This would make most good musicians cry

MikeyTheCat

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Some of what was going on recording what I think is one of the greatest songs ever written.



You couldn’t phone it in, you couldn’t punch it in, you could only deliver your part and if you didn’t you blew the take. Not only did you have to be an excellent musician but you had to handle stress.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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it's why I don't enjoy the modern, 'quantize the drums and cut/copy/paste' the song together recording techniques of today.

in the old days you sat down with an instrument and actually wrote a song, and you had to be able to play the song. You didn't assemble it in a computer like a text document.
 

efstop

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it's why I don't enjoy the modern, 'quantize the drums and cut/copy/paste' the song together recording techniques of today.

in the old days you sat down with an instrument and actually wrote a song, and you had to be able to play the song. You didn't assemble it in a computer like a text document.
In the old days of the late '60s and early '70s, songs were assembled on multi-track tape ;) But the instruments were played and not digitized.

"Loose" or random quantizing can be done to analog sounds.
 

Tim Fezziwig

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We STILL record live to tape-as a trio-need to "capture" drums?Capture WHOLE band! I'm THE BEST run tape-first take-easy as FEZZ. First Old FEZZ was recorded this way in 1993- engineer handed me a Strat- I never played a Strat before?No worries- 1 take. If you can't "perform under pressure " do not leave your room=LIFE IS PRESSURE!
The proof-listen to that Strat beg!
 
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Tim Fezziwig

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Beach Boys are a RARE band that could pull it off AND sound great. VERY COMPLEX MELODIES! R+R band should be able to play their song in" AT MOST "5 takes-otherwise you failed- it is Teenage Sex music it should have warts and blisters.
 

VictorB

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I don't have a problem with overdubs but you used to lay down the base track as a group in one pass.
This is the way I’ve always done it. Even when things became digital.

Basic tracks: 2 guitars, bass, keys, and drums all recorded live, vocals overdubbed, some guitar overdubbed.

We used to bang out basic tracks for 12 songs in one day.
 

HardCore Troubadour

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I still do it that way....when we make the first pass, I am shooting for drums, but the more bass that also gets laid down that does not need further attention, the better....most times we get about 90% of it also.

Guitars make a pass, but we very rarely keep it.

For the sake of the room size/bleed etc. etc. we come back and cut all guitars separately.
 

BenjaminW

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The Behind the Sounds video for Wouldn't It Be Nice is so damn beautiful.

I need to listen to all of Pet Sounds at some point.
 

Uncle Vinnie

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Saw that. So many great players, mostly big jazz names. Fun to sing to the backing track.
 

Bill Hicklin

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In the old days of the late '60s and early '70s, songs were assembled on multi-track tape ;) But the instruments were played and not digitized.

"Loose" or random quantizing can be done to analog sounds.
Playing an overdub to a recorded track may be harder than playing it live.
 

Bill Hicklin

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The Beatles would play a song dozens of times to get a base track they liked then add overdubs
And, at least in the later period, Paul would lay down a guide bass track as a foundation for everything, then come back and replace it with a more elaborate bass line. (Sometimes George would do the guide bass on a Fender VI, especially if Paul was on piano).
 
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MikeyTheCat

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it's why I don't enjoy the modern, 'quantize the drums and cut/copy/paste' the song together recording techniques of today.

in the old days you sat down with an instrument and actually wrote a song, and you had to be able to play the song. You didn't assemble it in a computer like a text document.
Also the gift of those guys and gals in that room that can somehow understand how to get what was in Brian's head onto their instruments. And that's not even mentioning how a large room full of musicians somehow didn't sound like a garbage truck dumping it's contents on a tin roof.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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I got to see Brian Wilson play all of Pet Sounds in concert a couple years back.



Some really great musicians. If you had asked me in 1990 if I'd see Brain Wilson in concert playing Pet Sounds all the way through.... I'd think you're high.
if you'd told me even 5 years ago I'd own that record I'd think you were nuts.

But I read a Beatles interview where (Paul?) said it's an incredible record, so into the cart it went.
 

Tim Fezziwig

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Playing an overdub to a recorded track may be harder than playing it live.
B, amen. I had to dub a MAJOR flop in a song---"-OK , Tim this is VERY tricky- one chance to "punch in."" I actually had to put down my joint! I did it --he was shocked? Never doubt me.
 

six-string

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I got to see Brian Wilson play all of Pet Sounds in concert a couple years back.



Some really great musicians. If you had asked me in 1990 if I'd see Brain Wilson in concert playing Pet Sounds all the way through.... I'd think you're high.
Yeah I saw that Pet Sounds tour too. It was great.
 

MikeyTheCat

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if you'd told me even 5 years ago I'd own that record I'd think you were nuts.

But I read a Beatles interview where (Paul?) said it's an incredible record, so into the cart it went.
You have to love an era where the top groups were all "oh shit, they did what?"-ing over their peers' music.

The Byrds were inspired by The Beatles and folk:
But when he turned sideways, I went, ‘Oh that’s a 12-string!’ I was playing a Gibson acoustic 12 with a pickup in it, but it didn’t have the kind of sound George was getting. I liked his sound better, so I went out and got a Rickenbacker 360 12-string.”

While McGuinn and his bandmates had the same gear as the Beatles, they used it to produce a distinctly different sound and overall aesthetic. What McGuinn brought to electric 12-string rock guitar was a solid grounding in folk picking - something that Harrison and other Rick-playing Brits, such as Pete Townshend, didn’t have.


The Beatles were inspired Bob Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited and The Byrds to produce Rubber Soul:

Their relationship with the Beatles was a particularly close one. George Harrison was quick to acknowledge McGuinn’s influence on his own playing, publicly admitting that his Beatles composition If I Needed Someone had been inspired by McGuinn’s guitar work on the Byrds’ recording of The Bells of Rhymney.

Brian Wilson was inspired by Rubber Soul to produce Pet Sounds:

Rubber Soul blew my mind,” Wilson remembered to Paste in 2004. “I liked the way it all went together, the way it was all one thing. It was a challenge to me to do something similar. That made me want to make Pet Sounds, I didn’t want to do the same kind of music, but on the same level. Smile. wasn’t the same kind of thing; it wasn’t anything like The Beatles. It wasn’t pop music; it was something more advanced,” he proudly stated.

Pet Sounds inspired Sgt Pepper.

We know about that one.

George had befriended Dylan and the two would work together helping each other with songs and Harrison would drag Dylan back onstage for the Concert for Bangladesh.

It was a freaking vortex of creativity.


 

LP121

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it's why I don't enjoy the modern, 'quantize the drums and cut/copy/paste' the song together recording techniques of today.

in the old days you sat down with an instrument and actually wrote a song, and you had to be able to play the song. You didn't assemble it in a computer like a text document.
It seems like almost everything is snapped to the grid over drum samples.

Homogeneous and boring. Slight inconsistency is what gives music life.
 

Tim Fezziwig

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Mrs. FEZZ and I listened to it last month-Mrs. FEZZ" These are the most lovely vocals-better than Simon and Garfunkel"
Yes. I have it on 180 gram vinyl-<also have Beach Boys Christmas>through my old Dynaco ST 70-WOW- I sold the Dynaco 5 years ago-next year= new turntable and tube pre-amp. I was a shepherd- this is a great cover-goats are lovely.
1603753656949.png
 

Bill Hicklin

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You have to love an era where the top groups were all "oh shit, they did what?"-ing over their peers' music.

The Byrds were inspired by The Beatles and folk:
But when he turned sideways, I went, ‘Oh that’s a 12-string!’ I was playing a Gibson acoustic 12 with a pickup in it, but it didn’t have the kind of sound George was getting. I liked his sound better, so I went out and got a Rickenbacker 360 12-string.”

While McGuinn and his bandmates had the same gear as the Beatles, they used it to produce a distinctly different sound and overall aesthetic. What McGuinn brought to electric 12-string rock guitar was a solid grounding in folk picking - something that Harrison and other Rick-playing Brits, such as Pete Townshend, didn’t have.


The Beatles were inspired Bob Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited and The Byrds to produce Rubber Soul:

Their relationship with the Beatles was a particularly close one. George Harrison was quick to acknowledge McGuinn’s influence on his own playing, publicly admitting that his Beatles composition If I Needed Someone had been inspired by McGuinn’s guitar work on the Byrds’ recording of The Bells of Rhymney.

Brian Wilson was inspired by Rubber Soul to produce Pet Sounds:

Rubber Soul blew my mind,” Wilson remembered to Paste in 2004. “I liked the way it all went together, the way it was all one thing. It was a challenge to me to do something similar. That made me want to make Pet Sounds, I didn’t want to do the same kind of music, but on the same level. Smile. wasn’t the same kind of thing; it wasn’t anything like The Beatles. It wasn’t pop music; it was something more advanced,” he proudly stated.

Pet Sounds inspired Sgt Pepper.

We know about that one.

George had befriended Dylan and the two would work together helping each other with songs and Harrison would drag Dylan back onstage for the Concert for Bangladesh.

It was a freaking vortex of creativity.


Mark Lindsay, the talent in Paul Revere and the Raiders (who were red-hot in 1967, the best-selling rock group Columbia had ever had) was driving home when he heard the very end of Strawberry Fields on the radio, and the DJ saying it was the new single from the Beatles. So he detoured by a record shop, bought it, took it home and listened to it with his producer and roommate, Terry Melcher. When the song ended Lindsay said, “Now what the fuck are we gonna do?”
 


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