Uggghh...how to remove crazy glue off nitro finish?

Michael Matyas

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I have read in at least three different repair books that super glue melts into nitro and becomes part of the finish. This is not first hand experience, since I would not use lacquer for any reason. (If you want to know why, just google Chris Derrig, who died at about age 32.). I believe the only cosmetic repair possible is to sand the super glue down flush and polish it back up. Acetone is definitely out of the question, since it will melt the finish. Don't try scraping, since the glue has become part of the finish and you may lift chips off the guitar. You can either ignore it (and resolve to mask your finish off in the future next time you are using anything like cyano in the future), or take it to a luthier who will carefully sand the glue bumps down to finish level and polish it back up. Bear in mind that even in the hands of a pro this may leave a visible repair (either a spot that is shinier or duller than the rest of the finish).
 

Socrates

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Thanks for all the great feedback guys...much appreciated! Never going to let a tube of super glue get near my guitars again lol
 

lwchafin

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Glad you have not thought seriously about the acetone.

Look at this vid. You are not doing the fill part as you already have the glue proud of the surface. You are starting from the scraping with the razor bit:
Dan's th' man.
 

moreles

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As always, you need advice on the advice as some suggestions here, like acetone, are incorrect. Even water can be bad if you don't know what you're doing. A Randall has it right, IMO. If -- if --you can do the scraping and polishing carefully, that works. CA and lacquer work well together and can be blended invisibly. Or, you can sand through the finish, or cut instead of scrape, and make it worse. Judge your own patience and care and decide. I never use straplocks because they are, in my experience, overkill hardware that end up doing more harm than good, unless you're Mike Campbell swapping guitars with your roadie, fast onstage, for every song. I'm sorry you had an accident doing an unnecessary task. You may well be able to make the glue invisible.
 

Socrates

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As always, you need advice on the advice as some suggestions here, like acetone, are incorrect. Even water can be bad if you don't know what you're doing. A Randall has it right, IMO. If -- if --you can do the scraping and polishing carefully, that works. CA and lacquer work well together and can be blended invisibly. Or, you can sand through the finish, or cut instead of scrape, and make it worse. Judge your own patience and care and decide. I never use straplocks because they are, in my experience, overkill hardware that end up doing more harm than good, unless you're Mike Campbell swapping guitars with your roadie, fast onstage, for every song. I'm sorry you had an accident doing an unnecessary task. You may well be able to make the glue invisible.
I hear ya man. I watched the Stewmac video and it makes sense to fix it that way...but since I have zero experience with the techniques I am not sure I want to try it myself since the guitar is a new R0 I just got 3 days ago. Think I will do nothing right now except play and enjoy the guitar...then take a trip to Miami in the next few months and see if I can find a luthier (maybe at Walt Grace Vintage) to do the work. At least I never got any of the damn glue on the top or the back...just around the lower strap pin area
 
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Brek

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I did something similar, a single dot landed on lacquer, and formed a perfect tiny dome about 1/4 inch across, I was like shit shit shit, I dabbed most of it up, I could see it had kinda blended with the lacquer, I let dry, I then sanded flat with 600 grit wet and dry, then dropped one small drop of lacquer on it and after a couple of weeks with a few cutting compound sessions no evidence remains. I just realised as well typing this answer I didn’t feel I needed to ask what to do. I just used what info I picked up in last year and dealt with it.
 


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