Those cheap Epiphone tuners

Guitar Rod

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c4rdgqkbtriedeyrikh4_a946366d-cc82-4d75-b57b-b51819c31e2e_400x.jpg

I have an old Korean LPJ that has those cheap guitar tuners like above. They are okay, but a bit loosey goosey, fast, and it's a razors edge to get them tuned just right. Feel like they'd unravel even though they don't. My Yamaha acoustic has the same tuners and they are perfect. Would taking the cover off and tightening the spindle gear screw help? Or is there an aftermarket or newer version of them that would work better? Don't want to drill holes for new Klusons or anything like.
 

Guitar Rod

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If you're not comfortable drilling and assuming it's within your budget, you can always try those hipshot tuners with the universal mounting plates.
Very comfortable drilling and installing new tuners. Have done it before. Just want to keep this guitar reversibly stock. Thanks for the tip!
 

John_P

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Those tuners came stock on my mini Squire.

The guitar was unplayable in every way, a good project in other words.

Once I fixed all issues the guitar plays great and it stays in tune. No need to replace the tuners.
 

DrBGood

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c4rdgqkbtriedeyrikh4_a946366d-cc82-4d75-b57b-b51819c31e2e_400x.jpg

I have an old Korean LPJ that has those cheap guitar tuners like above. They are okay, but a bit loosey goosey, fast, and it's a razors edge to get them tuned just right. Feel like they'd unravel even though they don't. My Yamaha acoustic has the same tuners and they are perfect. Would taking the cover off and tightening the spindle gear screw help? Or is there an aftermarket or newer version of them that would work better? Don't want to drill holes for new Klusons or anything like.
I thank you for wanting to fix instead of throwing away and buying new. So few people think that way nowadays and that's what will kill us.

First, if there's a screw in the button, try to tighten it. Often that's all what's needed. If that doesn't help and you can gently pry the tabs to open the gearbox without breaking them, take a look inside if anything can be tighten. I did open some once, but I can't remember if there's anything to be done.

Good luck
 

LSAR

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Epi has used at least two versions of these. For many years there were ones where the button and shaft were a single piece. Popping the casing off those and tightening the screw internally and ensuring it was properly lubricated sometimes helped them, but generally they were a lost cause. Newer Epi's tend to have a version with a button that screws onto the shaft entering the tuner mechanism itself, and I've had good luck with them. I don't consider them a quality set of tuning machines by any means, but they do work and hold tune, unlike the old ones. This is based on my experience, and as with most things Epiphone, your mileage may well vary.

For reference, I have a recent model Epi SG Special worn behind me that a friend loaned me for a bit to do some setup work on it and so I could check it out. I'd probably recommend swapping the tuners if the intent was to play out with it, but otherwise they're just fine (these being the newer ones with screw on buttons) after a decent setup and tightening on the guitar overall.

OP, you've probably got the older ones. I know Ping makes a version of these...whether it's the new style or not I don't know. But, if you're commited to finding something that swaps in without irreversible modification then I'd look on eBay and other such sites for some similar tuners and you may be able to find some that are manufactured to a tighter tolerance than the stock ones and thus are more functional. I can't see a world where that's worth bothering with though over just getting a set of decent and reputable tuners, for my own thinking anyway.
 

Guitar Rod

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Epi has used at least two versions of these. For many years there were ones where the button and shaft were a single piece. Popping the casing off those and tightening the screw internally and ensuring it was properly lubricated sometimes helped them, but generally they were a lost cause. Newer Epi's tend to have a version with a button that screws onto the shaft entering the tuner mechanism itself, and I've had good luck with them. I don't consider them a quality set of tuning machines by any means, but they do work and hold tune, unlike the old ones. This is based on my experience, and as with most things Epiphone, your mileage may well vary.
Mine are the older ones that don't have the button screw. Figured the new ones would be an improvement. Like I said, the ones on my Yamaha acoustic work fine. And the Amazon reviews for the newer style are pretty good for cheap tuners. Saw some of the same style but with oval button tuners reminiscent of the old Junior button tuners, so I got the digital calipers out and checked if they will work. Looks like they should, so I ordered them and a Wilkinson wraparound tune-o-matic bridge.

61cgkLljVnL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
 

Jim85IROC

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Epi has used at least two versions of these. For many years there were ones where the button and shaft were a single piece. Popping the casing off those and tightening the screw internally and ensuring it was properly lubricated sometimes helped them, but generally they were a lost cause. Newer Epi's tend to have a version with a button that screws onto the shaft entering the tuner mechanism itself, and I've had good luck with them. I don't consider them a quality set of tuning machines by any means, but they do work and hold tune, unlike the old ones. This is based on my experience, and as with most things Epiphone, your mileage may well vary.

For reference, I have a recent model Epi SG Special worn behind me that a friend loaned me for a bit to do some setup work on it and so I could check it out. I'd probably recommend swapping the tuners if the intent was to play out with it, but otherwise they're just fine (these being the newer ones with screw on buttons) after a decent setup and tightening on the guitar overall.

OP, you've probably got the older ones. I know Ping makes a version of these...whether it's the new style or not I don't know. But, if you're commited to finding something that swaps in without irreversible modification then I'd look on eBay and other such sites for some similar tuners and you may be able to find some that are manufactured to a tighter tolerance than the stock ones and thus are more functional. I can't see a world where that's worth bothering with though over just getting a set of decent and reputable tuners, for my own thinking anyway.
the Special P90 that I had for a while had the newer style, and to your point, they sure weren't anything special, but they did their job and held tune. I should have kept that guitar, it was a great one.
 

BadPenguin

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There's no real reason to keep it stock, if it doesn't hold tune. They are the cheapest tuners they could get. Just get new tuners, and save yourself, and others, from tuning issues.
 

Jim85IROC

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So far, in all the guitars that I've bought and sold, I've yet to find a tuner that was the cause of tuning problems, aside from those that were obviously broken or damaged. If you want higher quality tuners for the look, for the feel, or for a different ratio that makes them easier to tune, that's all 100% valid, but if you're doing it to fix a tuning stability issue, chances are, you'll have it with new tuners too.
 

DrBGood

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So far, in all the guitars that I've bought and sold, I've yet to find a tuner that was the cause of tuning problems, aside from those that were obviously broken or damaged. If you want higher quality tuners for the look, for the feel, or for a different ratio that makes them easier to tune, that's all 100% valid, but if you're doing it to fix a tuning stability issue, chances are, you'll have it with new tuners too.
200% agree with that.
 

BRMarshall

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There seem to be aftermarket tuners with the same type of covers. I keep guitar parts around and have a set of Pings with the same looking covers still in the package so can’t speak to that Ping model specifically. However, I put a set of similarly priced Ping open gear tuners on a student’s guitar several years ago and surprised how smooth they were. They were about $25/set then, almost double that now. I’ve had terrible open gear tuners and great ones. Terrible Grover-style tuners and real Grover’s. I hope you can find a set of similar style but better quality - good luck.
 

Jay4321

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Those tuners are common and the same found on some older Yamaha acoustics as well, both one I have and a neighbors 12-string. I replaced a few of his with some I found online for like $12 and were identical.
 

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