Using Different DAW's For One Track

MichaelAndrew3435

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Would it potentially cause an issue? Example, I record a guitar track in Logic and I send it over to my bass player. Bass player records his part in Pro Tools, singer records their part using their DAW, etc. We record our parts remotely using different equipment and one of my mates says this could cause issues with latency, but I'm not sure if it's due to using different DAW's or just one individual's settings. What do you guys think?
 

chef

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As the part you record lines up in time with the parts everyone else records, I don't see an issue.

I would settle on a file format that everyone's DAW supports, some of the formats logic supports maybe Mac centric.
 

Gfunk_Minor

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In my experience, as long as one person is responsible for combining the files, there should be no latency problems.
Just have everyone record their part and export just their tracks as a WAV file. Then you add their files to your master, and so on, and so on.
 

Freddy G

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I do this all the time. The most important things are to make sure the sample rate is the same and that all files start at the same time. Ideally, make the files all the same length (that way you can be doubly sure of proper alignment).....same start and end time......right down to the millisecond.
Most DAWs can import .wav, aiff or even MP3s.....but don't use Mp3s if you can avoid it.
 

mcphaul

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To elaborate on Freddy just to be clear.

1st, Consolidate all of the clips you may have on a track into one single piece of audio.

ie, if you record your part in one pass, great. If you have to punch in or if you record your part in pieces, it's best if you consolidate all of the pieces into one audio file. Edit and crossfade the various clips and punches before the consolidation or exportation.

2nd, Even if a part you are playing only happens in the out chorus consolidate or export from 0 or song start or where ever all of the other files start.

Nothing worse than importing files and finding that you now have to figure out where to place them.
 

Freddy G

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To elaborate on Freddy just to be clear.

1st, Consolidate all of the clips you may have on a track into one single piece of audio.

ie, if you record your part in one pass, great. If you have to punch in or if you record your part in pieces, it's best if you consolidate all of the pieces into one audio file. Edit and crossfade the various clips and punches before the consolidation or exportation.

2nd, Even if a part you are playing only happens in the out chorus consolidate or export from 0 or song start or where ever all of the other files start.

Nothing worse than importing files and finding that you now have to figure out where to place them.
Yes, thanks for clarifying Will.....that is all exactly what I meant.
 

Spudvader

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Why would there be latency issues? As long as each DAW supports the output files then there shouldn't be an issue. Each person could render as mp3 or AAC, cant see why you couldn't do post editing.
 

itsJJ

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In my limited experience doing "remote" recording with others in different states, if you're not all using the same DAW, its probably best to just send audio files, i.e., record and process your guitar track in Logic, then "bounce it" to an audio file, which you send to all your bandmates. Your bass player can then "import" your guitar audio file to his Protools DAW and record the bass part. Then he could bounce his processed bass part to an audio file and send it to your vocalist. Your vocalist can import both the guitar audio and bass audio files into his DAW of choice, align them, and then add the vocals, etc... There should be no latency issues doing it this way, AND none of the problems that can pop up when using different DAW plugins, processors, etc., because you've each bounced your parts to audio first. Make sure you all have the same project setup parameters for all your DAW project folders--time signatures/keys/tempo--BEFORE you start any recording, so that all future recipients can align the parts correctly. Ultimately at some point, however, all of the files/tracks will have to be put into one DAW Project Folder for final mixing/mastering. (Another note: unless you all are VERY GOOD at following a click track, its sometimes best to have the drums/percussion track(s) recorded first, and then you each add the other parts to it. Otherwise, if some of the timing is off, it can be difficult for your drummer/percussionist to "fit" his part into my "rush & drag" guitar playing!)
 

redking

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Between my drummer, bass player, mixing engineer and myself we are using 4 different DAW's. Here's how I do a song remotely as you are describing:
1. Create a an initial guide track using either the originally recorded track (if you are doing a cover) or for an original song, do a rough demo using a drum sample track and then play the basic guitar parts all the way through to the end of the song to form a skeleton.
2. Create a "count-in" (eg. 1, 2, 3, 4 for a 4/4 song) at the beginning of the song using the drum sampling program to cue each musician where to begin. If you have a rest somewhere in the body of the song, you may want to do another count-in to cue the musicians where the music starts again. [this may seem like a minor detail, but it's quite important and will save much frustration down the road)
3. Your final "guide track" will mix the count-in with the demo and export that to a wave file. (Make sure the drums are loud enough in the mix for the drummer to hear)
4. Send your final guide track to the drummer first and have him lay down his drums. Get the drummer to export the individual tracks and send them to you. Do a rough mix on the drums so they are audible and reasonably pleasant to listen to.
5. Send the rough drum mix to the bass player and mix in the guide track a bit lower in the mix, but you definitely want him to hear your drummer's tracks nice and loud so they can lock in as much as possible.
6. Get your bass player to export the bass track and send it to you and add it to the drum mix.
7. Record your guitar parts to a drum and bass mix - you may want to drop the guide track by now depending on how well you know the parts.
8. Do a rough mix and send that to the vocalist. Get him to export his vocal track only and send it back to you.
9. Do your mix
 

efstop

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no comprende, this above my pay grade
zdog
Dude, grammar and relevant comments might be beyond your pay grade. There, I said it.
Cheers!
I apologize for my beer filtered comment. Don't ever change, z.
 


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