Top Wrapping

medic24

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I started top wrapping my LP and my Sheraton over two years ago. In that short time I've lost my job, my dog died, the ol' lady ran off with a drummer and I contracted several STD's.

Just sayin'.
 

kakao

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I was watching some videos the other day and noticed that joe bonamassa was top wrapping his les pauls, and i also saw that jimmy page did it at royal albert hall in 1970. i was just restringing my les paul today and pondered top wrapping it, i decided against it because i read some forums and people were saying really contradictory things about it. some people were saying that it decreased sustain, some said it increased.some people said it made strings easier to bend, some said it made them harder to bend. before i top wrap my les paul id really like to get some more information about top wrapping




Its more to do with the aesthetics of the guitar than its performance.

You may try it once, but I doubt you'll do it again.


:dude:
 

fleahead

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Wow. Great bit of knowledge there.

While there's debate about tone/sustain, an actual benefit is that by lessoning the down angle of the strings over the saddles without having to raise the TP substantially you get slightly less tension making it easier to bend strings.
 

spitfire

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Wow. Great bit of knowledge there.

While there's debate about tone/sustain, an actual benefit is that by lessoning the down angle of the strings over the saddles without having to raise the TP substantially you get slightly less tension making it easier to bend strings.

The tension on the string has to be the same since the pitch the string is tuned to is a function of the string mass, length, and tension.
 

SGeoff

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:lol: opinions are like...
just try it for craps sake. like it or not.
get on with your life.
by the way, do you have a pickguard on that?:slap:
 

GitFiddle

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The tension on the string has to be the same since the pitch the string is tuned to is a function of the string mass, length, and tension.

I think the operative term here would be "friction" rather than tension.
There is less friction across the bridge saddle.
 

GitFiddle

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X–Ray;7498942 said:
This topic never gets tiresome....

I think the operative term here would be "always" rather than never.
This topic always gets tiresome.






:laugh2: :D
 

rossfr

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this is a never ending argument...same as the war tone cap PIO versus ceramic.

MHO for both : because it looks cool...
 

X–Ray

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this is a never ending argument...same as the war tone cap PIO versus ceramic.

MHO for both : because it looks cool...
TBH, I can't tell....

However, I do top wrap because I like the way it looks - yes, I'm that shallow
 

kakerlak

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The tension on the string has to be the same since the pitch the string is tuned to is a function of the string mass, length, and tension.

This is an interesting physics question, IMO. I wholeheartedly agree that the static tension on the string is always the same, regardless of anything going on behind the bridge/nut, as the frequency of the note is a product of that tension. In bending strings, though, it seems like you could get some travel across the bridge/nut and that the static tension of those lengths of string behind the nut/bridge could have some impact on the ease of bending notes. The steeper the angle/shorter the string length behind the bridge/nut, the higher the tension of those segments of string when the actual playing length of string is tuned to the same pitch/tension. So, if you're stretching those segments along with the actual playing length of string, the more tension they're under, the less "give" would come from them in a bend. Pluck a note behind the bridge and then bend that string across the fretboard -- it'll rise in pitch, proving that some of the bending energy goes to pulling the whole string.

The counter to this might be that it would seem the string would need bent mechanically farther across the fretboard to achieve the same rise in pitch the more it pulls across the bridge in so doing. If the string was locked down at the saddle and nut, you'd purely be stretching the playing length of string, however, if you pull additional length of string across the bridge in bending, that would tend to lower the tension of the playing length, countering the action of the bend and requiring it be bent physically farther and perhaps ultimately to the same tension. I think my conclusion here is that top wrapping, all else unchanged will make the strings slinkier and easier to bend to the same physical point, but, since bending to the same note requires raising the overall tension of the string, they just have to be bent physically farther and, in the end, the same physical pressure has to be applied.

I am not a physicist.
 

GitFiddle

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Sumbeetch

jackie-gleason.jpg



fric·tion
ˈfrikSH(ə)n/
noun
noun: friction

the resistance that one surface or object encounters when moving over another.
"a lubrication system that reduces friction"
synonyms: abrasion, rubbing, chafing, grating, rasping, scraping; More
resistance, drag
"a lubrication system that reduces friction"
the action of one surface or object rubbing against another.
"the friction of braking"
conflict or animosity caused by a clash of wills, temperaments, or opinions.
"a considerable amount of friction between father and son"
synonyms: discord, strife, conflict, disagreement, dissension, dissent, infighting, opposition, contention, dispute, disputation, arguing, argument, quarreling, bickering, squabbling, wrangling, fighting, feuding, rivalry; More
hostility, animosity, antipathy, enmity, antagonism, resentment, acrimony, bitterness, bad feeling, ill feeling, ill will, bad blood
"there was considerable friction between father and son"
antonyms: harmony

Origin
mid 16th century (denoting chafing or rubbing of the body or limbs, formerly much used in medical treatment): via French from Latin frictio(n-), from fricare ‘to rub.’
Translate friction to
Use over time for: friction
 

61LPSG

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Sumbeetch

jackie-gleason.jpg



fric·tion
ˈfrikSH(ə)n/
noun
noun: friction

the resistance that one surface or object encounters when moving over another.
"a lubrication system that reduces friction"
synonyms: abrasion, rubbing, chafing, grating, rasping, scraping; More
resistance, drag
"a lubrication system that reduces friction"
the action of one surface or object rubbing against another.
"the friction of braking"
conflict or animosity caused by a clash of wills, temperaments, or opinions.
"a considerable amount of friction between father and son"
synonyms: discord, strife, conflict, disagreement, dissension, dissent, infighting, opposition, contention, dispute, disputation, arguing, argument, quarreling, bickering, squabbling, wrangling, fighting, feuding, rivalry; More
hostility, animosity, antipathy, enmity, antagonism, resentment, acrimony, bitterness, bad feeling, ill feeling, ill will, bad blood
"there was considerable friction between father and son"
antonyms: harmony

Origin
mid 16th century (denoting chafing or rubbing of the body or limbs, formerly much used in medical treatment): via French from Latin frictio(n-), from fricare ‘to rub.’
Translate friction to
Use over time for: friction


Friction is what occurs every time someone visits this topic.:naughty:
 

phins74

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I top wrapped my 13 Traditional a couple of days ago. I like the change. Can I say tone heaven....not really, new strings, fresh setup makes everything better. top wrapping was a little icing....I did notice got the tailpiece lowered out of the way for easier play....Can't wait to do the SG when its ready for strings....Hell why wait, may do it tonight....:slash:
 

kakerlak

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...I did notice got the tailpiece lowered out of the way for easier play....Can't wait to do the SG when its ready for strings....Hell why wait, may do it tonight....:slash:

I'll definitely be stringing my wife's new '00 SG that way whenever I get it put back together, but only b/c it has such a steep neck angle. The bridge is way off the body and the tailpiece was too. There's no way it'll clear the back of the bridge if I lower it down to a "normal" height and, even if it did, that sharp a break angle would probably bend the ABR-1's studs right over (had to straighten one anyway).

My wife's '82 SG has a much shallower neck angle and sets up perfect with the bridge just a hair off the top of the guitar, the tailpiece all the way down and the strings just shy of hitting the bridge (strung through, rather than over the bridge).

In honesty, I prefer the look of thru-strung tailpieces, but I like the top-wrap look better than the look of a stopbar sitting 1/2" off the face of the guitar.
 

moreles

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Both approaches are good depending on... you. I think the only "absolute" to consider is break angles at the bridge. Some people top wrap in order to keep the stoptail snugged to the body while avoiding having the string rest on the back of the bridge before hitting the saddles. This is only necessary with some LPs, and depends on other factors (neck angle, bridge height.) and assumes that you want to keep the stopbar down tight for max coupling. Otherwise, you have two good choices and need to decide for yourself!
 

Wrench66

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The argument is pointless IMO. It's easy to do. Try it. If you like it, keep it that way. If not, put it back. It's just that simple. It cost one pack of strings. Everyone here can afford a pack of strings.

I did it on my Les Paul and my SG just to keep the strings off the back of the bridge, but it does feel different. Maybe you'll like it. Maybe you won't. Maybe you won't notice a difference. You won't know until you try it.

It's all subjective and personal opinion. Do what feels good for you.
 

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