Truss rod channel with a router table.

Shandog

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Started another "other single cut" yesterday. Considering using a router table to cut the truss rod channel.

Anyone give this method a go here?

BTW. Happy Thanksgiving weekend to the other Canucks here. Gobble.
 

atj

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I don't use a router table but I made a box. The sides are at the right angle, then I place the neck blank in it and run the router over it on a plate that has fixed channels underneath that the sides go into so it cuts straight.
 

monsterwalley

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So are you just lifting the nut side about 1/8" with some scrap and running it through with a feather board? I have a 3/16th spiral bit that should work well with 3-4 passes.

I have a sled for both curved and straight truss rods and use a fly cutter.

The latest neck I used a regular router bit and stew macs da truss rod.

I am at work so can't get a better photo, but here is my first really crude set up and sorry for the crappy photo. I have better jigs and a genuine table I use now.
 

Shandog

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I have a sled for both curved and straight truss rods and use a fly cutter.

The latest neck I used a regular router bit and stew macs da truss rod.

I am at work so can't get a better photo, but here is my first really crude set up and sorry for the crappy photo. I have better jigs and a genuine table I use now.

Ah, I see. That's different but looks like a good way to do it. Where did you find a bit like those? I've never seen one like that?
 

emoney

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I use a router table most times for the truss rod. And yes, the scrap will give you the "curved"
channel. I use a 1/4" straight bit, raising it a smidgeon each pass until I get the channel
depth I'm after. Obviously, keeping the neck black square, so this is done "pre-profile", of course.
 

monsterwalley

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Here is a better shot of what I had been using.

If I remember correctly it was an eagle brand fly cutter. Again if I remember correctly, I think I ripped the idea off from Fletch along time ago.



For the curved truss rods, the curve is built into the jig base and the bearing follows it. The bearing follows the straight jig as well. Regarding depth at either end, it is determined by where you clamp it in the jig.
 

Skyjerk

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Started another "other single cut" yesterday. Considering using a router table to cut the truss rod channel.

Anyone give this method a go here?

BTW. Happy Thanksgiving weekend to the other Canucks here. Gobble.

I wish I had used the router table to do the channel on my first neck. It would have been WAY easier than trying to use a template and guide bushing, but sadly
I had not yet built it.

I did use router table (home made) to rout the two channels for carbon fiber rods in the second neck blank and they came out perfectly, and were far easier to do.

I wont do it any other way going forward.
 

ARandall

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I used the router table.....and will be using it again and again. Set up a fence clamped to the table at the right distance away......attach 2 small wedges to the nut end (double sided tape for mine) and rout away.

A sharp bit is great here too. I had a single sided bit that was getting blunt and it was always trying to drag the wood off the fence.
 

ScotttheScot

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Started another "other single cut" yesterday. Considering using a router table to cut the truss rod channel.

Anyone give this method a go here?

BTW. Happy Thanksgiving weekend to the other Canucks here. Gobble.
I used the router table.....and will be using it again and again. Set up a fence clamped to the table at the right distance away......attach 2 small wedges to the nut end (double sided tape for mine) and rout away.

A sharp bit is great here too. I had a single sided bit that was getting blunt and it was always trying to drag the wood off the fence.
I have a good solid fence built into my router table so I am going to use it . Thanks for your decisive reply!
 

dcomiskey

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I used to use my router table, but it was time-consuming. I found some guy who runs Maximum Guitar Works. He makes a truss and carbon rod jig that works AMAZINGLY well. It cut my work four-fold, easily: https://maximumguitarworks.com/products/truss-rod-template

Was worth every penny. I already had router bushings, so I was able to get right to work. All 3 channels done in about 20 mins or so. One of the best tools I've bought.

(No affiliation)
 

Skyjerk

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I used to use my router table, but it was time-consuming. I found some guy who runs Maximum Guitar Works. He makes a truss and carbon rod jig that works AMAZINGLY well. It cut my work four-fold, easily: https://maximumguitarworks.com/products/truss-rod-template

Was worth every penny. I already had router bushings, so I was able to get right to work. All 3 channels done in about 20 mins or so. One of the best tools I've bought.

(No affiliation)

<high-pitched, squeaky voice> What?!?! <high-pitched, squeaky voice>

I use my router table and its probably one of the fastest, most fool-proof operations of an entire build :)

Takes me 2 minutes to set up the fence, and another 3 to route the channel, and it’s perfect every time. Change the bit, move the fence a bit, and route both carbon fiber channels in another 5-10

Whats are you doing that’s time consuming?
 
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LtDave32

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Table saw.

Mark your center line.

Set your blade for 5/8 depth.

Stick a short 1/8 shim on each side of the line near the headstock end.

Set your fence so the blade cuts 1/16 to the inside of the line.

Run your piece.

Bump the fence so the blade is 1/16 to the far side of the cut you just msde.

Run your piece.

...done.
 

Robert Parker

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I typically do - just a standard slot for the DA rods. The last neck I built, I cut the channel with an old Stanley 45 combination plane. That was kinda fun.
 

dcomiskey

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<high-pitched, squeaky voice> What?!?! <high-pitched, squeaky voice>

I use my router table and its probably one of the fastest, most fool-proof operations of an entire build :)

Takes me 2 minutes to set up the fence, and another 3 to route the channel, and it’s perfect every time. Change the bit, move the fence a bit, and route both carbon fiber channels in another 5-10

Whats are you doing that’s time consuming?

What am I doing? Be me, I guess. :D I actually hate my router table and need to invest in a better one. But, that's further down the list of machines I, uh, need.

giphy_s.gif
 

Bainzy

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I typically do - just a standard slot for the DA rods. The last neck I built, I cut the channel with an old Stanley 45 combination plane. That was kinda fun.

The router table and fence method seems pretty decent but I'm interested in seeing how people do it with a combination / plough plane. There's a lot to be said for methods that are quiet and create shavings instead of fine hazardous dust, your neighbours and lungs tend to prefer them.
 

Skyjerk

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The router table and fence method seems pretty decent but I'm interested in seeing how people do it with a combination / plough plane. There's a lot to be said for methods that are quiet and create shavings instead of fine hazardous dust, your neighbours and lungs tend to prefer them.

Frankly Id be surprised to find anyone that would prefer to do it that way unless it was simply that those were the tools they had at their disposal.

There are a few folks that get something out of doing things "the old fashion way"
and there are a few "hand tool only" build threads on the forum that you might like. Try searching "hand tool" :)
 
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emoney

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Frankly Id be surprised to find anyone that would prefer to do it that way unless it was simply that those were the tools they had at their disposal.

There might be a few that get something out of doing things "the old fashion way"
Theres are few hand tool build threads on the forum that you might like :)
Kind of like using air conditioning.....we don't "have" to use it, but living in Florida you can get your you-know-what I'm using the heck out of it, lol.
 

Robert Parker

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The router table and fence method seems pretty decent but I'm interested in seeing how people do it with a combination / plough plane. There's a lot to be said for methods that are quiet and create shavings instead of fine hazardous dust, your neighbours and lungs tend to prefer them.
With a combination plane really only would work well with an angled headstock, because you need the full length of the cut to work. The way the plane works, the sole needs to ride out ahead of the cutting iron, and that isn't really feasible on a Fender-style neck.

That said, I rig up a platform where the headstock can hang down, but it still butts up against a stop-block, so I have something to push against. The treble side of the blank sits against a fence, and the bass side is open so the fence on the plane rides flush against it. I've got a cutting iron just the width of a DA truss rod, so I plane out the groove the full length from heel to headstock.

From there, once the groove is to depth, a gouge or core box bit opens up the truss rod adjustment area at the nut, and the overlay makes it look nice. A filler strip is glued in the heel to give the back end of the truss rod a solid footing.

I'll do a thread with pics in the next few days to illustrate.
 

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