Weird reaction on fretboard after using masking tape

Brek

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Damn, did not know masking tape could mark a finish, was going to use some to protect the fret board while I polish the frets.
 

sasquash_

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Yes, very weird right? Maybe the fretboard is too dry? But still, I mean, baked maple is already sealed wood, it should be fine on its own without any maintenence, so why oil it in the first place?
 

Brek

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I will play it safe and get some of the 3M blue tape.
 

Roxy13

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It's not marking it. It sucks moisture out.

For whatever reason for me it's one size doing it more. It's all the same brand of tape though. So I can only guess one size has more adhesive or the composition is slightly different than the other sizes. But, every single time after I oil the board it's all back to normal.
 

Skit

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Come on people, the tape was only on for around 10 mins. tops. I have never seen anything like that, that's why I wanted to ask for advice. There is no way the tape can have such an effect on the fretboard. It will look OK after oiling probably, but do any of you get the same thing on baked maple fretboards? How is it possible for the tape to cause such a discoloration on the wood?
Freddy explained it to you but for some reason you refuse to listen.
 

pshupe

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Yes, very weird right? Maybe the fretboard is too dry? But still, I mean, baked maple is already sealed wood, it should be fine on its own without any maintenence, so why oil it in the first place?

Baked, roasted, torrefied maple does not have a finish. It is not really sealed wood. You can still oil it just like you do rosewood or other fret boards. Why do you oil rosewood fret boards? So it doesn't dry out or it darkens considerably and looks more rich?

It seems the consensus is that it has pulled the oils out of the board in those areas. So just oil the board or leave it the way it is. It's up to you.

Cheers Peter.
 

Freddy G

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Come on people,
Bad form right there my friend.

I have never seen anything like that
I have, and I explained it.

that's why I wanted to ask for advice.
And it was given.
There is no way the tape can have such an effect on the fretboard.
There isn't? Then what's the problem?

It will look OK after oiling probably,
Not probably...it will.

but do any of you get the same thing on baked maple fretboards?
Yes. All the time. Oh wait....I already said that.

How is it possible for the tape to cause such a discoloration on the wood?
already explained.
 

smk506

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I called a guy I know who works at Gibson and he said it happens all the time when they do fret work... something about the tape wicking moisture up.

Anyway, he suggested oiling the board with mineral oil, said it will remove any residue and fix the discoloration problem pronto.

Hope that helps.
 

ehb

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BBQ Maple is torrified. The fibers are stabilized by the process.

From a tonewoods web site on the interwebz...

  • Roasted wood is stable and resistant to humidity and temperature changes.
  • Hydroscopic cellulose is sealed so wood resists warp and movement.
  • Stiffness, strength, and integrity of the wood are maintained with no chemicals.
  • Vibrational testing indicates roasted maple has clearer tone than regular maple.

BBQ Maple ain't gonna absorb oil like one might think. It will be more on the fiber surfaces than absorption. Capillary action dictates that liquid will try ti fill spaces in a material even defying gravity. Think hurricane lantern or even desoldering braid. Walk through wet grass enough and Levi's can be wet to the knee when grass is only a few inches. Capillary action.

That being said, when you oil a BBQ board, the actual wood really ain't absorbing squat...the spaces are...

I do oil my BBQ boards mainly to clean with a plastic fiber brush. Slight oil can soften kank so it comes off easier with brush up against frets and such.

I take a section of handkerchief about size of a pack of smokes and dribble a few DROPS of mineral oil (Equate, constipation section at Wally, food grade (pure) 16oz, under two bucks, more than you'll use in a lifetime) and wad the rag and roll it in my hands so those few drops are evenly distributed in the rag. I will not recharge the rag for probably MONTHS. I wipe with pressure at string change to clean the kank... it will also slightly darken the BBQ maple. Makes next time cleaning easier with the slight oil residue on board... No, slighter than slight... Takes pressure to even get slight sheen of almost wet... Do not bathe a board in oil....

Now to the tape issue at hand...

More than likely the tape simply wicked some oil off the surface in that masking tape is fibrous if you examine close enough. The wood is perfectly fine.... BBQ Maple is hard and extremely stable... Prep you a rag as above, wipe the board, and just keep the little rag handy in a little jar or something. I keep mine in a small measuring glass like a double shot glass on the guitar bench at shop.... I wipe board with a paper towel after...

Heat and vacuum pretty much stabilizes hell out of dried maple....and it ain't changing back...


My method/practices/blathering may conflict to some extent with somebody else's practices or tea leaves readings... Cool. Don't care. My way works for me... Theirs probably for them...

Your call on what's right for you....

edro.
 

LtDave32

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Years and years ago, I was at a 7-11 a couple of miles from my family home where I grew up.

It was very near where the 22, 405 and 605 freeways intersect.

On leaving the 7-11, a fella with a map unfolded around his steering wheel called to me, asked me how to get on the 405 South.

The 7-11 was on 7th street, a beeline right to the freeways.

I told him to stay on 7th street, in 3 miles it will dump into all freeway on-ramps, he can pick up the 405 South right there.


I was born near there. I used to explore the flood control under the freeways as a kid. I used to jog the path along the freeways that run parallel to the 405. I'd been there all my life.



..the man asking directions argued with me. Wanted to pick up the 405 via ximeno, Los Coyotes diagonal North of the traffic circle.

I tried to tell him he didn't want to do that, it was a confusing mess. Just drive down 7th street in a straight line.

He argued with me still.


Good luck, Mr Man.
 

Wuuthrad

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Not a luthier but I’ve done quite a bit of finish and painting work. That blue tape can be bad for certain guitar finishes- nitro and shellac particularly. Some varnishes are ok with it, and most polys handle it well.

It’s house painting tape and designed for synthetic, enamel, or oil paint, which are generally much stronger than a nitro finish. You can get a specific luthiers tape called low tack.

But none of what I’ve mentioned is specific to fretboards, as I assume even low tack would lift some moisture on a normally treated fretboard.

You might consider a lacquered fretboard as some very well known players have done, especially if fretboard maintenance is not of interest.
 

mlimbolimbo

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The fretboard is oiled. The tape wicked oil from the wood, leaving it dry in spots. Apply oil. Dunlop packages lemon oil in a nice dispenser for guitar necks.
 


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