Vintage - Reissue blind listening test

Brek

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A is the real 60's, didn't peek honestly, both some on point. I have the same 2020 killer within a few numbers serial number as well.
 

captdan61

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Ten Guitars posted this, what do you guys think?

There is something in the harmonic content of guitar A that I like better. Not sure which it is but regardless of when the guitar was made. A is the gutar for me. If you like this kind of thing you know chasing the Vintage tone dragon check out "the Doug and Pat show" they go into great detail and I actually find some things that really help you get closer.
 

OBX351

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Sub'd for the reveal. Though it's pretty hard to tell the difference on youtube, even when the nineteen hundred and sixty has double wide pickups.
 

Liam

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I kind of cheated by spending most of a day playing an original 1960 Les Paul standard once (about 11 years ago maybe). Pretty sure I wrote about the experience on this forum at the time. It was such a nice sounding and playing guitar. Neck on the small side, tomato soup top, but a truly memorable time and instrument. I wish I could once more thank the friend that allowed me the opportunity, but grateful we got to do similar many more times.

So what did I learn today?

1. If you play a lot of 50s and 60s Les Pauls you get a bit of a feel for how they sound.
2. Gibson Custom Shop reissues are great guitars in their own right, and seem to be getting greater.
3. Many people prefer the sound of the reissues to the originals - and that's not wrong, it's just preference. If I prefer the originals mostly for their originality (and I don't know if I can break free of history enough to be so introspective) then I am even more wrong!
4. I am probably too fixated on late 50's Gibson Les Paul tone for my own good.
5. I even know why I'd prefer a '58 or '59 LP standard to the original in the video, but I am not in a position to own either year models.
6. Might be time to decide whether to get very rich, or develop a fixation with more attainable goals... I already have a lot of good sounding Les Pauls.

:D

Liam
 

BDW60

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Yay me! You may all address me as Sir Golden Ears in future correspondence.
 

rogue3

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Like i said,never any doubt in my mind.The burst(Guitar A).It helped that i actually played one once.I remembered it because back then,i didn't like it! So i wondered what all the hoopla was about,older guitars are better,and such.:hmm:.
But back then,i was also a novice player.

People's ears are seduced by the hotter sound of the repro,Guitar B,just like i was back in 1982.But there is the bait.

For example,at the time when i had a chance to purchase a 1960 original i really felt the more powerful sounding pickups,like Dimarzio Super Distortion HB's for instance,gave more,to these ears,so i thought back then.
Today,i would call them mud,except when you crank out balls to the walls...think Boston...then they wail.Different applications.

30 years on in playing i don't think that anymore.I prefer more detail and finger touch sensitivity.But those SD's DO have their place!

In the video,i definetely prefer Guitar A,the burst.The clean and bloom on the note,enhances the sustain.The distortion has more...not as thick,but,somehow richer sounding to these ears,in a different frequency range from the repro.More soprano.

Its really just a matter of taste in the end.I prefer Guitar A's taste today.

In 1982 i passed over the 1960 original,for 1400$,AND bought a brand spanking new 1982 Gibson Standard,loaded with Tim Shaw humbuckers for 1200$ because they had way more signal...and drove my amp into distortion a lot more.
All righty then.
Ironically,when i fell in love with the *new* Henry J. Gibsons(all mahoganey,lighter) in the late 80's,that 1982 Gibson Standard was the first one i got rid of.I changed over time.
 
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