What first started the need for a guitar in your life?

JMP

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I heard the Led Zeppelin IV record in 7th grade. It blew my brain completely always. That was where it all started for me.
 

cigblues

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My love affair with the guitar started like this:
Back in the day when I was about 6 years old a boy in the suburb where I lived had been bought a black Strat as compensation for having undergone some horrible operation, which had left his chest badly scarred. I was blown away by the fact that if you connected this thing of beauty into the mains power you could sound like The Who, The Beatles or The Rolling Stones; well at least that is what the 6-year-old me thought it was for; oblivious to the fact that none of the above used Stats. I was totally electric guitar smitten.

Later in my early teens my mother bought me a catalogue acoustic, which had a pickup and came with a lead which I could plug into the family's radiogram; life was good, and I dreamed of a life on stage. An older friend of mine, who owned a blue Strat, a Selmer amp, and a van, had rented a church hall for us to practice in and at this point I was convinced that we were headed for rock’n’roll fame. We were going to be called the Larrytones; his name was Larry and mine was, and still is, Tony. However, shortly afterwards he got married and fathered a child, not necessarily in that order. My road to becoming a rock god ended up in a cul-de-sac. I blame it all on the blond hippie babe with the large, untethered breasts who gave birth to Larry’s daughter.

Later at age 18 I bought a Les Paul copy, which I believed in my ignorance was indistinguishable from the real thing; it was plywood, but I thought it was the dog’s appendage banging out the Stones’ Satisfaction on it. Aged 21 marriage and a mortgage came along, and guitars and impending rock stardom did not seem to feature in my life anymore, nor going to concerts and generally having fun living the full post-hippie sex, drugs and rock’n’roll lifestyle I had hoped for. Worse, sometime during those 5 wasted years of wedlock I lost the Les Paul copy and the cheap catalogue electro acoustic. I had money, a nice car, and a good job but no guitar, and a wife who did not share my values; she once told me that I could not play Zappa’s Zoot Allures in her company as it was obscene. The Torture Never Stops with background gasps and screams provided by Frank’s wife on that album seemed to cause my wife extreme distress.

At age 27 I reasoned that the financially ruinous cost of divorce was in fact a bargain in exchange for liberation and sanity and although impoverished by my decision pretty soon I found a wonderful music loving lady who shared my free spirited and hedonistic view of life, and although she was not a Zappa fan, she had no problem with my love of the guitar genius that was Frank. She was a Roxy Music fan, as was I, and we both loved Donovan’s Cosmic Wheels, so we were always destined to be as one. Some many years later she bought us tickets to see Zappa Plays Zappa with Steve Vai at the Royal Albert Hall, one of the greatest concerts I have ever attended, and even though she wasn’t a Zappa fan she admitted she now understood my love of Frank.

In the early to mid-80s, I managed to persuade a pawn shop owner I had befriended in Cardiff to let me buy a real Gibson “The Paul” together with a 100-watt HH Head and a Marshall 4x12 for the incredible sum of £120.00, which I paid off at the rate of £20 a week; yes, in the mid-80s you could buy stuff like that in pawn shops that cheap; I loved that guitar.

Now over 30 years later, no longer impoverished and still with the same music loving lady I now have several Gibsons, Strats, Teles, a beautiful PRS Custom 24 and a Steve Vai Jem. I no longer have the “The Paul” having part exchanged it for my first real Les Paul, a Joe Perry Signature in black burst; I still miss that guitar to this day. I am still a totally crap guitarist but since I gave up pretty much all illegal recreational highs my favourite drug is taken at least once a day through my Mesa Boogie; life is good
Man I must be on the entertainment forum. Great story and sound s like you have a great life man. Well, its going to be legal even here in AL soon but my friend told me he tried some with his workers and hated it. We can be hippies in our beliefs. We never shot anyone.
 

cigblues

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These went into my earholes as a kid:

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OIP.RXVLM2_QoyZ7rBA3bjc9GgHaHa

Rdb2fbf50f1893c147751a7a58b0d4779

Rf24c734e053ac794ec005008cac25e8e

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An when I realized it was possible to have your own guitar and attempt to make the glorious noises I was hearing I became obsessed with having one and learning to play. Got my first guitar in 1976. Got my first "real" guitar in 1977. Been a lifelong obsession I guess you could say.
Got an SG and Vibro champ 47 years ago. Gotta blame Columbia house. 12 free albums and another for one cent.
 
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TattooedCarrot

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Mid 1970's, I was about 10 years old and wanted a banjo for xmas. I have no idea why, we lived in Southern California and I knew nothing of banjo music. I just wanted one. My parents either couldn't find one or just knew better and they got me an acoustic guitar instead. I played that for a few years until my step-dad, who played a bit when he was a teen, collected his old daphne blue 1960's Fender Duo Sonic from his parents' house and let me use that. I promptly ruined it by taking it apart, spray painting it black, and stuffing a Dimarzio into it - I wanted to be EVH, not Dick Dale. I'm in my 50's now and not much has changed, I still keep acquiring guitars and butchering them with mods.
 

questionman

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I got really into rhythm and percussion growing up listening to Bob Marley and a LOT of bluegrass, but Zeppelin III really made me want a guitar. All I cared about before that was electric and this album delivered with Immigrant Song, Celebration Day, SIBLY, Out On The Tiles, but the acoustic stuff was mind blowing and had me hooked. I had to learn after that. 20 in house guitars and god knows how many over the years one MIGHT say this has grown into an obsession but no one has told me so lol
 

theycallmegio

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my parents moved to the states in the late 70s and my dad was heavily by American rock.

there was a lot of guitar-forward music in the house and I knew my dad thought it was cool. I wanted my dad to think I was cool too.
 

Thundergod

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I was born in the late 70s, good music in English reached my country with a huge delay (as did movies). Anyway when I was about 10 years old I learned about Angus Young, Slash and CC DeVille... I just had to grab a guitar. 3 years went by before I actually got my hands on an old acoustic and started playing. My first electric (an Epiphone special II) came in the late 90s...
 

AJK1

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I got sick of playing my tennis racquet to songs
 

01GT Eibach

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It definitely was not on a whim from me. I was always possessed by music. I felt the need as a 10-year old to play guitar like it was being commanded by God himself My parents did not want an electric guitar in the house so they were not getting me anything. Although, my uncle had a '62 Fender Duo-Sonic that he no longer played, and I begged him to borrow it from him at every family gathering. Finally he broke down and brought it to me to borrow, making very clear he was not giving it to me ... along with a huge heavy Gibson 2x12 combo amp that barely worked it, if you could even call it "working". Then the parents ponied up guitar lessons, and I was off. I played all the time, driving everyone crazy. I eventually scraped enough money to buy a huge used Peavy half-stack, that I used w/ a MXR Distortion+ and O/D Pedal ... it was loud, and I had good tone. As a 10-year-old, I was a MASSIVE fan of ... in order of discovery ... the Beatles, AC/DC (Bon Scott era), and then Rush. Along the way, of course ,was also Led Zeppelin and the Who. The Who's 1979 movie "The Kids Are Alright" was very influential on me; I saw it in the theater the day it came out (the Beatles "Magical Mystery Tour" was the double feature). Also having major impact were the midnight showings pf Led Zeppelin's "The Song Remains The Same" movie which had come out a few years earlier. By the time I was 13-years old, all I did was play and listen to music. In 1981 (15 years old), I bought a used 1979 Gibson SG Standard from Mike Varney (he was a neighbor of mine, and needed money to start up Shrapnel Records). The Duo-Sonic went back to my uncle, and I played the preverbal snot out of that SG for decades (still have it, and it is in good condition too, still plays great).
 

Oig

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I skipped school in 11th grade, and went to my friend's house to smoke and listen to Maiden. He didn't play but had a borrowed early 70's Yamaha Flying Samurai. Back then it was just a piece of junk (what I wouldn't give to have that thing now), but the bug bit and it bit hard. A couple of months after that I moved back in with my dad. Guitars and music were just about the only things we could agree on back then, so they became a way to bond. We live in different countries now, but 30 years later the real topic of conversation in any given phone call with him is still, you guessed it, guitars.
 

dro

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I'd have to say, All the artists on Ed Sullivan
 

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