Thoughts on the Peavey T-15

Shreddergirl

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
7
Lately, I have been seeing the boys on Beale street going gonzo for these old school Peavey guitars. The prices have really jumped. I remember when these beasts were very cheap at pawnshops.... but now have become pricer low enders... Are they worth the hype? What's the most you would pay for this brand of axe?
 

Attachments

Last edited:

brokentoeswalker

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2012
Messages
3,752
Reaction score
6,358
I have one, the pups really have their own sound. It's a short scale as well so it's not the an anchor like the t60 series. They call them the Mississippi Mustang. Mine is stock. It goes out of tune fast if you play it hard. She prefers a light touch. built like a tank though.

$200 with the case is about right.
 

smk506

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2009
Messages
4,902
Reaction score
8,909
I’ve always heard great things about the funky peaveys, playability and tone that people seem to really like.

I don’t really like the aesthetics, so never really went for one.

I like their US made strats, can still find them for around $200 most of the time.
 

Michael Matyas

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
399
Reaction score
379
I have one of those monstrosities. It was a yard sale special and came with a case and a no-name booster pedal and a 60-watt Crate amp. The strings are so close together at the nut that it's virtually unplayable. I blew up the amp at a jam session. The only way I play the guitar is sitting down on my lap using a spark plug socket for a slide. I believe I paid $125 for the whole kit and kaboodle. I certainly wouldn't pay more than that for one of those guitars.

Just because something is old doesn't mean it's not a piece of crap. When I see people on eBay bidding $1000 for 1970's bolt-on Les Paul knockoffs, I've got to laugh. I had two of those guitars in my teens, and they were alright for garage-band stuff, but they aren't for serious musicians.
 

smk506

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2009
Messages
4,902
Reaction score
8,909
I have one of those monstrosities. It was a yard sale special and came with a case and a no-name booster pedal and a 60-watt Crate amp. The strings are so close together at the nut that it's virtually unplayable. I blew up the amp at a jam session. The only way I play the guitar is sitting down on my lap using a spark plug socket for a slide. I believe I paid $125 for the whole kit and kaboodle. I certainly wouldn't pay more than that for one of those guitars.

Just because something is old doesn't mean it's not a piece of crap. When I see people on eBay bidding $1000 for 1970's bolt-on Les Paul knockoffs, I've got to laugh. I had two of those guitars in my teens, and they were alright for garage-band stuff, but they aren't for serious musicians.
Especially true with vintage MIJ stuff. Not all that glitters is gold.

I had a Madira, import Guild line, looked like a sweet les Paul special with two dog ear p90s. Cool looking guitar from the pics on the used guitar center page.

Once it arrived I found it had a neck made from a rubber tree, what appeared to be a paper thin fret board, dodgy electronics and a just an overall inescapable feeling of cheap junk. One could go play 3 or so bolt neck epiphone specials and easily find 2 of them to be much, much better guitars.

It DID have a pretty great sounding bridge pickup, but that wasn’t enough to justify the price tag.
 

hbucker

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2007
Messages
3,862
Reaction score
1,526
Lately, I have been seeing the boys on Beale street going gonzo for these old school Peavey guitars. The prices have really jumped. I remember when these beasts were very cheap at pawnshops.... but now have become pricer low enders... Are they worth the hype? What's the most you would pay for this brand of axe?

I hear two questions: Is the "T" series of PVs any good/worth paying extra for? Are PV guitars any good?

T-series: This is actually a decent line of guitars from PV. I believe the T-15 was the entry level/practice model. It was the first guitar line to be produced on CNC machines, so the consistency from guitar to guitar is really good. From a workmanship perspective, they really are quite good compared to other guitars made at the time. Now everything is done on CNC, so consistency is more expected.

I'm not sure about the specific features on the T-15, but the T-60 had very unique wiring that allowed you to slowly split the coils by turning a knob - getting a gradual transition from humbucker to singles.

Now, as was mentioned earlier, they tend to be heavy and I've never really cared for the look. I also don't really care for the feel of the neck. Not because there is something wrong with it. But I think it's very generic feeling. (Kind of how the guitar looks to me too.) Pickups aren't bad, but they don't seem particularly special to me either. But they don't suck. They just have their own voice.

For people who love these guitars, they are very versatile, play well and they can't say enough nice things about them. The people who don't like them cite the above and what others have said on this thread. The 15 may have lower end components than the 60 just because it was intended for a different kind of player.

I'd play it before you buy it. That will tell you how much you like the feel of it. I would also recommend comparing it to other guitars in that price range. Which do you like better? Is the uniqueness of the PV worth paying extra for? Even if you aren't as in love with the feel of it? - You're the only one who can answer this.

Historically, PV guitars have been massively undervalued on the used market. So I might suggest that the jump in prices is the market coming around to the understanding that these guitars really are pretty good. "Oh, it's just a PV," seems like it's been the attitude of the average uninformed buyer, which means the people who know what they are looking for can get a really decent guitar, often for half of what it's really worth.

Are PV guitars any good? It seems like PVs reputation was built on affordable quality and on the perception that they build low-end beginner guitars. I think there is a lot of truth to both of these points, but neither is the complete story. And what's wrong with affordable quality in any context?

At almost any price point, their USA made guitars have always been surprisingly good. I've got a '92 USA Predator that is an excellent Strat copy and a great platform for modifications. Again, it isn't my favorite neck, but that's a personal preference, not a quality statement. It was toward the lower end of Strat copies they made at the time, but is still a decent guitar. As you moved up in their product lines, they only got better. - But it said PV on the headstock so the perception was that it wasn't as good as Fender.

Around the time EVH got involved with PV, they really started to turn out some quality guitars. Not just the Wolfgang, but the Cropper Classic and several other guitars worth people's consideration - yet they never really took the market by storm.

While PV has often copied a look from existing designs, they intentionally didn't feel like the designs they were copying. You wouldn't mistake a PV for a Fender just because of the feel and/or because they wired them uniquely or they designed their own pickups. I think this throws people for a loop who just want a Tele - not some sort of reinvented Tele... Fair enough. That still isn't a comment on quality.

Their foreign, beginner guitars were pretty typical of that kind of product. Just a beginner guitar. But the USA stuff was and is worth a look. You may not like what you're playing, but IMO, it isn't because of the quality. It will more likely be due to how it feels or sounds not being your cup of tea.

It's fair to point to Carvin guitars the same way. They get bashed on resale value, which implies the aren't good quality. No, they are good quality. They're just their own animal.

Hope this helps.
 

MSB

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2015
Messages
5,291
Reaction score
6,808
heavy and skinny necks, it was worth a try, but quickly found a new home.
 

Shreddergirl

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
7
I hear two questions: Is the "T" series of PVs any good/worth paying extra for? Are PV guitars any good?

T-series: This is actually a decent line of guitars from PV. I believe the T-15 was the entry level/practice model. It was the first guitar line to be produced on CNC machines, so the consistency from guitar to guitar is really good. From a workmanship perspective, they really are quite good compared to other guitars made at the time. Now everything is done on CNC, so consistency is more expected.

I'm not sure about the specific features on the T-15, but the T-60 had very unique wiring that allowed you to slowly split the coils by turning a knob - getting a gradual transition from humbucker to singles.

Now, as was mentioned earlier, they tend to be heavy and I've never really cared for the look. I also don't really care for the feel of the neck. Not because there is something wrong with it. But I think it's very generic feeling. (Kind of how the guitar looks to me too.) Pickups aren't bad, but they don't seem particularly special to me either. But they don't suck. They just have their own voice.

For people who love these guitars, they are very versatile, play well and they can't say enough nice things about them. The people who don't like them cite the above and what others have said on this thread. The 15 may have lower end components than the 60 just because it was intended for a different kind of player.

I'd play it before you buy it. That will tell you how much you like the feel of it. I would also recommend comparing it to other guitars in that price range. Which do you like better? Is the uniqueness of the PV worth paying extra for? Even if you aren't as in love with the feel of it? - You're the only one who can answer this.

Historically, PV guitars have been massively undervalued on the used market. So I might suggest that the jump in prices is the market coming around to the understanding that these guitars really are pretty good. "Oh, it's just a PV," seems like it's been the attitude of the average uninformed buyer, which means the people who know what they are looking for can get a really decent guitar, often for half of what it's really worth.

Are PV guitars any good? It seems like PVs reputation was built on affordable quality and on the perception that they build low-end beginner guitars. I think there is a lot of truth to both of these points, but neither is the complete story. And what's wrong with affordable quality in any context?

At almost any price point, their USA made guitars have always been surprisingly good. I've got a '92 USA Predator that is an excellent Strat copy and a great platform for modifications. Again, it isn't my favorite neck, but that's a personal preference, not a quality statement. It was toward the lower end of Strat copies they made at the time, but is still a decent guitar. As you moved up in their product lines, they only got better. - But it said PV on the headstock so the perception was that it wasn't as good as Fender.

Around the time EVH got involved with PV, they really started to turn out some quality guitars. Not just the Wolfgang, but the Cropper Classic and several other guitars worth people's consideration - yet they never really took the market by storm.

While PV has often copied a look from existing designs, they intentionally didn't feel like the designs they were copying. You wouldn't mistake a PV for a Fender just because of the feel and/or because they wired them uniquely or they designed their own pickups. I think this throws people for a loop who just want a Tele - not some sort of reinvented Tele... Fair enough. That still isn't a comment on quality.

Their foreign, beginner guitars were pretty typical of that kind of product. Just a beginner guitar. But the USA stuff was and is worth a look. You may not like what you're playing, but IMO, it isn't because of the quality. It will more likely be due to how it feels or sounds not being your cup of tea.

It's fair to point to Carvin guitars the same way. They get bashed on resale value, which implies the aren't good quality. No, they are good quality. They're just their own animal.

Hope this helps.
Wow thank you! i have a very nice peavey raptor that i like a lot... in Memphis peavey's are still popular... When i was cruising through ebay i just could believe the prices on the T series guitars... I have never played one a T-15 or a T-60 but i will like to try one for fun...
 

Attachments

BadPenguin

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2015
Messages
1,294
Reaction score
1,210
I've owned, T-15's. T-25's, T-60's T-40 (bass), and 3 different Patriots (One was alder, one mahogany, and one ash) Operative word being "Owned".
 

LeslieFan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2018
Messages
123
Reaction score
197
T model basses are nice. The T 60 is quite decent imo. But the T 15 and T 30 (the Strat version) were made for young beginners. Pups were great but as mentioned, the scale and neck profile were deal breakers for me. The T 30 I had for a while held tune well with 12's on it, but that skinny neck was still there.
 

Brian Krashpad

Senior Member
Joined
May 12, 2008
Messages
917
Reaction score
853
My t15 is 6 1/4 pounds so not exactly a boat anchor. The t60s were heavier.
Also, not all of the T-60s are heavy. Only the natural (Northern Ash) ones, although those are pretty ubiquitous.

I have owned 4 USA Peaveys. One was a '90s Predator Strat. It was similar to a MIM Fender Standard Strat of the same time period, SSS, maple board, ceramic pickups. Not anything special but serviceable enough. Sold it to a bandmate.



I've also owned two T-series and one USA Peavey that came just after the T-series, which was basically almost the same guitar, just rebadged. The latter was a bass called a Fury (a name which Peavey reused for other basses later), which had earlier been the T-20, with very slight modifications.

Looked like this:



A very nice little (not heavy) bass. I got into a band with a new bassist who had never played before and needed an instrument. Sold it to her for what little I paid for it, but would buy it back in a heartbeat.

The two USA Peaveys I still have are the two "flagship" T models, the T-60 guitar and T-40 bass. They have the graduated coil-splitter circuit that a lot of people don't even realize is there, since it's actuated with a "tone" control. Up to about 7, the pickups are humbuckers and the control works like a regular tone control; after that the second coil is gradually removed. Actually very useful.

The natural finish Northern Ash guitars and basses are heavy. My natural T-40 bass is the heaviest instrument I own. However, many of the solid-color guitars are not Northern Ash, but poplar, and they are much lighter. My black T-60 is poplar and is not heavy at all. Whether heavy or not, if you understand the splitter circuit these are very useful and versatile guitars, that are very well built, to the point of being virtually indestructible.



 

Lesterdelphia

Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2016
Messages
62
Reaction score
34
The USA made Peavey Odyssey, Cropper Models, and JD Omniac were all very well made, great playing, well priced instruments. One of the bigger guitar purchase mistakes I ever made was not grabbing a used, but mint Odyssey w/ a killer solid carved AAA highly quilted top in amber that was going for under $500.00 w/ original HSC . Looked great, played great, and sounded like a nice Les Paul. The Odyssey's were basically a Tele shaped body w/ a carved maple top, set in heel less 24.75" scale neck w/ humbuckers (which I think were split-able).
 

Roxy13

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2017
Messages
10,034
Reaction score
26,583
I have one of the basses. I've owned it for around 20 years.
 


Latest Threads



Top