What happened to this guitar?

Roxy13

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@ cooljuk, were you talking about the side of the fb on the treble side where the fb meets the body? The last one with a fb inlay? If so I noticed it too but wasn't sure why it was there.
 

cooljuk

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Oh, sorry, I was referring to the sides of the FB, not the playing surface of the board. ...on the surface with the side dot markers. I should have been more clear.

I've seen several with more wood removed here between the fret ends, rather than evenly along the edge. I started seeing this more, when I moved out to the desert. Every guitar out here has fret sprout, it seems, so I'm guessing monkey business is right. Sandpaper, maybe?

I've got a Stew Mac file, I take the sprout off with. It's smooth on all four sides, to not scrape the top past the neck joint or the headstock beyond the nut, and about 7-8" long so it's never sitting on only one or two frets. Works well to take down the sprouted material fast. Leaves rough work that needs additional cleaning up but it works.
 

cooljuk

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A former luthier I worked with had a trick with scotch tape for taking down sprout on lacquered maple FBs without touching the finish. That was cool!

I'd love a trick of how to address bad sprout on bound necks, without replacing binding. If I go to a pawn shop out here, pretty much every bound neck guitar will have a single crack in either the lacquer or both the lacquer and binding, right at each fret end on both sides, where the board has shrunk around the fret. They have that feel of speed bumps down the binding. All I've figured out, so far, is oil the board and hope it swells up a little.
 

jkes01

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Suhr looks like someone took sandpaper to the fret ends to correct sprout, but they took it to the extreme. All those “speed bumps” where the sandpaper skipped over the harder material. :doh:
 

Tone deaf

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From the factory, at that price point that guitar should have been magnificent.

I think Dave got it right, the previous, previous owner probably broke the truss road and the games began. Therefore, the current fingerboard, frets, neck and headstock finishes are not Surh factory quality. The 'quality' of the finish of the luthier who did the repair might leave you wondering about how good all of the aspects of the repair actually are.
 

Bobby Mahogany

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@ErictheRed :
I wonder what Suhr would say.
If that guitar was made in 2019, shouldn't it have been repaired / neck changed under warranty?
And maybe they would still help you get the guitar up to specs by taking care of it?
Some manufacturers just don't like their product going around "defective".
I know some won't touch an instrument that has been worked on but
they might decide it wasn't right from the manufacture since it had problems
and offer to fix it for free?

:dunno:

Certainly worth a try.
:thumb:
 

rabidhamster

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The nut looks like it was replaced for huge strings and someone used way too much super glue then had some, uh, trouble trying to clean it up.
 

ErictheRed

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@ErictheRed :
I wonder what Suhr would say.
If that guitar was made in 2019, shouldn't it have been repaired / neck changed under warranty?
And maybe they would still help you get the guitar up to specs by taking care of it?
Some manufacturers just don't like their product going around "defective".
I know some won't touch an instrument that has been worked on but
they might decide it wasn't right from the manufacture since it had problems
and offer to fix it for free?

:dunno:

Certainly worth a try.
:thumb:
Yeah it's all kind of odd, Suhr says it was made in 2019 but there's no record of warranty work or whatever. I don't really care, I'm just going to mail it back for a full refund (kind of a pain, but oh well). I've been in contact with them by email and if they were to reach out to me and offer to work on it from their end I would accept, but I'm not going to ask as I don't think it's their responsibility.

The guitar sounds great. I already have a Suhr Modern Pro HSH but don't need the middle pickup (which just gets in my way), so I was looking for a Modern HH to trade it with. My Modern Pro has about the most impeccable fit and finish I've EVER seen on any guitar. This one used to be nice, I'm sure, but the neck just feels awful now, and who knows about the quality of the repair?

I did ask Suhr how much a new neck would cost and have yet to hear back. I might keep it if the seller refunds me enough to replace the entire neck (though I doubt that will happen), otherwise I'll just return it for a full refund.
 

Bobby Mahogany

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Yeah it's all kind of odd, Suhr says it was made in 2019 but there's no record of warranty work or whatever. I don't really care, I'm just going to mail it back for a full refund (kind of a pain, but oh well). I've been in contact with them by email and if they were to reach out to me and offer to work on it from their end I would accept, but I'm not going to ask as I don't think it's their responsibility.

The guitar sounds great. I already have a Suhr Modern Pro HSH but don't need the middle pickup (which just gets in my way), so I was looking for a Modern HH to trade it with. My Modern Pro has about the most impeccable fit and finish I've EVER seen on any guitar. This one used to be nice, I'm sure, but the neck just feels awful now, and who knows about the quality of the repair?

I did ask Suhr how much a new neck would cost and have yet to hear back. I might keep it if the seller refunds me enough to replace the entire neck (though I doubt that will happen), otherwise I'll just return it for a full refund.
I hear you.
If the guitar isn't a perfect fit otherwise it's better to ship it back and find a real good one.
As my mechanic says, when something goes sideways from the start, it will never be good.
:thumb:
 

Dolebludger

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To me the apparent scratches on the headstock where it meets the fretboard is proof positive that the fretboard has been replaced, and not very artfully.
 

ErictheRed

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To me the apparent scratches on the headstock where it meets the fretboard is proof positive that the fretboard has been replaced, and not very artfully.
It seems like the original fretboard, so I'm thinking that it was removed to replace the truss rod and then not replaced very well (which makes me doubt how well he truss rod repair went). Then the fretboard wasn't aligned perfectly and they tried to sand/file the areas where the neck and fretboard meet so that they seem to line up again.

Anyway Suhr said that a new neck would be $1,020 + shipping (and I assume tax also), so I'm going to ask for a $1,000 partial refund to replace the whole neck (and I'd ship the seller the original neck if he wants it), or just a full refund + return shipping.
 

Olds442

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too many nice guitars out there to worry about this one, send it back.
 

redking

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Eric, this might have been a fret board replacement, due to a truss rod replacement.

It looks as if a dual-action rod was installed in a single-action rod guitar. The head stock has the classic "bullet" relief, but the end of the fret board has a channel cut for the round head with the hex center of the truss rod.

You cannot buy the classic "bullet" bi-flex truss rods anywhere that I know of. you are stuck with either the old classic fender one-way rod that adjusts from the heel, or a two way rod.

When you have to replace a fret board on such a guitar, you have to deal with the existing routs, and you have to use a spindle sander to get that fret board end "scoop" just right.

As well, a new fret board fitting to an existing neck would explain the rough sides of the neck when it was sanded to match.
I think you are on to something here LtDave because John Suhr hates dual action truss rods and uses only single action truss rods in his guitars. I remember him talking about it at length on either a Pete Thorn or Tone Talk livestream within the last year.
 

Dolebludger

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This may be a little OT, but why does John Suhr dislike dual action truss rods?
 

redking

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This may be a little OT, but why does John Suhr dislike dual action truss rods?
He said that the extra cavity space that they take up inside the neck removes just enough wood to make many necks "dead" sounding. Goes back to his days before he had his own manufacturing company - he had another company contract manufacture necks and he said he noticed it when that company changed from single action to dual action truss rods. He said he got a bunch of necks from them that went "Thud!" when he tapped on the neck instead of getting a nice tap tone. He said it's his theory that he can't really prove, but he's stuck with that theory this whole time (going back probably 15 to 20 yrs).
 

Dolebludger

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Thanks, redking, I just love dual action truss rods — though not enough to pull a fretboard to install on a guitar of my own that doesn’t have one. But I am here to learn, so I like to hear all opinions. That is why I asked.
 


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