Vintage Guitars in 50 years...

SkyDogJr

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The only point I was trying to make about the comparison of the Strad instruments and the 50's Bursts was that there was no comparing....other than the wishful comparison made by the people who have horded the Bursts of that era hoping they will command Strad kinds of prices in the future...

300 years from now, who knows...but I know I am not going to be here and neither are the people who have horded those Bursts, that in my opinion, deserve to be played rather than stored in a vault and brought out long enough to be photographed for a book.
 

GuitarMechanic

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300 years from now, who knows...but I know I am not going to be here and neither are the people who have horded those Bursts, that in my opinion, deserve to be played rather than stored in a vault and brought out long enough to be photographed for a book.

Yes they do desreve to be played just like a Strad is played and cared for by a concert violinist so in this way I suppose they are comparable... and I guess after rethinking they were tools for music just like a guitar is nowdays :hmm: just more handmade because there weren't really assembly lines back in 1666 ( :dude: )
 

DonLogan

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Liam, I thank you! Fascinating stuff.

Man, teachers get paid a lot in the states...
 

J.T.

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I somewhat agree with this. I own a 1968 BB Vette. And I have seen the prices for these fall dramaticly in the past couple yrs. And the damn thing just sits in my garage couse I dont want to pay the insurance prices to drive it. As soon as I say 427 the cash register starts ringing and my wallet shrinks a bunch.

You need to look into Grundy or Hagerty.
 

Kalamazuu

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I just finished watching a movie about violins, "The Red Violin" (great movie). And I don't think they will be worth all that much. Strads were amazing and are because of the sound, which if I recall I don't think anything today can reach. But vintage LPs are also famous for the great sounds, but there's been so many replicas and whatnot, they aren't any better.
I don't know if any of that made sense, I'm pretty tired.
Classical music will never die, it can't. And I don't think rock will, but there's a not a ton of followers (younger ones). And rock might not live, but not in the way many of us would hope or consider 'good rock', it's evolving just as classical music did from different eras.
 

MrMoolah

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The only point I was trying to make about the comparison of the Strad instruments and the 50's Bursts was that there was no comparing....other than the wishful comparison made by the people who have horded the Bursts of that era hoping they will command Strad kinds of prices in the future...

300 years from now, who knows...but I know I am not going to be here and neither are the people who have horded those Bursts, that in my opinion, deserve to be played rather than stored in a vault and brought out long enough to be photographed for a book.

Can't wait for reincarnation, if there is one. :slash: I'd love to see the world's tecnology 300 years from now. Maybe the air guitar will exist. :laugh2:
 

Bes628

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Well not with an attitude like that it isn't. I put up my guitars and Camaro, and didn't go to ART school , oh I wanted to but , it would have been a waste or time and money. ) . Mother was right I was young and stupid.

You can earn the money , you have a bigger chance of winning the lotto than becomming the next Slash.

This makes me want to put both hairs out of my head. EArning that money is possible ...if you apply youself to a work field that actually pays something ..you'll never do it teaching guitar , working in guitar store and gigging at the local bar on the weekends.

My niece recently graduated with a mechanical engineering degree and went to work for Boeing Aircraft. A 56-57 vintage GT is attainable now , if she was into guitars...she'll probally buy a new Porshe . Hopefully by the time she is 35 , she can buy 59 Burst if thats what she wanted .

But no.........the days of 1972 and 59 LP's selling for a song are over. Still if you work your azz off with a goal in mind I'm certain you can attain something simple as a vintage guitar , you can get what you want . :slash:

I appreciate the pep talk lol, but its not my financial future that im worried about, Im working a career i love (FOH/Monitor Engineer) and can make enough money to buy guitars I want. It's the life things, that will keep it out of range. I have parents with dimishing health and 4 siblings 12 and under, that I will be responsible for eventually.

Those are things, that will keep me from a Burst, but at the end of the day its just a guitar and not as important.
 

Toby

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I'm 29 by now and I'm really into Vintage guitars. I Know a few guys around which are too, all in my age.

I really think that the enthusiasm for old guitars (or guitars in general) depends on the music one is brought up with. My parents played music like the Beatles or the Stones whne I was a kid, so I got into that music and that specific sound at a very young age. I think this is the reason I never got interested in Rap or Hip Hop or stuff like that.

Starting to play the guitar at 9 years of age (20th anniversary this month :dude:) I made my guitar teacher play me easy Beatles songs because this was what I wanted to learn. Beeing interested in 60's music an sound I began to hear Hendrix, Led Zep and stuff like this.

In the mid 90's I got my first electric guitar beeing a Charvel Strat Copy. Though all the other guys at school played metal axes I wanted to have a more conservative instrument. :thumb:

When I was about 16 a R9 for me was the guitar to have, because I was very much into Led Zep, Gary Moore, early Clapton, and stuff. I made the decision to own a R9 once in my lifetime. This dream got fulfilled in October 2010 when I got my 2003 R9! :applause: I love this guitar and I will never give it away anymore.

Now I'm dreaming about buying a real Vintage 50's LP Junior single cut. But this could take me a few more years. But what I'm sure about is, that my R9 will be my No. 1 guitar, though a real 50's Junior wilol find it's way to my hands. :)
 

Robert Arthur

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$265 + $42.50 for the case



Probably not the best comparison to go for - teachers' relative salaries in the US have improved a bit since then. The average white male salary in the USA in 1960 was $4300 a year.



From the consumer price index, the multiplier is 7.58. So:

Guitar - $2035.20
Case - $322.15
Average annual salary - $32,594.00



Varies dramatically. Median is somewhere between $40K and $50K per annum.



$100 is $100, every year. What you can buy with it has varied over the years.



You're not that confused, pretty sensible questions I reckon. A new Les Paul Sunburst in 1959 cost about 6% of average annual income. In today's money that equates to about $2700, making the Historic Collection guitars a little more expensive than the real deal was in the late 60's. It also means the financial value of the real guitars has increased about 100 fold in 60 years.

Back in the real world, at the lower end of the food chain (that's where I live!) a 1959 Les Paul Junior was $132.50, equating to $1005.35 today. They currently fetch $4-5K in fair-good condition, so the relative value has increased about 4 fold.

Early 80's Tokais and JV Squiers have probably doubled in value since 1983. They cost about $200 new I seem to remember, which is about $450 in todays money. If they are nice they often exceed $1000 nowadays.

I don't think there are many guitars being made today that will generate the cache 50s Gibsons and Fenders did. And as I said before, they aren't going to make any more of them.

Liam
My 1978 Tokai "Springy Sound" st80 cost 80$(hence, st80) in 1978. I look at Ebay and see them going for over $1000 easily(prior to the 80's headstock change ST80).
 

Liam

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My 1978 Tokai "Springy Sound" st80 cost 80$(hence, st80) in 1978. I look at Ebay and see them going for over $1000 easily(prior to the 80's headstock change ST80).

OK, maybe quadrupled. $80 on '78 is about $280 nowadays.

DollarTimes.com | Inflation Calculator

Squiers and Tokais were a bit more expensive here in the UK back then. I've got 3 of the Squiers and love them too. They've gone up in value a fair bit as well.

Liam
 

Robert Arthur

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OK, maybe quadrupled. $80 on '78 is about $280 nowadays.

DollarTimes.com | Inflation Calculator

Squiers and Tokais were a bit more expensive here in the UK back then. I've got 3 of the Squiers and love them too. They've gone up in value a fair bit as well.

Liam
I just sold an E series Squire Strat from 84 for $200 to my nephew, and i'm kicking myself in the a$%..
 

ceeya68

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Have you tried Hagerty Collector Car Insurance ? The insurance on my 69 Chevelle Convertible 454 w/Muncie isn't that bad. They told me that as long as the horsepower was no more than that of a factory option, it didn't raise costs. But I don't know what the HP is since I didn't build the engine, so I had to guess.

[/thread_drift_off]

Thanx!!
 

proudamerican

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I think this is a good point and something I too was thinking.

However, Stradivari violins are holding up and are far older than the 100 years old the bursts will be in 50 years. Also - the price of these seems to have held (last I heard still commanded well over a million dollars) and surely more people play guitar than violins? I suppose the question is, will bursts achieve the same level of desire and respect as a Stradivari? Your point about the plastics and electronics might well be true though, as obviously the violins don't have these.
Violinist have there stradivari and we have our gibsons :thumb:

now i have two points i would like to make
1-if these violins are worth a million than surely and 59 burst can get there too
2-people who have these guitars will surely take care of them and in 50 years that cant be that far out of shape plus its makes us easier to get:thumb:
 

proudamerican

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all i know is that before we all kill ourselves i want a 54 custom
 

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