What do you consider a low ball offer

splatter

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2009
Messages
5,203
Reaction score
4,473
for some perspective I think this needs to be discussed in percentages. Fo rexample if I'm selling something for $400 and you offer me $300 then you are asking for a 25% price cut .Thats obviousely a low ball offer.But if I'm selling something for $2400 and you offer $2300 thats only a 4% price cut and IMO not a low ball offer
I'm asking because I recently made an offer on something and I got no response . I didn't consider it a low ball offer and if I were on the other end of the offer I wouldn't have thought so either.
Also for me,if I receive an offer as long was it's not just super low I will respond. It just seems like the thing to so . IMHO its just rude not to.
 

Deus Vult

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Messages
18,563
Reaction score
32,203
Maybe it’s sold? Maybe you use hotmail and his filter sent your message to spam. Maybe it’s only been 8 hours and the guy is working. Maybe he was enjoying father’s day?

Need more information
 

Duane_the_tub

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
2,894
Reaction score
5,458
I think it depends on the asking price. If it's already a good deal, the seller's tolerance for haggling may be shorter. If someone puts a piece of used gear up at only slightly less than it would cost new, it's almost implied that there is room to negotiate. If it's already a big markdown, it's poor form to come looking for another substantial discount. I also think it's seller's discretion to respond to offers.
 

fry

Silver Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2011
Messages
3,195
Reaction score
5,117
The spam folder thing is the first thing I thought of. I had some things listed on craigslist over a period of weeks, no responses whatsoever. I thought it was odd. I went back later and looked in my spam folder, and there were quite a few messages asking about all the stuff I was selling. I had since sold everything, but I still went through and responded to all of the messages. It actually bothered me that all these people might think I didn’t care enough to respond.
 

MSB

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2015
Messages
4,010
Reaction score
4,657
It also depends how you offer it. There's a guy on my local CL who emails EVERYTHING I've ever posted for sale and offers half the asking price. I never respond to stuff like this, but after two or three emails about your product, he'll add that my junk is overpriced, but I could get rid of it today for his fair offer...smh.

If someone is selling a 300 guitar for 600 and you offer 250, I don't consider that low balling, that's fair market value.
 

Uncle Remus

Senior Member
Joined
May 5, 2016
Messages
1,359
Reaction score
2,851
Offering more than 20% off of the accepted value is rude in my opinion. I currently have a couple of things listed on reverb. They are the lowest priced items listed of their model and year, but I still get someone wanting a 60% discount. I just decided this time to change the listings to the least I will accept and not take offers.
 

fry

Silver Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2011
Messages
3,195
Reaction score
5,117
Offering more than 20% off of the accepted value is rude in my opinion. I currently have a couple of things listed on reverb. They are the lowest priced items listed of their model and year, but I still get someone wanting a 60% discount. I just decided this time to change the listings to the least I will accept and not take offers.
I pretty much never accept offers on listings I have on reverb or eBay. I usually have the lowest price for that item, or the best price based on the condition it’s in versus what else might be available. My asking price is rock bottom, if I don’t have the “make an offer” option on there, then any offers kind of piss me off. There are a lot of people that absolutely refuse to pay the asking price, it’s a psychological thing, I guess. I don’t understand it, if I see something I’m interested in at a great price, I will pounce on it.
 

Bytor1958

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
12,229
Reaction score
30,132
Some people put a price on something and expect that price. So making a offer lower than they put it up for might be considered a low ball offer. Did it say make a offer?

Everyone one wants something for nothing these days. I learned to price things higher so a lower offer is more acceptable. So if you price it at $100 but want $75 you have 25% to work with.
 

Ed B

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2008
Messages
13,552
Reaction score
10,651
I do not have a rule of thumb. I don't think a percentage is a good gauge. 25% on a fairly priced used LP Custom will be too much for me. A couple hundred, sure. I usually have a good gauge on what I need to spend on something. Getting it there or a little lower is great for me.

Every deal is different for me. Some items I scoop without making an offer. Some items I haggle. I feel a low ball offer is at least half of the asking price. I've never done that. I always put my best foot forward. I gave up on expecting others to do the same. :laugh2: I've had people low ball me on almost everything I've listed. I almost always reply. More often than not they were willing to pay close to my ask. Just taking a stab at getting lucky. It's not worth dwelling on.

If you really want an item. Don't play games. Buy it.
 

Roxy13

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2017
Messages
6,646
Reaction score
20,279
I look at as a percentage as well. If I have a $300 guitar on CL, please don't offer me $200. I watched the selling trends on it for 2 months before listing it, and my price is already a little lower than the others. And has leveled and crowned frets where the others look like someone has been playing the heck out of the them for 15 years. But, yes, an offer for $2200 on a guitar I had listed for $2400...I would probably take it and just be done dealing with the time wasters.
 

JTM45

Platinum Supporter
Premium Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2009
Messages
8,502
Reaction score
15,026
I’m open minded for the most part, if I have something for $1000 and someone offers $500, that’s pretty bad but if they offer $700 I may come back with $800 or $850 Nd try to strike a deal
 

Thundermtn

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2017
Messages
460
Reaction score
1,149
If something has been sitting there for months or in some cases years, offering 60% of current market is appropriate. It's going to be very competitive to a trade in from a store. Having a make an offer option means you're willing to take less, so.... haggling approved, trade plus cash, all sorts of stuff. Don't get offended, either counter offer or remove the option.

It's used stuff, and sitting for months means it is either an ugly duckling or the owner wants too much in the first place.

The buyer has no idea what the conditions are that pics won't show (truss rod maxed, won't intonate, floppy neck, etc....) and the fact that someone is selling it already makes it suspect as the current owner deems it a NON-KEEPER. It's a buyer beware world so getting a good deal is a must.
 

mdubya

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
19,029
Reaction score
30,880
If you are asking $400 for a $300 item, I have no problem sending you an offer for $250.
:dunno:

I have half a dozen items on my Reverb watch list that are a good $1000 over reasonable selling prices. I don't even make offers on items like that. But seriously, who are these jokers?
 

TheX

Voice of Reason
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Messages
24,761
Reaction score
44,707
It also depends how you offer it. There's a guy on my local CL who emails EVERYTHING I've ever posted for sale and offers half the asking price.
I have "that guy" local to me as well.
 

cherrysunburst00

I don't even care about the pat cictures anymore
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
16,795
Reaction score
33,552
This has been very enlightening for me. I've always thought 20% off (when given the make an offer option) was a relatively fair offer, fully expecting a counter. I now see that 20% is considered insulting.

I fully agree with @Ed B I recently got a Carr Mercury V. I wanted it, no silly rallying, I paid their price (and got a fair trade as well)
 

MSB

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2015
Messages
4,010
Reaction score
4,657
IME words in ads mean nothing these days, firm, no offers, no trades, etc. Anyone that expects more than shitheads is lying to themselves in most cases.

You would be surprised how many things I've bought over the years at ridiculous prices because I wasn't a dickhead and if we didn't reach a deal at that time, they had my info and knew where I stood and how to find me if they changed their mind.
 




Top