What is your honest opinion about the LP Modern?

redking

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I would get a 60's standard before that unless you are sure that it is the answer to all your dreams and you will shred your ass off with it. Otherwise I think you would take a big hit on resale.
 

redking

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Bingo.
If I want a "modern" or updated style, it would be a PRS, ESP, or something like that.
Same reason Fender offers "Parallel Universe" and "Alternative Reality" models in limited runs, but still limits them to meldings of classical styling.
Anything outside of traditional designs are generally limited run like the reissued HM Strat with Floyd and humbuckers, or the Blacktop with 2 or 3 humbuckers.
People don't go to Fender and Gibson for trend-setting designs.
Great point - really, a modern Les Paul is basically a PRS. I could envision myself having one of each at some point.
 

diogoguitar

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My opinion is if you’re looking for the best playing and sounding AND looking Les Paul that you will most likely keep, GET A USED CUSTOM SHOP 57, 58, They’re the best deal going. I’ve owned 2 Norlins and a bunch of USA Trads, Trad Pros and Standards. My ‘58 that I acquired lightly used (a 2013 I bought in 2017) for $2700 is the best Les Paul I’ve ever owned. It weighs 8.5 lbs. NEVER goes out of tune. It’s very comfortable for a 65 year old guy like me to use all night and it’s the best sounding Gibson I’ve ever owned and I own or have owned dozens since 1966. My other two I currently own are a 2012 Pelham Trad Pro that I’m hanging onto because it’s a beauty and plays great. But it’s very heavy. I know this has been said (and argued about) many times, but the Custom Shop guitars are leaps and bounds above a USA. Less is more.
That is actually a good point. I almost bought a used R7 for $3k. I was too afraid to test out the "big" neck, but in hindsight I should have tried. I'm totally fine with the 1.01" thick neck from my traditional.

I'll keep an eye on the market now.
 

diogoguitar

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I would get a 60's standard before that unless you are sure that it is the answer to all your dreams and you will shred your ass off with it. Otherwise I think you would take a big hit on resale.
hehe, I actually did get a Standard 60's.
Although I saw many stories that Gibson improved their QC, I was disappointed with the fit and finish of the specific guitar I got, so it had to go back.

Also, not that it matters that much, but seller rounded down the weight by half a pound.
 

redking

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hehe, I actually did get a Standard 60's.
Although I saw many stories that Gibson improved their QC, I was disappointed with the fit and finish of the specific guitar I got, so it had to go back.

Also, not that it matters that much, but seller rounded down the weight by half a pound.
That's disappointing. On average QC could go up with the odd guitar slipping past the goaltender. Also, I would think the retailer should be the first line of defense to send anything back that didn't meet a certain standard for their shop.
 

diogoguitar

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That's disappointing. On average QC could go up with the odd guitar slipping past the goaltender. Also, I would think the retailer should be the first line of defense to send anything back that didn't meet a certain standard for their shop.
I agree with that. Like, one of the issues was the pickups came with the wiring mixed up (bridge and neck came reversed). This could have easily been caught by the dealer.

If it was just tthat one issue alone I would have sucked up and kept the guitar. but then there were like 5 other small issues that it wasn't just a matter of me doing some half hour work to correct... it was more of a 2-2.5 hour luthier job to make it right.

And then there was the weight of the guitar, 220g/0.5lb heavier than advertised.
At that point I was like, ehhh
 

MP4-22

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I agree with that. Like, one of the issues was the pickups came with the wiring mixed up (bridge and neck came reversed). This could have easily been caught by the dealer.

If it was just tthat one issue alone I would have sucked up and kept the guitar. but then there were like 5 other small issues that it wasn't just a matter of me doing some half hour work to correct... it was more of a 2-2.5 hour luthier job to make it right.

And then there was the weight of the guitar, 220g/0.5lb heavier than advertised.
At that point I was like, ehhh
I wouldn't give up on the 2020's... I have two and they are awesome. Said you had a traditional already, a Modern might be a cool change of pace. I'd have bought one if it was a flame top.
 

PRSWILL

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The Modern is interesting- The taper on the back is cool, Ebony fretboard is awesome, the push pull config is interesting. I am not a Burstbucker fan though- if Icould get 490/498's in one, I'd be into it- and they don't have a good flame top version do they? I have a hard time paying that kind of money without seeing the wood grain - just me.
 

diogoguitar

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quick update for everyone.

I tried to negotiate the price a bit, but the seller was pretty firm on the price. No deal.
I'm surprised he didn't budge since I know the guitar has been there for at least 10 months now.

Oh well. I think I'll just hold on to it. I know a Standard HP will pop up soon or later.
 

JMB1984

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The Gibson Les Paul Traditonal Pro V is pretty close to the previous push/pull pot Standard from 2018 or 2019 (Henry era). It just doesn’t have the neck joint and Ebony board on the new Modern. The neck joint wasn’t done right to be effective IMO. It was better on the old HP models and they should have stuck with that design, except without the HPs wider neck as they are doing with the Modern.
 
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Max Max

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I really wanted to like it, was looking for a Les Paul for hard rock and metal, and I loved the Pelham blue and red finishes. But both times I played it in the store, I didn’t love it. Hard to pointpoint why, the neck just didn’t feel as good as other Les Pauls and didn’t sound super inspiring. I might have just gotten a dud with a bad setup though. Would love to try one that’s been set up properly.
Frankly, others do the hard rock/metal thing better than Gibson and they know it. Hence the revamp of Kramer.
 

InTheEvening

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Frankly, others do the hard rock/metal thing better than Gibson and they know it. Hence the revamp of Kramer.
I got one of the Kramer Baretta reissues a few months back and it blew me away. Not gonna lie, it nailed those hard rock tones better than any other guitar I own. It had a really aggressive bite and crunch to the tone. The Duncan JB def helped with that tone. I sold it to help fund an LP but really regret letting that one go.

I found an original 1987 Baretta which needs some set up work and I want to get a Duncan JB to replace the EMG it came with, but I’m hoping to make that my hard rock and hair metal axe. I may even get another Gibson Kramer reissue since I had such a good experience with the last one. I’d love The 84 reissue model in red.
 

JMB1984

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I think the ideal Modern could be achieved by improving some key features and ditching a few others:

-Improve the neck joint like the Axcess/Discontinued HP
-Provide both 50s and 60s neck profiles just like the Standard line to accommodate players with differing size and fit needs (Stop treating slim profiles as the only way to go on a “modern“ guitar when people are different).
-Ditch the asymmetrical profile and compound radius neck (People are pretty indifferent on these things and the opportunity cost is not offering 50s and 60s neck profiles to accommodate more players.)
-Offer flamed tops with some traditional and some new finishes (think 2013 era Standard).
-Include the solid or metallic colors at a lower price point (think 2011-2012 Standard & Traditional which offered ebony and gold tops)
-Push/pull pots can be included (enough people seem to like these and the rest will either replace them or just buy the Original series Standard)
-Rosewood or ebony fretboards are both good.
 

diogoguitar

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Yeah I agree with you that the axcess should go back and they should ditch this intermediate access heel joint.

I actually appreciate the compound radius thing. It should cost them nearly zero extra but it's a nice feature to have for modern players (I like my action very low)

Yeah, going back to flame tops, especially for the kind of money they are retailing ($2,800 currently).

And yes love the ebony board and real pearl inlays.



I think the ideal Modern could be achieved by improving some key features and ditching a few others:

-Improve the neck joint like the Axcess/Discontinued HP
-Provide both 50s and 60s neck profiles just like the Standard line to accommodate players with differing size and fit needs (Stop treating slim profiles as the only way to go on a “modern“ guitar when people are different).
-Ditch the asymmetrical profile and compound radius neck (People are pretty indifferent on these things and the opportunity cost is not offering 50s and 60s neck profiles to accommodate more players.)
-Offer flamed tops with some traditional and some new finishes (think 2013 era Standard).
-Include the solid or metallic colors at a lower price point (think 2011-2012 Standard & Traditional which offered ebony and gold tops)
-Push/pull pots can be included (enough people seem to like these and the rest will either replace them or just buy the Original series Standard)
-Rosewood or ebony fretboards are both good.
 

bytemare

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Hi, I have a les paul modern. It wasn't by choice, it just kind of showed up. That said, I like mostly "modern" guitars and I'm quite happy with the modern. I wasn't wild about the color choices (I would like a burst , flame top, fancy colors, etc), but I have the admit, the burgundy against the ebony fretboard and mother of pearl just looks really stunning and very classy. The asymmetrical neck felt just slightly strange at first, now I'm used it. I don't know it's really more comfortable or not, but it's fine. The neck joint definitely is an improvement for playing the upper frets, especially if you have small hands. The actual neck bump is smaller and obviously the body has that cut you can see. It looks kind of awkward to be honest, but it helps and I can play stuff on the modern that I cannot play on a traditional les paul.

Electronics are interesting. I LOVE these pickups. They are called burstbucker but I think they are a newer version. Awesome. I also normally love push/pull pots, but I do not like the them so much on the modern -- they aren't true coil split, but rather when activated send one coil through a high cut filter. So you don't lose volume (good) but to me it sounds a bit muddy.

I really like this guitar and (most of) the modern features. Just before getting this, I had the Epiphone modern. Also great, flawless, excellent quality control. I compared the two side by side and they were pretty similar, though there were a few differences.

I would have loved to have picked up one of the HP standards, oh well I missed out but this modern is pretty close, sans flame top :)
 

moreles

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The upcharge for a frivolous feature set and somewhat ugly finishes makes these a non-starter for me. They're obviously perfectly fine guitars, but I don't find them attractive, would never pay a premium for the features, which are to me irrelevant and probably a resale negative... why buy one? If you want a really modern guitar, a LP variant is hardly your best choice. It's a super-retro, almost antique design, and the Modern just throws some trivial contemporary bits on to that dated platform. Honestly, an SG is a way better "modern" LP -- which is why it was built to begin with. I have a great old SG (LP/SG Custom) and I prefer the design, playability, and sound to most LPs. "Modern..." right.
 

LeeB

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I've got my hands on a 2020 Burgundy epi modern and she rocks, plain and simple. But then I'm an SG man so what'd I know
 

diogoguitar

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update from the OP: I got a minor discount on a LP Modern, enough for me to move the needle and get it.
I'm very happy with it. I've owned it for about a month now. Completely different from my Traditional, but still feels and sounds like a Gibson.
I love the feel of the ebony fretboard.

Pics don't do justice to this faded pellam blue finish. It's gorgeous in person. Kind of looks like lake place blue on fenders,

1615917872434.png
 


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