Tiny "scratch"? on the fretboard binding of my Les Paul

Stinky Kitty

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after a month of playing it the fretboard started collecting dust and the bridge too... i play everyday for about an hour or too usually...
You've got more than dust, you've got some dead skin and other gnarly gradeaux growing all up in there..

The secret sauce is to turn every nick, scratch, and dent into a loving memory
 
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moreles

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Looks like playwear. I have no love of battle scars and other damage (though some to think such hacks look good, and fine for them) but wear is inevitable. And as for dust, etc., well, there's dust in your hourse and it's getting on your guitar. So dust the guitar. Sadly, most inhabited areas of the country have some degree of pollution, dust, etc. in the air, and yes, there's probably mre UV getting through the atmosphere, too, so you can expect buildup that's not really very nice stuff. Cleaner and polish are not good materials, either. You can do a good cleanup with a microfiber cloth and some Q-Tips. I don't like crud, either.
 

CB91710

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Ok i got the point, But dings like this usually happens in new les paul guitars because of the nitro finish? also when i picked it from the store it had zero rust/dust on it but after a month of playing it the fretboard started collecting dust and the bridge too... i play everyday for about an hour or too usually...
Part of the dust/grime issue is because you leave it on the stand.
Put it in the case and it will remain cleaner.
Wash your hands before playing, wipe down the neck after playing. Our skin oils are acidic and will "age" metal parts.
That oil attracts dust from the environment... and if you live in the SouthWest, EVERYTHING gets covered with a fine layer of dust.
 

LPTDMSV

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I do believe that that is exactly what binding is for! That's one dandy battle scar. Stand proud, man.
Exactly :) binding is a sacrificial layer to protect the important wood behind it!
 

TrackerDan

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So after i played today i took a look at my guitar and i noticed that the fretboard has some new "crack" on it, it's not really noticeable but once you see it it kinda sucks, Should i worry about it? or is it just a "cosmetical" mark? The guitar always sits on the stand in my room and i'm trying to be really careful and i dont know where this crap came from...

Also whats the best way to clean the rust/dust that collects on the guitar bridge/saddle and body parts through time?

Your guitar has no problem, keep playing it. If you have a better luthier in your area you could set an appointment with them to see if there are any recommendations or further revelations. Stop obsessing. That looks like something you could have done yourself setting the guitar down, a little gusto on a sharp corner?
 

danzego

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Yeah, that’s just the nitro wearing or it may have been like that from the beginning and you never noticed it before now. I have two small spots like that on my 50s Standard and it was like that from the get go.
 

Rock & Roll Hawk

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Its just part of the guitars history, so just think of a great story to tell them when someone does notice it.
You could say 2 great looking chicks got on the stage fighting on who would get to go home with you.
You see I'm already jealous about your guitar.
 
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coreydm676

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Just bought a new Les Paul Special with super thin satin finish. I can't wait till it starts to age.
 

gball

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I had a little bit flake off like that on one of my SG's a couple of weeks after getting it. I dabbed it with a clear nitro pen (from Stew Mac) and that fixed it right up.
 

Kaicho8888

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If it bothers you, easy fix is a dab of super glue, let dry, sand (600 grit) flat on a small flat wood, then polish with a non silicon polishing compound.

Use a nice soft 4" horse hair paint brush to dust the guitar... easy less than 5 seconds. Besides it's good putting that old paint brush to use; instead of being stored in the garage for decades!

Quick tips so you can get back to practice! :applause:
 

silverface

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"it's a tool with moving parts. it's going to get dinged up."

^^^^^ This

If you bouight the guitar in 2018...or later...to be a pretty piece of sculpture to put on display, buy a glass front case, hang it on the wall, buff it with Stewmac Preservation or a clay compound (that leave no silicones or wax to discolor later) and admire it daily

I've been finishing guitars since the 1970's; I was also in the tech end of the coatings business from 1975-2011, and some nitro, acrylic or blended lacquers stay in near-mint condition - except for discoloration from aging; others get small dings in months; others get thrashed in days...or hours.

And the SAME thing happens to polyesters, polyurethanes and proprietary finishes like Rickenbacker's.

IT ALL DEPENDS ON HOW THE INSTRUMENT IS HANDLED, STORED, AND PROTECTED FROM TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY CHANGES.

All typical guitar coatings have inherent issues with the expansion and contraction of wood - and binding moves with the wood. In order to handle that movement there has to be a sacrifice in abrasion resistance. You can't get EVERYTHING - no coating will stay in perfect condition under all conditions.

So you MUST expect scratches, chips, dings, yellowing, fading, wear in different amounts depending on:

... the specific coatings (not "type", like "nitro" - a term thrown around for "lacquer" to the point of becoming meaningless - but the SPECIFIC stuff in THOSE containers used to coat your guitar) - there are anywhere from 3 to 6 or 7 different materials used in coating a guitar - plus solvents; the QUALITY and COMPATIBILITY of each of those materials; the quality of the preparation; the application equipment quality and how well it's maintained; the skill of the applicator(s) (or programmer of the robotic system) and inspector(s); the SPECIFIC type AND cut(s) of wood used to make YOUR guitar (i.e. there is a big difference between ash heartwood and ash sapwood, and you will not know which type...or one in between...you got); moisture content of the wood...

...and the variables set by the instrument manufacturer in the complete coatings specifications (i.e. the tolerance range for EVERY component that goes into every material; application tolerances for every material (thickness ranges, dry time periods - caveat: traditional lacquers DO NOT CURE, they dry ONLY by evaporation of the volatile components).

My points - no coatings system is perfect; every one is a compromise; and every one will suffer some scratches and wear marks if it is played. IT IS NOT ARTWORK - IT IS A MUSICAL TOOL THAT *MIGHT* BE ATTRACTIVE.

If you want to keep it looking nice, handle it carefully and keep all oils, silicones and waxes off it (except fretboard oils on raw wood).

Dust just happens. Some places have more than others. I own 3 parrots and have to dust at LEAST once a day! DO NOT use furniture-type dusting compounds - they'll eventually damage the finish, and some ATTRACT dust (and ALL oils are dust magnets); and NEVER use ammoniated cleaners like windexd, which corrode aluminum and some plating.

I use a clean, dry, soft cotton cloth and "Swiffer" type feather dusters with NO sprays!

Hope that helps. Now go PLAY your tool!
 

Scream And Fly

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Seriously man, I wouldn’t even give it a second thought. We love Gibsons for their character. If you want perfect, then spend $300 on an Ibanez. If you want factory “mojo”, Gibson is the choice.

Okay being serious, I wouldn’t let that bother you in the slightest. It’s not an issue at all. I have yet to see absolutely flawless binding work on any new Gibson made in the last 20 years, so myself, I’d consider what you’re seeing there normal and not worry.
 


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