What is the value of case candy?

monstruo_loco

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Am I the the only one who doesn’t like seeing or hearing “case candy”? I like the tags and documents, but can’t stand the name associated with it, not sure where it came from.
 

Justin_Case

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Case Candy has a value - putting a number on it is the question.

All else being equal, hypothetically given the chance to buy the exact same guitar with Case Candy, and another without for the same price, the one with the Case Candy will go first ever time.

The higher up the food chain, the more valuable Case Candy becomes, never mind COAs.
 
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efstop

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Am I the the only one who doesn’t like seeing or hearing “case candy”? I like the tags and documents, but can’t stand the name associated with it, not sure where it came from.
You probably don't like the term "baby photo" either, for the bench setup picture Gibson sends with a new guitar :)
It's just slang, and for a lot of us, "case candy" covers in two words, "all the stuff that it's supposed to come with in the case."

Maybe it came from Sweetwater purchasers, who received real candy in the case.
 

Renegade

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An actual dollar value would be tough...I think the value lies in how important it is to a potential buyer.
 

mudface

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I don’t sell or trade my gear.... I have given a couple to family and life long friends..... so resale value means nothing.... even less is the case candy.

DC2D0639-9E18-4835-833E-67EE70D208EC.jpeg


What’s in their cases is still there... the sales receipts are filed away for insurance purposes.....

When I buy it’s not something that crosses my mind unless I’m buying from Guitar Center.... I’ll use it as leverage to get a better deal from those GC jerks.... anyone else I don’t sweat them for it...;)
 

60'svibe

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For a nice USA (non custom shop) Les Paul in your price range, the case candy has zero dollar value. Don’t pass up an otherwise good deal because there’s no case candy.
Agreed. Those so-called credentials are superfluous. They could easily be faked repros with todays computers. Know the guitar itself and judge its qualities.
 

juanpuol

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It does to me. As may commented here already, it gives an impresion of a guitar being cared for.
I do pay attention to that and to the case.
That is the reason why I save all those things as well. They are in the pocket in the case, and I don't understand why people would throw them away as if they were taking tons of space in the case.

But I am not much of a gigging musician. but to me all that adds value, if not accountable, at least on having a complete product. Is the same value that sometimes buying something with the package does.
 

Duane.S

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I'd say that there is 2 extreme schools of thought:
The guitar is an investment that you can carefully play, you hope to get the maximum value for it when you resell it.
The guitar is a tool to make music, one day you'll discard it for a better one.

Obviously, there is many shades of grey in between those 2 statements. Once you have found where you are on the spectrum you'll know how important case candy is.
 

lwchafin

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Yeah, I'd focus on the guitar - I figure that if a convincing guitar can be counterfeited and convincing money can be counterfeited, counterfeiting case candy has to be pretty easy.
 

Brek

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about £300 lol, just seen an r8 for sale without coa, and that's how much it is under a properly priced one in UK.
 

3ChordMerchant

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My ‘13 Trad‘s certificate is the same as my birthday .. what were the odds! But because the ‘cert’ was displayed it did seal the deal. Granted , the ’provenance ‘ is only for me .
“Dirty Candy” is a beautiful MNT Caramel Burst.
I would add that ‘case candy’ is only important if it’s important to you. It only adds value only if it adds value to you.
 

jk60LPTH

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Am I the the only one who doesn’t like seeing or hearing “case candy”? I like the tags and documents, but can’t stand the name associated with it, not sure where it came from.
Not a fan of the term either. Sounds too much like something that originated at 'Joe's Used Cars and Guitar Sales'. When I go on a website and look at guitars, and half of the guitars have 'Minty', or some other meaningless adjective, it turns me off, just like when the seller's ad has listed for the description the copy-and-pasted from Gibson's sales literature generic description covering all models for that year, including all the famous people who played it, etc., and even worse, when they copy and paste the wrong guitar description. It's fine for Gibson because they're selling entire lines of guitars, but if you're selling a guitar, I want to know the specifics of that guitar, the weight, the neck measurements at 1st and 12th, etc. because just saying the year of the neck it models doesn't cut it due to the wide variations within each year.
In closing, I just want to say to some of you, 'Thank you' for letting me vent, and to the rest, 'I apologize' for having you listen to this post.
 

( . )( . )

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I like having the candy, but it’s never made or broke a deal when I was buying or selling. Many buyers aren’t expecting it...when a potential buyer asks, and you as the seller say “no”, they still seem just as interested in my experience.

But like I said, I like having it, and am surprised how often it’s discarded, especially with newer guitars.
 

jamhandy

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I guess it depends on the brand of guitar and just what does it come with when it leaves the factory. If its some kind of COA that's cool but people don't usually care much for the paper, its the guitar they want.

Now with a G&L guitar, you can arrange with your dealer o make you exactly what you want. Then when shipped it comes with a build sheet stating all the stuff that in or on the guitar. That's a cool piece of paper and the only way to know later if it was a special order.

I have no idea what the super-priced Les Pauls come with, I'll never be able to afford one... but if it is anything that proves the model or value that was the original price, that might be helpful establishing value years and years from now.

I've often had the thought about a relic guitar, since its all beat to F when you get it, how to you estabish it was in this supposed very expensive and trendy fad of beating up guitars in this era of beating up guitars? If it dodn't have some paper work attached that says "this is a relic" then in 40 years its just another beat up guitar.

I like what somebody above said, that it sort of shows that the owner took a little better care of the guitar and cared for the guitar as a whole, included all the paperwork. I've bought used guitars before from the poriginal owner and the original sales receipt was in the case.

All that said, I discovered a 2018 Fender American Elite HSS Strat at a pawn shop... it had a broken string and looked lost. I saw "Fender" on the headstock and at first since it was a pawns shop I thought "oh, a Mexican Fender" so I picked it up to see the price tag... $675... I did a search on the serial number and discovered it was Fender's top of the line Strat before getting custom shop crazy. These are usually around the $1,900-ish price new. -- So I had them grab the case (the tag said it had one)... still had the original (very nice) Elite series case and inside was a fancy envelope with all the case candy that it would have came with from the factory as well as a COA. -- And the guitar was in mint condition (still had the plastic on the PG which I quickly peeled off as soon as I got it home... ever try to peel that gunk off after a couple years?... eeck... break out the super-sized bottle of goo gone...)... My reaction when I opened the case compartment and found the paperwork was "hey, cool"... but I had already decided to buy the guitar. I think the case candy just had some "neat factor" to it. I don't know if the COA will have any scope on the value in the future. This one is a kepper and I'd be stupid to sell it, so since its gonna be a keeper, the paperwork doesn't mean much.

I guess if you want to buy new, sight unseen, sound unheard, touch unfelt off the Internet, and as soon as you get the guitar it is now "used" and worth about 30% less... and you're good with that... case candy isn't going to improve your depreciation on the instrument.

But if you buy used and let some other clod take the 30% depreciation, you can sell the guitar for exaclty what you paid for it, and if several years pass, maybe a few dollars more... and still the case candy isn't going to make it or break it if you hate the guitar enough to let it go or sell it.

My only tip is... go to a store, play it, and if it has "soul" buy it or put it on layaway. Playing Russian Roulette with your hard earned cash and buying sight unseen, sound unheard, touch unfelt off the Internet makes no good business sense to me. Its a chance you might get a dud, then all the emotions and disappointments as you box it up and send it back to where ever it came from.

Guitar Center (also known as Musician's Friend) are notorious for losing all the stuff that came with the guitar. As someone noted above, they bought a Historic guitar and it didn't even come with the correct Historic case. I avoid Guitar Center/Musician's (un)Friend(ly) at all costs. They only use UPS as a shipper... the last package they sent me was a $230 analog delay, the guy knocked on the door and didn't give me 3 seconds to get there... and left my package on the stiars... in the rain... luckily I was home. Plus the lasy pedal I bought from MF was a "open box"... called and asked them what condition it was in "otherwise mint, but was a store demo"... ok... so I bought it... got it and it looked like someone had taken a rasp/file to the input jack and ground off 1/8" of the material... That's my GC rant, I don't do business with them anymore for this and many other reasons. But buying expensive stuff online, to me, is Russian Roulette. Too many chances of getting a dud or a guitar you just don't like for any reason you can name.

My 2 cents...
 

jamhandy

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I just remembered... When G&L came out with the George Fullerton model the very first ones shipped with a red cover book by George Fullerton. I guess that book, as shipped with the first few GF's might be considered part of its "case candy"

I carefully packed that book away and all the paperwork that came with the guitar.

The GF model was a Dale Hyatt idea... the GF isn't really much different than a regular factory legacy model. But the first few Fullertons had soft-vee necks (not all later editions did)... Mine is a first-year Fullerton (1995), so it does, and I have a 1996 GF that also does.

To be even one more step anal retentive, I still have the original box my 1995 Fullerton shipped in from G&L. The guy I bought the guitar from always kept a lot of his stock in the case and in the box at his store,so when I bought it, it had the box, too. I don't think the box is going to add anything but sentimental value for me as I bought it from a store where I had bought my first electric guitar in 1975... But to me, I won't be throwing out the box... and its best value is probably fire starter... LOL

(Note all the G&Ls still in boxes along the wall in the background, haha)
Milt Smith, Smith Music, Portland, Michigan the day I brought home the G&L GF model... (no longer in business, Milt passed away a couple years ago. He was one of the very first G&L dealers anywhere and had ties to both Dale Hyatt and Leo Fender as personal acquaintances
IMG_2646-with Milt.jpg
.

I wanted to add one other thing... The guitar was brand new in the case, in the box... in 2004... when I bought the guitar from Milt. (Yes, he had had it for 9 years). -- To top that one, I came back a few years later and bought a 1988 Leo Fender signature ASAT (like and ASAT Special but a metal PG and Leo's siggy on the upper horn)... That was 2011, the day of my mom's funeral. That was the first year of any G&L Leo siggy, and Mil had had that one for 23 years... in the case, in the original box... still got the box for that one, too...

1988 G&L Leo Fender Signature.jpg
 
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