone willing to ride in the trunk
 

Roxy13

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I was riding back home tonight with my kids in the back and I stopped to help.
Three young raccoons were in the middle of the incoming lane licking some shit off the asphalt.
I waved at someone coming to slow down and proceeded to make the raccoons move to a piece of
land nearby. Their mom must have gotten killed because they were really small and just by themselves.
I guess they're big enough to have a chance but anyway, I wasn't afraid to stop 'cause I have never seen
raccoons with knives or guns...
So there you go.
Actually they stay with their mom for the first year. However if it was fairly recently she was likely around somewhere. She is teaching them how to find food and good denning sites. I have 4 babies in my horse barn right now. I almost never see mom these days though, but she is somewhere watching. Their first year is their hardest as they have to try to put on enough weight and fat to make it through that first winter. They will usually den up with mom for it, but body heat only goes so far.
 

Death Incarnate

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You made the right decision. Makes me think of the horrifying case of Dorothy Donovan being murdered by a her son picking up a hitchhiker. He kicked him out, the hitchhiker ended up making his way by coincidence to his mother’s house. They got him from DNA decades later.


 

James R

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What if he was going to Tim Hortons? Aren't Canadians duty bound to give someone a ride to Tim Hortons?
Actually, as a Canadian, I feel duty bound to talk people off of the ledge if they’re considering drinking Timmie’s coffee.
Life is too short for shitty coffee, and make no mistake, Tim Horton’s serves shitty coffee.

Disclaimer:
I enjoy an Ice Capp once or twice a summer, but never go near their dishwater... err... I mean “coffee”.

185A7BBD-5639-4246-A19F-84C78A043B01.gif
 

rabidhamster

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I’ve given strangers rides from time to time. Usually I don’t. Last person I let in was female and even then I was suspicious. She just needed a ride to Walmart and something something yadda yadda. She could’ve stolen everything on me and gotten a car and 50 cents. She wouldn’t have made it a mile without pulling over for gas. Might have done me a favor.


In times past I have given rides to more shady looking male individuals. One thing that most people don’t worry about when giving a ride to a stranger is ass sweat. A stranger who needs a ride can probably soak your car seat in the wretched spoiled milk of sweaty ballsass faster than you can imagine.
This is the biggest concern, and one that keeps coming back to remind you and the next date you stick in that seat.


So anyway, the secret to reasonably safe hitchhiking is to have two large males occupy the car. Hitchhiker gets front passenger seat. Original occupant gets rear seat directly behind hitchhiker.
It is rear passengers duty to garrote or Dublin smile a suddenly- unruly hitchhiker if necessary, whom will now be just as on edge as you.
So now when I don’t have a willing back seat party in the car; I don’t have to feel badly that I’m not prepared. I also feel a sense of relief for my nose and car seats.

Once I picked up a hitchhiker who Claimed to have personally split his own tongue. It wasn’t the cleanest example I’ve seen, and it was one of the first, so I believe him.
 

pnuggett

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I’ve given strangers rides from time to time. Usually I don’t. Last person I let in was female and even then I was suspicious. She just needed a ride to Walmart and something something yadda yadda. She could’ve stolen everything on me and gotten a car and 50 cents. She wouldn’t have made it a mile without pulling over for gas. Might have done me a favor.


In times past I have given rides to more shady looking male individuals. One thing that most people don’t worry about when giving a ride to a stranger is ass sweat. A stranger who needs a ride can probably soak your car seat in the wretched spoiled milk of sweaty ballsass faster than you can imagine.
This is the biggest concern, and one that keeps coming back to remind you and the next date you stick in that seat.


So anyway, the secret to reasonably safe hitchhiking is to have two large males occupy the car. Hitchhiker gets front passenger seat. Original occupant gets rear seat directly behind hitchhiker.
It is rear passengers duty to garrote or Dublin smile a suddenly- unruly hitchhiker if necessary, whom will now be just as on edge as you.
So now when I don’t have a willing back seat party in the car; I don’t have to feel badly that I’m not prepared. I also feel a sense of relief for my nose and car seats.

Once I picked up a hitchhiker who Claimed to have personally split his own tongue. It wasn’t the cleanest example I’ve seen, and it was one of the first, so I believe him.
Asssweatphope.
 

fry

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My mom tells a story about a time 50 years ago, maybe longer. My dad picked up a hitchhiker once, and when he let the guy out, the guy grabbed my dad’s pack of cigarettes and took them with him. Is that a risk you’re willing to take?
 

Meatwad

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In times past I have given rides to more shady looking male individuals. One thing that most people don’t worry about when giving a ride to a stranger is ass sweat. A stranger who needs a ride can probably soak your car seat in the wretched spoiled milk of sweaty ballsass faster than you can imagine.
This is the biggest concern, and one that keeps coming back to remind you and the next date you stick in that seat.
 

defcrew

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Charity in general i smuch more prickly than it seems on the surface. To the OP's general query at the front of this about what a person of faith should do my folks--who are now in their 80s--are members of a Sunday School class made up primarily of retired college profs and so on who have been together since the late 60s in some cases. A while back they had a discussion on charity and brought in some guest speakers, so to speak. One was my sister who--after having survived (so far) breast cancer--founded a cancer outreach center in her town which she ran for ten years. She told them and she's told me she had to get out of the charity business before she became cynical about it. While she honestly was able to help scores of folks there were cases of people faking cancer and all sorts of other ruses to get at the pot of gold. The other woman who spoke was equally hard edged in her views on it--much harder than the consensus of the class in general.
As a freind once told me, "We forgive for ourselves." This is somewhat true with helping strangers such as you describe. I've done it many times and lived to tell about it. when we lived out in the country in the middle of nowhere more than once folks walked up to my door in the middle of the night who had run out of gas. I assisted every one of them although in a case or two I did take the time to slip a pistol in my pocket. With cell phones stranded people are not so stranded as they used to be. I guess you have to keep your antennae up to somebody running a hustle. I mentioned in another thread that the cost of being distrustful is much higher than that of being trustful and I really believe that. It doesn't mean you have to be a fool.
 

mistermikev

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i grew up in a small town and was as trusting as can be. I moved to LA at 19 and quickly learned to never acknowledge someone reaching out to me on the street. absolutely cynical, that said I freq give money to vagrants... I know it's a scam 90% of the time... but I feel like that doesn't matter... because I still did something good. Not picking anyone up and giving them a ride, ever. Don't feel guilty at all. If you want a reason to justify yourself: a hitchhiker could in theory take you back to your house at gunpoint... where your family is.
 

Stevie 202

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I was riding back home tonight with my kids in the back and I stopped to help.
Three young raccoons were in the middle of the incoming lane licking some shit off the asphalt.
I waved at someone coming to slow down and proceeded to make the raccoons move to a piece of
land nearby. Their mom must have gotten killed because they were really small and just by themselves.
I guess they're big enough to have a chance but anyway, I wasn't afraid to stop 'cause I have never seen
raccoons with knives or guns...
So there you go.
Might not have been a good idea
 

Bobby Mahogany

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Might not have been a good idea
She stopped in the left lane of a busy highway where traffic speed is around 115-125 km/h (70-80 mph)
without looking back at what was coming.

I stopped in the middle of a long stretch on the side of a secondary road with the hazards on, no immediate incoming traffic.
Quite different.
I haz a brain!
:fingersx:
 

defcrew

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i grew up in a small town and was as trusting as can be. I moved to LA at 19 and quickly learned to never acknowledge someone reaching out to me on the street. absolutely cynical, that said I freq give money to vagrants... I know it's a scam 90% of the time... but I feel like that doesn't matter... because I still did something good. Not picking anyone up and giving them a ride, ever. Don't feel guilty at all. If you want a reason to justify yourself: a hitchhiker could in theory take you back to your house at gunpoint... where your family is.
I hear ya. My view on this--and lots of other things--is informed by my particular surroundings. I was raised and currently live in relatively small and safe college towns. They are not representative of many other places. The day to day stress of living in a city would inevitably change a person. Every time I go to one I wonder why in the heck anyone would ever choose to live there. Too many people. Too little space. Too fucking precariously fragile, IMO.
 

mistermikev

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I hear ya. My view on this--and lots of other things--is informed by my particular surroundings. I was raised and currently live in relatively small and safe college towns. They are not representative of many other places. The day to day stress of living in a city would inevitably change a person. Every time I go to one I wonder why in the heck anyone would ever choose to live there. Too many people. Too little space. Too fucking precariously fragile, IMO.
well it's not ALL bad. that said I don't live in LA and would never go back there... I guess Phoenix is a "small town" by comparison. But those lessons... they have stuck with me... I used to say hello to folks passing on the street and feel guilty if I didn't... know I don't even look them in the eye. Just how it has to be. That said... I make a point to overcompensate when I go back to my hometown to visit... I guess just to feel connected to that old me.
 




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