Tuning Issues

bluesoul

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I have never had tuning issues with a Les Paul(I bend hard). Provided new strings are stretched...some nut sauce (vaseline or even chap stick) and all is good. I have never had to recut or file a nut with any Gibby. Maybe I have been lucky (I do wear Lucky Brand jeans BTW)! Unless there is some binding at the nut....lube and play!
 

silverjet89

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I have zero tuning issues with my LPs. I can normally go a whole set without tuning. Tips:
1. make sure the nut & bridge are cut correctly
2. Stretch the strings by pulling them hard away from the fingerboard as far as you can a few times after installing them. This actually helps more than almost anything.
3. Make sure guitar is generally set up properly.
4. Heaver gauge strings stay in tune better. Some string brands also stay in tune better so maybe try a different brand.
I have seen tuning keys wear out but that is usually fairly obvious when it happens.
 

IGRocker

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None whatsoever on mine. I used to have an issue with the D string, but after I broke the nut in a fall and replaced it with a bone nut, I haven’t had an issue. I assume it was due to a poorly cut factory nut, since it pinged occasionally.
 

gball

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I also have zero issues with tuning stability. They come out of the cases still tuned and stay that way while playing. I think if there are any tuning problems it comes down to the nut, as others have said.
 

Brazilnut

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It's almost always the nut, and that Corian is too soft! Even a Plek'd nut will give trouble if it's Corian. Roxie13 led me to a couple sites that show how to fix this problem, but you need nut files to do it.
 

Gibsonrocknroll

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When I change the strings on my guitar I put Big Bends Nut Sauce on the nut and on saddles of the bridge. No issues here.
 

ehb

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You can also take a string end segment from THAT position and run it back and forth in the slot at string change to make sure ain't no kank in there....You can also do that on a saddle slot to help make sure ain't no metal hair... Seen that before... Weird sounding B skrang I seem to remember...saddle string trough surface was not true.


Chapstick: emergency slot lube.
 

Relic61

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From the picture of your Squire It seems apparent that you are not using the self locking (string pinching) string winding technique!

1615579409912.png


A guitar wound like that will simply continue to slip & go flat with usage.

Here's a close up view of what that locking string technique (that locks the string tight by it's own force / pressure) looks like.

String Lock pinch wind technique.jpg


As you can see, the string goes through the hole & is then wound back around & under the string! Then, As the string is tightened, all the wind pressure pushes against the string & holds it firmly in place against the tuning peg & that makes it virtually impossible for the string to slip any further. Just properly stretch your strings after lacing up like this & enjoy song after song of potentially trouble free tuning! (as long as there aint something else stupid going on with the nut or bridge or trem/bridge sections of course)

Here's one quick vid using the pinch-wrap technique...
https://youtu.be/opmg6lK8FkY

Here's me trying to concentrate while stringing a PRS using the string lock trick.
PRS STRING WIND 2.JPG

PRS STRING WIND 4.JPG

PRS STRING WIND 6.JPG

I've been using this for 40 years now & it's been the one reliable trick that has saved me so much aggravation & frustration with guitars so.. short of having some kind of locking tuner, this technique is priceless & highly recommended.

Try winding a new set of strings on there using that 'pinch' technique, stretch those strings, play the $#it outta your guitar & get back to me in the morning.
 

PauloQS

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From the picture of your Squire It seems apparent that you are not using the self locking (string pinching) string winding technique!

View attachment 524810

A guitar wound like that will simply continue to slip & go flat with usage.

Here's a close up view of what that locking string technique (that locks the string tight by it's own force / pressure) looks like.

View attachment 524793

As you can see, the string goes through the hole & is then wound back around & under the string! Then, As the string is tightened, all the wind pressure pushes against the string & holds it firmly in place against the tuning peg & that makes it virtually impossible for the string to slip any further. Just properly stretch your strings after lacing up like this & enjoy song after song of potentially trouble free tuning! (as long as there aint something else stupid going on with the nut or bridge or trem/bridge sections of course)

Here's one quick vid using the pinch-wrap technique...
https://youtu.be/opmg6lK8FkY

Here's me trying to concentrate while stringing a PRS using the string lock trick.
View attachment 524807
View attachment 524802
View attachment 524799
I've been using this for 40 years now & it's been the one reliable trick that has saved me so much aggravation & frustration with guitars so.. short of having some kind of locking tuner, this technique is priceless & highly recommended.

Try winding a new set of strings on there using that 'pinch' technique, stretch those strings, play the $#it outta your guitar & get back to me in the morning.
I started using this technique because I thought it was the easiest to master. I like it a lot and it is by far my favorite. However, picture from the Squire have vintage Fender style tuners. You can’t use this locking technique with it.
 

Side Burns

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From the picture of your Squire It seems apparent that you are not using the self locking (string pinching) string winding technique!

View attachment 524810

A guitar wound like that will simply continue to slip & go flat with usage.

Here's a close up view of what that locking string technique (that locks the string tight by it's own force / pressure) looks like.

View attachment 524793

As you can see, the string goes through the hole & is then wound back around & under the string! Then, As the string is tightened, all the wind pressure pushes against the string & holds it firmly in place against the tuning peg & that makes it virtually impossible for the string to slip any further. Just properly stretch your strings after lacing up like this & enjoy song after song of potentially trouble free tuning! (as long as there aint something else stupid going on with the nut or bridge or trem/bridge sections of course)

Here's one quick vid using the pinch-wrap technique...
https://youtu.be/opmg6lK8FkY

Here's me trying to concentrate while stringing a PRS using the string lock trick.
View attachment 524807
View attachment 524802
View attachment 524799
I've been using this for 40 years now & it's been the one reliable trick that has saved me so much aggravation & frustration with guitars so.. short of having some kind of locking tuner, this technique is priceless & highly recommended.

Try winding a new set of strings on there using that 'pinch' technique, stretch those strings, play the $#it outta your guitar & get back to me in the morning.
Stringing it up this way is the only way imho

It holds tune incredibly!!!!!
just back wrap and pinch.

 

KelvinS1965

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From the picture of your Squire It seems apparent that you are not using the self locking (string pinching) string winding technique!

View attachment 524810

A guitar wound like that will simply continue to slip & go flat with usage.
If you look closely you will see that those are vintage slotted tuners: The end of the string goes down the centre of the tuner slot. All of my Fenders have those tuners and there is no slippage at all. In fact I just took my Strat out of it's case and had a play for the first time in a few weeks and it was still in tune!

You can see better from this angle:
Esquire 3.jpg


What you might also noticed from my earlier picture is that there are minimal wraps round the post, which also helps.

I don't actually do the string locking thing on my LP Junior as I never quite seem to have got the knack of doing it (my other Gibsons have locking tuners anyway). Properly stretched strings, nut slots filed and I'll put money on it still being in tune when I take it out of the case after a week or two as well.
 

AlbinB

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Neck relief? Properly set up nut? The angles of the D and G string are so severe, it is often a challenge for the string to return to proper tension.
 

Nintari

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Generally, tuning issues on a Les Paul are due to an incorrectly cut nut. You can try lubing the nut slots and that should help, do you hear any pinging when you're tuning those strings?
What does hearing that "pinging" noise usually indicate if you're hearing it while bending notes?
 


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