Thoughts on this fretboard?

LtDave32

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Well, maybe not the answer to m inquiry. Victor's strips are two of them at the other end, and it doesn't make sense they would leave the tape on in the gluing process for an RFID chip.
 

mudface

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Well, maybe not the answer to m inquiry. Victor's strips are two of them at the other end, and it doesn't make sense they would leave the tape on in the gluing process for an RFID chip.
Yeah...they have been doing that chip since they started the Historics at the Custom Shop in 1993..... I don't know if they do this on the regular production line....i don't see why not.
 

LtDave32

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Well, maybe not the answer to m inquiry. Victor's strips are two of them at the other end, and it doesn't make sense they would leave the tape on in the gluing process for an RFID chip.
Quoting myself here..

But they do leave the tape on, according to what the man said. It shows a guy carefully putting on the tape with the RFID chip up near the nut end. -one strip. And then it shows the FB being glued to the neck. Hmm..

This fret board that I have, it had no strip up there. Rather two strips near the big end on each side.

The mystery continues..
 

BRMarshall

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Looks like the fretboard on a very inexpensive Epi LP I bought a few years ago as a project/leave out guitar. I sanded it 400 to 1500. I expected to work on a $150 guitar, but not a $3,000 one. The fretboard should be much, much smoother. I have a Gibson LP Studio and Traditional with nice, smooth boards.

Best of luck on getting this resolved.
 

Brazilnut

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This scaly fret board mystifies me, actually.

It's supposed to be Indian rosewood, yes?

I've done so many IRW boards, I can't count how many.

None of them were scaly, even in raw form.

I radius them with 120, sand them smooth with 220, then hit them with steel wool.

View attachment 533304

It's not rocket science.

Now, Gibson may use a jig to power-cut a radius in the board, but a couple of minutes with some sandpaper..

I just don't get how that scaling is possible.
I am loving that board!!!! That's a very nice piece of rosewood!
 

Telechamp

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Man, that's a pretty rough board... If it were mine - back she goes!
 

LtDave32

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I am loving that board!!!! That's a very nice piece of rosewood!
Thank you!

that's just everyday Indian Rosewood. That 'purple-ish" stuff.

No big secret, just time and care. First the 120 grit and the block , run a squiggly line down the center of the FB with a quilting pencil (silver, so it shows up) and sand 30 strokes from one end, 30 from the other (to keep the body English from making an "eyebrow" curve) and repeat, then when the line is all but gone, switch to 220 grit. That's fine enough. no need to go to finer grits. It will have a sheen to it after that and a steel wool rubdown.
 

moreles

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As for the OP, that's a horrendous fretboard and should be returned and wherever you bought it should discount the replacement for your bother and loss of use. That fretboard is absurd, and it takes a hell of a nerve to sell it as acceptable, when it's clearly junk. We can diagnose why it happened, but who cares? They passed it along and foisted it on you. That's super disrespectful. And no, you can't smooth it yourself in any really good, proper way with the frets in place. And why should you even try? I'm sorry you got this -- very disappointing!
\]
 

LesPaul60sTribute

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It looks to me like your board was cut at the end of a maintenance cycle on the machine it was cut from. Perhaps blades getting dull, too much debris in the machine while cutting, or blade speed was too slow at time of cut. Or the piece itself was somehow moved through too fast. I would be willing to bet that there are a few boards just like yours that came out of the same poor run.
 

Wudchuk

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My Studio's rosewood fretboard looks quite similar. At first I was discouraged by looking at nice and clean fingerboards, but I have come to terms with how it looks and accept it as normal wear-and-tear on my guitar from playing/cleaning. I'm not sure if it really affects the tonal qualities or playability of the guitar; I feel like the sound has definitely changed but not necessarily from the quality of my fretboard. I'll post a picture of mine if anyone wants, it looks pretty bad to me... but then again I don't mind it!
 

PAPADON

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Is it just me or should I bring this back to where it came from?
My $1800 Studio is like that as well. Even more irritating is that my $250 Agile board is superb. Return it. It's either poor workmanship, substandard rosewood or more likely both. You could order another one but I've seen this so often that my guess is you'll run the risk of ending up in the same place. Damn you Gibson.
 

rocknrollmouse

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You've paid a premium price for a sub-standard product. If it were me I'd return it! By keeping you are telling the manufacturer and the resellers this poor quality is acceptable.
Personally I wouldn't accept it on a $300 guitar never mind a $3000 one.
If Glarry can get their fretboards smooth at their price point, I think it's reasonable to expect Gibson to at theirs?
 
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Gibson got into trouble a few years back for using illegal wood. So who knows about their fretboards now-a days, but if it was me I would oil the fret board down before I did anything else. That could very well be your problem.
The first thing I did to an used 4k 2016 Gibson Custom Shop Les Paul was to oil the fretboard.
Unfortunately it doesn't matter how much the guitar cost all fretboards will dry out.
Try that and let us know if that fixed the problem.
 
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amgomez

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I’ve had this on a les Paul, it’s raised grain. Like someone else said (too lazy to go search ) it’s most like due to too much moisture from water or oil, or it could be that it wasn’t sanded well. It’s a pretty simple fix. If you love the guitar otherwise, keep it. I would use 1500-2000 grit sandpaper. Sand vertically, and do not dig in, you’ll mess up the radius. Which would be hard to do with 2000, but I would be careful. Clean it with naphtha, or just a dry rag if you don’t have any. Very, VERY lightly condition it, and you should be good!
 

The Dutchman

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OK, promised I would get back to you so here’s an update:

I went back to the store with the intention to return it and get a refund or a replacement. However, I’ve tried 2 other exact same models and some other Les Pauls and although some were OK, it realised none sounded or felt like the one I had...call me crazy but I’ve decided to keep it. I guess I’ve fallen in love with it. Good sustain, very resonant, good weight, love the top, stays in tune well, etc.

I was absolutely not impressed with the other guitars I’ve played there. So unimpressed that I decided to take the guitar back home instead of returning it. I realised I got so hung up on the fretboard thing I ignored it’s actually a very good guitar. Ofcourse this fretboard is far from ideal but I’ll just play the hell out of it and enjoy the way it sounds, and plays because I must admit it doesn’t affect playability, it’s merely a cosmetic flaw.

In case it still bugs me let’s say a year from now I’ll bring it to a professional to get it sorted if needed.


edit: slight plot twist. Decided to return the guitar regardless. Couldn’t live with it...next time I won’t be ordering online, I’ve found out the supply from Gibson is too inconsistent. The fact I have a slight OCD doesn’t help either...
 
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