Update on 3D "printed" guns

Publius pro tem

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Update on 3D "printed" guns and the associated legal wrangling from Forbes Magazine:



Andy Greenberg, Forbes Staff
Covering the worlds of data security, privacy and hacker culture.


This Is The World's First Entirely
3D-Printed Gun (Photos)



liberatorforbes1.jpg


The 3D-printed gun that Cody Wilson calls the "Liberator."

Eight months ago, Cody Wilson set out to create the world’s first entirely
3D-printable handgun.

Now he has.

Early next week, Wilson, a 25-year-old University of Texas law student and
founder of the non-profit group Defense Distributed, plans to release the 3D-
printable CAD files for a gun he calls “the Liberator,” pictured in its initial form
above. He’s agreed to let me document the process of the gun’s creation, so
long as I don’t publish details of its mechanics or its testing until it’s been
proven to work reliably and the file has been uploaded to Defense
Distributed’s online collection of printable gun blueprints at Defcad.org.

All sixteen pieces of the Liberator prototype were printed in ABS plastic with
a Dimension SST printer from 3D printing company Stratasys, with the
exception of a single nail that’s used as a firing pin. The gun is designed to
fire standard handgun rounds, using interchangeable barrels for different
calibers of ammunition.

Technically, Defense Distributed’s gun has one other non-printed component:
the group added a six ounce chunk of steel into the body to make it
detectable by metal detectors in order to comply with the Undetectable
Firearms Act. In March, the group also obtained a federal firearms license,
making it a legal gun manufacturer.

Of course, Defcad’s users may not adhere to so many rules. Once the file is
online, anyone will be able to download and print the gun in the privacy of
their garage, legally or not, with no serial number, background check, or
other regulatory hurdles. “You can print a lethal device,” Wilson told me last
summer. “It’s kind of scary, but that’s what we’re aiming to show.”

Since it was founded last August, Wilson’s group has sought to make as
many components of a gun as possible into printable blueprints and to host
those controversial files online, thwarting gun laws and blurring the lines
between the regulation of firearms and information censorship. So far those
pieces have included high capacity ammunition magazines for AR-15s and AK-
47s, as well as an AR lower receiver, the body of that semi-automatic rifle to
which off-the-shelf components like a stock and barrel can be attached.

Those early experiments have made Cody Wilson into one of the most
controversial figures in the 3D printing community. In October of last year,
Stratasys seized a printer it had rented to Defense Distributed after the
company learned how its machine was being used. New York congressman
Steve Israel has responded to Defense Distributed’s work by introducing a bill
that would renew the Undetectable Firearms Act with new provisions aimed
specifically at 3D printed components. In January, personal 3D printing firm
Makerbot removed all gun components from Thingiverse, its popular site for
hosting users’ printable designs.

All of that opposition has only made Wilson more eager to prove the
possibility of a 3D printed firearm. “Everyone talks about the 3D printing
revolution. Well, what did you think would happen when everyone has the
means of production?” Wilson asked when we spoke earlier in the week. “I’m
interested to see what the potential for this tool really is. Can it print a gun?”

It seems that it can.

Stay tuned for more. In the mean time, here’s another photo of Defense
Distributed’s prototype.


Screen-Shot-2013-05-02-at-8.02.06-PM.png


Update: Defense Distributed’s political opponents aren’t waiting around for its
printable gun to be finished and uploaded before calling for it to be banned.
Congressman Steve Israel issued a press release Friday responding to this story:
“Security checkpoints, background checks, and gun regulations will do little
good if criminals can print plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms
through metal detectors with no one the wiser,” his statement reads. “When
I started talking about the issue of plastic firearms months ago, I was told
the idea of a plastic gun is science-fiction. Now that this technology is
proven, we need to act now to extend the ban [on] plastic firearms.”


This Is The World's First Entirely 3D-Printed Gun (Photos) - Forbes



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MeKevin

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That's good info. Strange waters we're in.

I have no doubt that these guys will find a way to totally eradicate gun violence.

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOlB5BRSp5k[/ame]
 

Howard2k

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Wow, that's pretty incredible!

These printers are already getting close to that "affordable" range. Won't be long now. Steve Israel is fighting a losing battle on this one I suspect.
 

realjimjim

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I wonder what else he can build with his 3-D printer . .


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCeB2IcKKvw]07 - The Doors (Extra) - Build Me A Woman - YouTube[/ame]
 

sonar1

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Hooray. Technology now allows anybody without enough mechanical skills to build a crude zip gun (but enough money for a 3D printer), to circumvent law enforcement's attempts to keep crude zip guns off the streets.

Now you can simply "print off" a crude zip gun.





(the above is in purple, in case you haven't guessed)
 

Comanche

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People make real guns out of junk in dirt huts in third world countries. I believe Cody's ideas have more to do with less restriction than guns. I heard him talking about his ideas and he said it really has nothing to do with guns.
 

Stealthtastic

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So in the US when you buy a gun right now you dont need a license or background check right? What makes this different or even controversial in the US?
 

Comanche

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So in the US when you buy a gun right now you dont need a license or background check right? What makes this different or even controversial in the US?

Their is a mandatory federal background check when you buy gun from a licensed dealer. Person to person sales are not.
 

MeKevin

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So in the US when you buy a gun right now you dont need a license or background check right? What makes this different or even controversial in the US?

h71B7501C


I kid. I am stationed over here in Germany, and about a week ago I went with my NCOIC to pick up his car from the shop. The mechanic had to drive it out, it's a huge SUV. He was a pretty pissy fellow, and he had to negotiate some tight corners. He said "You Americans, why do you always have such big cars."

Without missing a beat, I said belligerently "that's so we can fit more guns in them"

He didn't laugh. My NCOIC did.
 

acstorfer

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Why do I have a feeling that background checks for 3-D printers will be brought up soon?
 

OldBenKenobi

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Gotta love 3D printing.

But wait, ABS plastic? Anyone out there printing pickup rings?
 

PraXis

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So in the US when you buy a gun right now you dont need a license or background check right? What makes this different or even controversial in the US?

If I'm in NJ and buy a gun from a dealer in TX, the TX dealer must ship the gun to a NJ FFL. The FFL runs my background check and I pick up the gun from this NJ dealer.

If I'm in NJ and want to buy a gun from a private citizen in PA, the PA citizen has to get a PA FFL (or dealer) to ship to my NJ FFL so they can run the background check and I pick up the gun from this NJ dealer.

If I'm in NJ and want to buy a gun from a private citizen in NJ, then it's a private transfer without a background check. We have firearms ID cards in NJ which means the state ran a background check on us already (plus we were fingerprinted and now in a database, but this fingerprinting is only if you want to buy handguns).

Other states do not have these IDs and private transfers (e.g. within PA) are just straight up face to face.

However as mentioned in this thread previously, all transactions through a dealer require the NICS (National Instant Check System).
 

Publius pro tem

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So is it going to melt when it fires?
I dunno. :dunno:

The article mentions installing a steel insert, but nothing about a barrel.

"... the group added a six ounce chunk of steel into the body to make it detectable
by metal detectors in order to comply with the Undetectable Firearms Act."


And six ounces is pretty damned heavy when many guns might weigh 10-12 ounces nowadays.

Glocks scared the hell outta people in the 1980s.
They were "plastic guns" and people would be boarding airplanes with them.
Circumventing metal detectors everywhere...

:wow:

Turns out they have a steel barrel contained within a metal upper slide operated by steel trigger mechanisms.

:rolleyes: :facepalm:

Even my aluminum guns have steel barrel inserts.


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