What is your honest opinion about the LP Modern?

HomerThompson

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why not buy an epiphone then customise it way you like. My number 1 guitar that i take to studio or gigs is my suhr. I feel you really cant go wrong with a used suhr guitar. I do have les pauls but i only play them at home. Firstly cause they are fragile, million things can go wrong but with suhr ur pretty good to go. I used to use an epiphon.
My epiphone les paul was the first guitar i bought 23 years ago, and i still play it today
 

Mockbel

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Honestly, I would never consider one.. actually I still don’t see Gibson hitting this “modern” realm as a right decision.. People (or at least majority) buy Gibson for the “Traditional “ vibe they have.. If I want a modern single cut, I would choose an ESP Eclipse over any modern Gibson
 

Yamaha R1

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I ask this because I'm considering getting one, but feel like it could take a long time if I decide to resell it as used a couple of years down the road.

Since I'm so activelty trying to get a new LP, I follow the key dealers' stock daily. Currently, the only two guitar LP types I can think of that aren't selling so fast are the custom shop ones and the LP Modern

I can understand not many people can throw $5-6k on a custom shop every day, but how about these $2800 LP Moderns?
Not a lot of people can spend the $2800 either, but the 2.5k standards are selling like hotcakes...

So... what's your honest opinion about the LP Modern? Will it be hard to sell down the road?
I'm lefty, if that matters...

post script: I've sold like 5-6 guitars over the last 3 years... and I was quite surprised how fast my guitars sold. I guess lots of people have a similar taste?
post script 2: i have a LP traditional with a nice AAA top, so I don't have a G.A.S. for a good looking les paul.
I think a lefty is a hard sell in itself as the majority are right handed. For me, I would buy a 1950’s Standard reissued for the historical build and features but my next lp would be a modern for the modern upgrades.
 

CB91710

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Honestly, I would never consider one.. actually I still don’t see Gibson hitting this “modern” realm as a right decision.. People (or at least majority) buy Gibson for the “Traditional “ vibe they have.. If I want a modern single cut, I would choose an ESP Eclipse over any modern Gibson
Bingo.
If I want a "modern" or updated style, it would be a PRS, ESP, or something like that.
Same reason Fender offers "Parallel Universe" and "Alternative Reality" models in limited runs, but still limits them to meldings of classical styling.
Anything outside of traditional designs are generally limited run like the reissued HM Strat with Floyd and humbuckers, or the Blacktop with 2 or 3 humbuckers.
People don't go to Fender and Gibson for trend-setting designs.
 

sparky2

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I have thought about it quite a bit, and I really do like the Les Paul Modern.

The versatile tones offered via the push-pull pots make it a performance & studio winner.
The light weight is is a big plus for me.
My back can't take heavy guitars anymore.

:)
 

goodguy

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I’d get a PRS McCarty 594 (or any PRS) before I bought an LP “Modern”. Much better guitar, will hold it’s value better, no headstock break possibility. PRS just does “Modern” yet traditional thing so much better than anyone out there. That being said, I own the PRS 594 & a few other PRS’s and you really can’t match them for quality (but they cost more). I have owned every Gibson under the sun including a 2016 LP Trad HP (and eventually sold them) but recently bought the Gibson 50’s Standard and it’s awesome. So good, it may allow me to sell my 594 - but I am into more of the traditional mojo. As good as it may be, “Modern” Gibson stuff loses value quicker IMO since people just don’t see Gibson as owning that “Modern” genre. That all being said, buy a guitar that YOU dig and not what people online say - if the Modern LP speaks to you, get it -but- you owe it to yourself to seriously look at PRS (especially the 594). And I was not a PRS fan before my 594 & still love the Gibson history and vibe but can’t deny the PRS just a superior guitar in almost every way.
 
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keys88

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I might be in the minority but I think it’s in Gibson’s best interest to have a “modern” line (even if they don’t fly off the shelf as fast as the other models), for 2 reasons specifically.

1 - It gives Gibson a platform to add new features without mucking up the standards or traditionals. The standard should be the baseline current production model. The traditional (or whatever they want to call it) should be the model with more historically accurate features. And then the modern can be the line where they try things like robot tuners, PCB electronics, plug-and-play pickup switching systems, wild finish colors, etc.

2 - It gives Gibson a chance to appeal to people shopping for other guitars like a PRS. They don’t want historic. They don’t want a heavy body. They want a guitar that plays fast, has a cool finish, and has a bunch of onboard tonal options. The point isn’t to sell a traditionalist on a new modern design, it’s to sell a PRS guy on a Gibson.

Now, as far as resale goes, I think you probably already know the answer to that. It might be easier to sell it on Reverb or eBay because you have a wider audience than trying to sell it locally. But it’s probably not going to sell as fast as something like a standard, especially for a lefty.
 

Cory

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I personally don’t understand what Gibson is going for here with the modern line in terms of aesthetics - I feel like they had a chance to do something really cool/unique with this line, but they took the poker chip off and put on clear knobs...‍♂ - is that really the best they could come up with? And the burst finishes...just awful in every way - they should have kept pulling on the “axcess” string - those have different/modern features, but still look like a badass Les Paul with a mix of traditional (i.e. iced tea burst) and modern (i.e. gun metal grey) finishes.
 

bentfinger

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The fact that the moderns are sitting on the shelf to some degree must say something.
Can I suggest that you have a good old comparison session.
Make a right pain of yourself and try all the LPs the shop has got and try more than one place if you are able.
It also depends what you want it for (apart from playing !). If you are like me you Will know when you've found the one. Good luck
 

jtees4

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Yep, been playing Les Paul's for 15 years and owned a dozen or so of them. No headstock breaks, or any breaks of any kind. I don't baby them, but I am also not really hard on them, I mean why would you throw your guitar around... right...

If you trip and fall down, you could break your wrist, your arm, or even get a concussion if you hit your head, which is to much drama for me. I have seen it happen all to often, so I should just stay put until nature/evolution fixes the problem with humans getting broken bones or concussions by accident.

If your not buying a Gibson Les Paul because of the headstock thing, then you should also be wearing a helmet, wrist braces, as well as knee and elbow pads everywhere you go.

All kidding aside... just get an Epiphone Les Paul and your problem is solved since the headstock angle is less.
Somehow the Stradivarius violins are the most sought after, and they are also extremely fragile....but no one complains.
 

diogoguitar

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thanks guys. I considered PRS and ESP as options

PRS doesn't make 594 for lefties, no matter if you want to spend 3800 or 6000 on it. They only make it if you spend $9k on them. I mean, no

ESP is a closer candidate. I had an ESP original (MIJ with the esp logo on it). It sounded great, but didn't feel like a LP at all. Maybe because the body and neck were thinner than a strat. They have a body full thickness model, but the neck profile is still 0.87"/22mm at the 12th fret (vs 0.93 on a 60's standard model)

I think what I'm looking for is a guitar that isn't boat heavy, has a nice chunky neck, has a carved top and a TOM bridge. I don't even care if it's bolt on neck.
The more I think about it, the more I think about building another Warmoth guitar.
 

digitaljackson

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I bought my first Gibson Les Paul last year and researched the Modern along with the Standard models. I ended up with a 2020 tobacco burst 50s Standard and then bought a Pelham blue Epiphone Modern. This was all done online, so unfortunately did not get to actually play a Gibson Modern.

The biggest reason for choosing the Gibson Standard over Modern is that for a $2k+ price tag, I prefer a flamed/figured top. I'm quite happy with both guitars and very impressed with the quality/build on the Epiphone. I actually play the Epiphone Modern more than the Gibson Standard since I don't baby it as much... will generally use it for casual practice like sitting on couch while watching TV.

I like both the thick 50's style Gibson neck and the Asymmetrical Epiphone Modern neck. Compared to the Gibson Modern, Epiphone version does not have compound radius and is D shaped. My Gibson weighs 9 lbs and Epiphone is 8 lbs. I did add a poker chip on the Epiphone... seemed off visually without one.
 

objectivedynamics

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I have a Les Paul that suffered a headstock break but not the kind you might have expected.

I got it new in 1975 and the headstock broke in 1980. I have to admit that in those days I could be really rough with it, something that I'm not proud to admit today.
The only reason I mention it is because my rough treatment did result in the headstock break but this split in a line down the back of the headstock.
The veneer was bent but the split behind it ran down from the top of the headstock to a point about halfway down. The joint to the neck was unaffected!
Fortunately for me, Manchester, UK luthier Gordon Smith fixed it for me for (iirc) £10. The repair is still strong and the guitar plays as nice as it ever did.

Happily, I grew up after that and stopped being stupid with it
 

Bend'n'Slide

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As others have noted, the Modern series inherited most of the features of the pre-2019 “Standard” (and/or HP) models when the Originals series evolved from the “Traditional” models.

I guess the main aesthetic difference was that the old Standards, despite the modern features, were still available in some finishes that at least looked like classic Lesters, as well as the more funky finishes.

I don’t think it was unreasonable of Gibson to want to visually differentiate the Modern series from the Originals series, at least until the two new ranges were clearly established in the mind of the guitar-buying public!

I have a ‘16 Trad and a ‘14 Standard. I can take or leave the asymmetric neck carve (but I don’t mind it) and the push-pull coil-split / out-of-phase is never going to sound like a Strat or a Tele but it does give some useful tonal options. The hollowed-out tone is quite good and I rather like that I can get a good approximation of the Knopfler “Money for Nothing” cocked-wah tone without anything more than some gain and reverb from the amp, just be tweaking the guitar! :cool2:

It’s very much a personal decision for the OP...

Play a few and see how they feel; is potential resale value a big factor? Does the modern play well for you...? Will it make sounds that you like...?

If they’re potentially cheaper in the stores is it worth looking for an even cheaper used one??
 

Adinol

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.

Eh, they didn't fix the big flaw of a fragile headstock on the 'modern'. Still too much drama for me.

Make sure you are ok with the drama and risk of buying/owning a Gibson headstock guitar.
Many undisclosed repairs out there getting passed on to unwary buyers.
Tough guys will tell you they have never had a problem the whole time they owned their Gibson and didn't worry about babying the guitar ... but many get broken during shipping while selling, get returned for a full refund, insurance only covers the repair not the value lost. So much Drama.


.
I wouldn't not get a Gibson, just because it has a fragile headstock. It is a flaw, true, but life's too short.

That would be like not having a girlfriend because women are too fragile, or whatever.

For every Gibson that had its headstock broken there must be 100 Gibsons that are holding up just fine.

I ask this because I'm considering getting one, but feel like it could take a long time if I decide to resell it as used a couple of years down the road.

Since I'm so activelty trying to get a new LP, I follow the key dealers' stock daily. Currently, the only two guitar LP types I can think of that aren't selling so fast are the custom shop ones and the LP Modern

I can understand not many people can throw $5-6k on a custom shop every day, but how about these $2800 LP Moderns?
Not a lot of people can spend the $2800 either, but the 2.5k standards are selling like hotcakes...

So... what's your honest opinion about the LP Modern? Will it be hard to sell down the road?
I'm lefty, if that matters...

post script: I've sold like 5-6 guitars over the last 3 years... and I was quite surprised how fast my guitars sold. I guess lots of people have a similar taste?
post script 2: i have a LP traditional with a nice AAA top, so I don't have a G.A.S. for a good looking les paul.
Just buy one at the Guitar Center and take your time to decide if you like it enough to keep it. They have a 45 day return policy, no questions asked. And for a guitar like that (costly, with fragile headstock) also get the Pro Coverage. If it breaks and can't be fixed, they replace it.
 

Geronimo

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I ask this because I'm considering getting one, but feel like it could take a long time if I decide to resell it as used a couple of years down the road.

Since I'm so activelty trying to get a new LP, I follow the key dealers' stock daily. Currently, the only two guitar LP types I can think of that aren't selling so fast are the custom shop ones and the LP Modern

I can understand not many people can throw $5-6k on a custom shop every day, but how about these $2800 LP Moderns?
Not a lot of people can spend the $2800 either, but the 2.5k standards are selling like hotcakes...

So... what's your honest opinion about the LP Modern? Will it be hard to sell down the road?
I'm lefty, if that matters...

post script: I've sold like 5-6 guitars over the last 3 years... and I was quite surprised how fast my guitars sold. I guess lots of people have a similar taste?
post script 2: i have a LP traditional with a nice AAA top, so I don't have a G.A.S. for a good looking les paul.
 


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