UV black light affect 2007 R8 with fading

judson

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if so how long?...i just need to tone the red down a tad....it will sit near a window for a few upcoming months but someone mentioned black light UV would do it quicker.....thoughts?
 

Subterfuge

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the UV spectrum is about as complicated as sterilizing surgical equipment with Gamma radiation ... a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing and a waste of good money .. different frequencies of the light spectrum affect different colors to different degrees ... I prefer good old free sunlight ... lights get complicated, and can be dangerous
 

Brek

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Yes, uv light is dangerous, I was careful to never look at the uva/b bulb when switched on that I used to fade mine. It faded the red nicely, but had very little effect on the brighter yellow, which is a shame as would like that slightly ambered. Might spray a coat of tinted over it.
 

judson

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Yes, uv light is dangerous, I was careful to never look at the uva/b bulb when switched on that I used to fade mine. It faded the red nicely, but had very little effect on the brighter yellow, which is a shame as would like that slightly ambered. Might spray a coat of tinted over it.
how long did you let it sit in front of the UV ?

i had some renovations done so almost all my guitars have been in cases in a closet for about 3 months as before the ones that get played sit out all day and get some sun most days....i was curious and if it accelerates it by a noticable amount, might not hurt to give it a shot....i am sure by the end of this summer, it will be fine sitting on a stand all day but i would like to know for future guitars....
 

cmjohnson

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Violin makers use UV cabinets with the "black light" type of UV bulb (as seen in certain topless bars...) to age their finishes in a matter of a couple of weeks. That type of light is considered eye safe. This is UV-A, which is closest to the visible portion of the spectrum. (Blue side, of course)

But tanning bulbs are a different matter. They WILL cause eye damage if seen with the naked eye, and the damage will start in less than a minute. They will also create a faster finish ageing effect. You might see a visible difference in just hours. Tanning bulbs are often UV-B emitters, which are NOT eye safe.

And then there's the medical grade UV sterilization lamps...that's UV-C and it's not safe to be exposed to it, period. Not your eyes, not your skin. (Unless at a substantial distance, of course.)
 

ARandall

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but had very little effect on the brighter yellow, which is a shame as would like that slightly ambered
Yellow would only ever fade (becomes an anaemic straw shade), not change colour......you do realise amber is essentially a version of orange - a mix of a yellow and a red colour.
 

judson

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this was an under the counter 18" light fixture that i bought a black light bulb for it to look for repairs in guitars i purchased....

like the ones that would light up old posters that would glow in all the head shops we would walk thru after smokin a bunch of weed as kids :420:

so i can let it fade by sitting out for the rest of its lifetime with me....have no plans to move it out :yesway:
 

Brek

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Yellow would only ever fade (becomes an anaemic straw shade), not change colour......you do realise amber is essentially a version of orange - a mix of a yellow and a red colour.
I hadn’t given it any thought as what colours it’s made up of. Would that not give me the result I would want then?
 

Oranjeaap

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I hadn’t given it any thought as what colours it’s made up of. Would that not give me the result I would want then?
To fully understand you need some knowledge of both chemistry and physics.

The easy explaination would be:
1) Most molecules have the property to change the properties of the light they reflect. We can see objects with our eyes because our eyes catch the light an object reflects. If the object reflects most of its light in a certain wavelenght, we see the item as being a certain color.
2) Some molecules do this more than others.
3) Some of the molecules we use(d) for painting stuff are not very stable, the energy carried by some types of light can alter the molecules structure. Sometimes the altered molecule does not have the same property of reflecting the light in the same wavelenght.

Aniline is red, it's used to make orange by adding lots of yellow. (UV)Light will alter the molecule, the altered molecule does no longer reflect red light. So we're left with only yellow.
The molecule we use for yellow does not break down like the red one. It will remain yellow.

The effect you're after is actually the clear nitro turning darker, giving the suggestion the yellow is turning more orange. There is a bunch of different reasons the nitro turns darker, UV light, cigarette smoke, dirt, grease, some other chemical reactions.
Your best bet would be to start smoking and stop cleaning your guitar. Give it 10 years and it will look like any old Gibson.
 

Brek

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Funny you mention smoking, I had had a crazy idea to get a couple of siglo’s and blow smoke over guitar a few weeks ago. Lol. But seriously, thanks for the info, it’s funny how we sometimes know stuff, but don’t recall it when a situation that requires it arises.

I learnt something of what you posted about, over the years through my interest in photography and 3D rendering and texturing. But didn’t think to recall or use that information in my quest to fade my guitar. Now you have jogged my memory, that knowledge I have might be able to get somewhere with it now.

The look of old lacquer for me is mesmerising, it carries a patina, sometimes subtle, sometimes not, that affects the way it reflects light, its complexly diffused. It has a warmth to it, that visuallyI find quite comforting to look at.
 

rockinlespaul

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I had some success fading a finish on a R8 before with a 1000 watt hid(high intensity discharge)grow light. I didn't do it long enough to really see what could be done but there was definitely some fading happening. Good luck!
 

cmjohnson

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Don't try to "age" a guitar by exposing it to cigarette smoke. It'll add an ugly dingy brownish-yellow cast to it, yes that is true, but it'll stink to high heaven. Who wants a guitar that looks like it's been in a million smoky bars...and smells like it, too?

Incidentally, regular classic Windex is the best remover of cigarette residue I've ever tried, short of ammonia. (Windex contains ammonia.)
 

Brek

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Cigarettes stink something awful, cigars much nicer. But i take your point, been so long since i smelt any tobacco i have no idea how i'd feel about it as a smell on a guitar. Might do a test with a piece of scrap wood. Purely in name of science though.
 

failsafe306

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Cigarettes stink something awful, cigars much nicer. But i take your point, been so long since i smelt any tobacco i have no idea how i'd feel about it as a smell on a guitar. Might do a test with a piece of scrap wood. Purely in name of science though.
I would love it if my guitars smelled like a high end cigar!
 

larryguitar

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Don't try to "age" a guitar by exposing it to cigarette smoke. It'll add an ugly dingy brownish-yellow cast to it, yes that is true, but it'll stink to high heaven. Who wants a guitar that looks like it's been in a million smoky bars...and smells like it, too?

Incidentally, regular classic Windex is the best remover of cigarette residue I've ever tried, short of ammonia. (Windex contains ammonia.)
Sadly, the 'new improved' Windex is ammonia-free, as are most of it's competitors. That's why it doesn't work for squat anymore.

Larry
 

CB91710

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Sadly, the 'new improved' Windex is ammonia-free, as are most of it's competitors. That's why it doesn't work for squat anymore.

Larry
Ammonia attacks window tinting films, which are prevalent both in cars and increasingly common in homes.
Windex used to advertise a "tint-safe" formula... likely completely dropped ammonia because of claims files against them.
Personally, I use Invisible Glass on my cars.

Dad used Fantastik to clean the tar off of Grandma's furniture and an old parlor guitar... but then he refinished the guitar with hardware store urethane.
I have no idea what happened to that guitar.
 

CB91710

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Cigarettes stink something awful, cigars much nicer. But i take your point, been so long since i smelt any tobacco i have no idea how i'd feel about it as a smell on a guitar. Might do a test with a piece of scrap wood. Purely in name of science though.
Cigars are much nicer while they are being smoked, but I can't tell the difference in the residue that remains in furniture, clothing, etc....
The aromatics dissipate pretty quickly and you're left with the same ash and combustion residue.
 


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