Tips for buying things on Web Auctions (no names!)

ptate

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Originally Posted by ptate
Well,

1. Check feedback carefully and look at the items sold/bought. Anyone with hidden feedback avoid!

Yes care should be taken but don't forget Ebay is set up for the buyer more so the seller. Negative feedback can and has been given too easy by buyers who try to try it on with the sellers after they have bought an item. I agree though wih the hidden feedback, don't get that one.

Yes care should be taken but don't forget Ebay is set up for the buyer more so the seller. Negative feedback can and has been given too easy by buyers who try to try it on with the sellers after they have bought an item. I agree though wih the hidden feedback, don't get that one.

Can't work this one out. Location should have nothing to do with getting your money back, Ebay and Paypal are set up for any eventuality (yeah right). Are you saying if it goes "tit's up" you should become some kind of vigilante and visit the seller at home?

Credit crunch!!!!! Shit happens and sometimes you have to sell "the best" guitar.

Emailing is fine but like mad is a pain in the arse. I've had a lot of time wasted by the most inane of questions. I'm always polite but can sniff out a bullshitter.

Why the hell would I want a local pick up, I'm selling it on Ebay an auction site not in my local Craigslist/freeads/loot. This opens up a lot of problems for the seller such as time wasters, and hagglers. Don't forget if they turn up don't like it and don't want to pay you can't leave them negative.....but they can to you.

Some good points for the buyer but don't forget the seller needs to be aware as well.

Spent a lot of time trying to "fix" some of the suggestions that aren't really broke man :hmm:......?!

In answer:

Location: If they are in the same country litigation is straight forward, as is legal support from your friendly police person(?).

Sale: Clarification of their reason to sell. If they are legit, they will tell you openly, why it has to go (stolen is not a valid answer!).

E-mail: See response 1. In litigation, paperwork and fact count; supposition and "I thought it was.....", do not. Once you are committed on paper, it makes things a lot harder to dispute and forms one aspect of the contract you are entering in to (the offer/acceptance interface, if you need to know!).

Local pick-up: Not an issue I can see, if you really want to sell the item.

As an aside, work out the value of the item you are buying and see if there are "new" deals to be found on the internet that better the price. I have seen many amps/guitars go for a great deal more than you can buy them new...!?!

Peace.

:dude::slash::dude:
 

jhun1976

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I totally agree with checking the feedbacks since that is the number one thing I check before even considering bidding but flooding the buyer with e-mails can be pretty annoying. I rather suggest that ask all your questions in a single e-mail and send it. Don't blame someone for getting annoyed if what you are doing is annoying. Also, ask only questions that are not in the ad.

Guitars bought from private sellers are not covered with warranty since you need a receipt from a Gibson dealer to file a claim.

Well,

I've bought a few things, both international and national, and have managed to work out a few safety tips. If anyone else has any, maybe this is the place to posts them?

Here's mine:

1. Check feedback carefully and look at the itIems sold/bought. Anyone with hidden feedback avoid!

2. Check the location and determine whether there are any issues with you getting your money back if it all goes "tits-up". China is a long way away....!

3. Check the item description is full, complete and factual (no bullsh*t!, i.e. " it's the best guitar I own"- why are they selling it then?).

4. Don't rush into it. There are plenty more (generally!). E-mail the seller like mad. I do it all the time. If they lose their temper with me asking questions, why would I want to buy from them and what have they to hide?

5. Ask if you can pick it up. If it's a fraud, they'll try to make some excuse (see my other thread). I've avoided many scams with this ruse. Give it a try, you meet some cool folks as well.

6. Don't let bidding fever get you. We've all seen examples of crap making large amounts of cash because a couple of bidders got carried away. Don't let it be you.

7. NEVER EVER overide your gut feeling. If it feels wrong, don't bother.

These are just a few of my tips....Any more.

:) :)
 

slapshot

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5. Ask if you can pick it up. If it's a fraud, they'll try to make some excuse (see my other thread). I've avoided many scams with this ruse. Give it a try, you meet some cool folks as well.
That's not true there are plenty of people (like me) with nothing to hide but just don't want strangers in my home.had a knife pulled on me over a guit 4 years ago so no more.I just politely decline even offer to give them free shipping sometimes.

MLP,

one of my favourite tips is to ask for a photo with a tag with my name placed on th strings above the pickups. Any legitimate seller will provide without any second thoughts if you are a legitimate buyer.It does not mean that you still wont have problems but it does eliminate a scammer who does not have the product as advertised.

Barry
I put my name in all my auction pictures already.A tag in picture not a wtaermark.Any idiot can do that.

Another thing I never buy from someone who only has stock photos of something.get off your ass and take a picture if you don't have a camera get off ebay than!
 

Mookakian

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Beware of the engrlish

For exampull, a question i asked today:




Dear keke.sen258,

HI, can you tell me if this is a genuine shure mic? Does it have the numbers 1, 2 and 3 on the bottom where you plug the cord in.

Regards, Tim Mason

the reply

Dear mookakian,


Please be assured that order, our true Shure SM57 microphone, thanks for your letter, you said that our microphone has a sign, thank you

:lol: :shock:

Poss. a decent sale, though very unlikely
 
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UITA makes a lot of valid points respective of the selling side on eBay. The current state of eBay is geared towards the buyer to the point it has become a caveat vendor marketplace where the seller assumes all the risks. Three years ago when this thread began, it was a different eBay. Not saying the current state of eBay is better than before, just different.

The best advice I can impart on anyone buying on eBay is to educate yourself on what your buying as knowledge is power.

The OP stated that a good paper trail (emails) is a good way to defend yourself in court. WTF? If you feel the need to prepare a case to buy, then maybe you shouldn't buy sight unseen.

Reputation is king in both the Brick & Mortar world as it is in the Internet world. Feedback is a good, but the real tell tale is what buyers say in their left feedback.
 

DrakeZero

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If they don't answer questions, they are not to be trusted.
That's one of my major rules whenever I buy from someone on ebay. I always send a question even if it's a basic one like, "How much for shipping to etc." If they don't reply I don't bother.

The other part about suspicious answers is true as well. I bidded for a 69 Fender Mustang competition and the seller was constantly changing the shipping costs on me then changing his answers. For example I asked "Are you the original owner?" and he said yes. I then asked him about the damages on the guitar and he said he didn't know where they came from. They were on the guitar when he bought it. After I asked him again he admitted he wasn't the original owner and bought the guitar from Guitar Center.

Coupled with a lot of suspicious bidding from 0 feedback users I pulled out. Glad I did, I had a feeling the guitar was a fake.
 

brinjen

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I agree with the photos argument... though I can understand sellers who blurr out part of the serial number to discourage fake ebayers from using the photos... but should be able to email the complete photos if asked.

I've had good experiences with Ebay overall... most recent purchase was a mahogany tele style body from the US. Seller was upfront on the shipping costs (and yes... I do realise freight in general is expensive nowadays). Got a very nice guitar body that was definitely the one in the photos (and the seller had plenty of close up high resolution pics) and gave the seller a top rating and review for their efforts. Currently waiting for the satin finish to dry... now I just gotta get a nice mahogany neck to go with it and I'll be one very happy player! :applause:
 

shivabyt

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Hi all...

1.The buyer should know, by all means, the seller's contact details before sending the payment. This is one way of protecting one's money.
2. The buyer should take extra precautions on most of the international item listings because this is where most fraudulent activities happen.

Good Luck..!

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WillowtheWitch

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be wary of sellers that say

1) selling for a friend
2) they know nothing about guitars


both of these 'denial of knowledge' positions allow sellers to not mention warped necks, broken truss rod tips, repaired headstocks, complete rewires etc.

Yes sometimes they really are just selling for a friend, or know nothing, but you really have to be careful and get detailed pics if this is the case
I'm not sure that a complete rewire is a bad thing as long as they list it as such... It might even make it more desirable to some if it's a non vintage piece... I love ENG pickups but they do require a total rewire :dude:
 

Big John

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1. set-up a bank account for just PayPal transactions

When funds hit your designated PayPal bank account, you can transfer the funds to your real account, and then PayPal can't touch it because the only account they have on file and have access to is the one that you just transferred the money out of. This is called "My Own Damn Seller Protection".

2. designate immediate payment and 3-5 days of shipping prep in the auction

This allows time for the funds to hit your bank account before you ship. Quickly transfer the money to your other account like stated above.

3. set-up your eBay account for shipping to U.S. addresses only

Eliminating other countries from bidding may or may not lower your final price, but it will sure as hell lower any transaction, shipping, and communcation problems.

4. never post full serial numbers on auctions

Posting full serial numbers gives the potential for false police reports on the buyer's end which does nothing but get you screwed.

5. pack the hell out of the item

If for some reason the item doesn't get delivered, then it's coming back to you. Making the package bomb-proof ensures that it will come home in good shape so you can re-sell it. The last amp I shipped had 4 inches solid of bubble-wrap, and then it was double-boxed.

6. insure the hell out of the item

If the item gets damaged during shipping and you didn't take out of enough insurance to fix or replace the item, you're an idiot, plain and simple.

7. only ship to the confirmed address PayPal has on file for the buyer

If you ship to any other address other than a PayPal confirmed address, you're setting yourself up for a claim. On the other hand if the buyer refuses to accept the package at his designated PayPal confirmed address, and you followed rule #1, you've already got his money...he'll wake up and smell the coffee.

8. only use FedEx

FedEx is the only shipping entity in the U.S., period, that currently provides online viewing of the buyer's signature when they sign for the package. If the buyer starts a claim stating that it wasn't delivered and you used FedEx, you simply provide the link to where PayPal can see the signature online, and the claim will be dead within minutes....and in your favor.
 

Actinic

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8. only use FedEx

FedEx is the only shipping entity in the U.S., period, that currently provides online viewing of the buyer's signature when they sign for the package. If the buyer starts a claim stating that it wasn't delivered and you used FedEx, you simply provide the link to where PayPal can see the signature online, and the claim will be dead within minutes....and in your favor.
This is nonsense. First, Fedex sucks. They damaged a $3000 product model that was shipped to me in an ABS transit case. The internals were surrounded by 3" of foam. Just do a search for damaged guitars shipped by Fedex, on this site or others. USPS Express Mail is a lot more careful, and you can get a signed receipt mailed to you for under $3. This is acceptable to ebay in case of a dispute. In fact, the standards of proof for ebay are very low, and even delivery confirmation is used as proof of receipt in claims cases. The reason for getting a signed receipt is to be able to file an insurance claim for lost goods.

The number of sellers who know how to pack a guitar is pitifully low. Since this is my peak buying season, I have received dozens of high value items. Only one was packed properly, in a large box with Taylor inserts, and sufficient padding and markings on the box. How much time does it take to put the words, "This End Up", on a guitar box? Yet most sellers forget to do this.

There is no such thing as rep via ebay. Each new transaction you undertake is a gamble irrespective of a seller's feedback. There was an MIJ guitar sold on ebay with a sizeable gash on the neck. The seller is a member of this forum. I call this guy a crook because he intentionally posted a de-focused photo on a hosting site to mask this pre-existing damage. In general, I trust no one, unless I have personally done business with them before. Only 20% of all sellers are informed, ethical, and very diligent in following up on a sale (including packing and shipping in a timely manner). With the other 80%, I pray whenever I send them money. Currently, the biggest ripoff going is postage. A seller states that he is shipping by UPS ground, but uses USPS 4th class mail instead. The savings? 50%. The downside? Huge waiting time.
 

Lowdown

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BTW,still waiting for your reply,Clark.

Business must've been good this year,huh :hmm:



:laugh2:
 

slapshot

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not really
i did finally get my caps though i;ll wire up over the weekend
 

old mark

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Paypal can help you if you do run into a problem with an item. I bought a used guitar with a factory case from a company online...I got the guitar, not the case.
I emailed the customer service guy who told me he had the case and was shipping it out the next day. They went out of business with NO warning to their own employees at the end of business that night...I got no case, and no one to contact.

I got on to Paypal and told them I wanted 1/2 of my money back. I got it inside of a few weeks, and bought another case with it. They have recovered money for me from bad sellers several times, where eBay did nothing.

mark
 

BillB1960

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Paypal can help you if you do run into a problem with an item. I bought a used guitar with a factory case from a company online...I got the guitar, not the case.
I emailed the customer service guy who told me he had the case and was shipping it out the next day. They went out of business with NO warning to their own employees at the end of business that night...I got no case, and no one to contact.

I got on to Paypal and told them I wanted 1/2 of my money back. I got it inside of a few weeks, and bought another case with it. They have recovered money for me from bad sellers several times, where eBay did nothing.

mark
Paypal IS Ebay.
 

old mark

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Paypal is owned by eBay. Paypal WILL work with a buyer or seller to try to get a bad deal straightened out. eBay will tell you "too bad".
i sold oneBay for years and gave up in disgust. Paypal has been very helpful to me in several bad situations.

mark
 

heyjimmy

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hiii,
welcome to this site,i think u shoul ask to your friends or elders they can give you the right answers...

..........................

Alladsclassified
 

jhun1976

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If you buy someone in eBay and the seller offers to deliver personally, make sure you check everything because you'll lose your buyer protection this way. Ebay says that you have time to inspect the item before the seller leaves and after then that is it. I learned this one the hard way.
 




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