This is the way the DC Jr's should have looked

rockstar232007

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"Enjoy". Why would we enjoy seeing another vintage guitar that has been destroyed?

If it were a modern Jr., then I would be a little more understanding, because there are thousands of them around.

So sad.:(
 

EvLectric

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Horribly enough my brother had a 50's Jr with another cutaway like that added...but not converted to left hand.
 

J.T.

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Sorry. I'm just a fan of symmetry, I s'pose... ;)

And I believe that one was always a lefty, Ev.
 

hrfdez

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2K?

Nahhhhhhhhhhhh!

Thanks for posting!
 

J.T.

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Didn't say it was a deal, lol. My pudgy little fingers couldn't work a 3/4, anyway.
 

mudfinger

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That is NOT "the way the DC Jr's should have looked".
 

J.T.

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A tailpiece, a nut, some tuners a pridge and a p 90 for 2k?


No thanks.
My point has nothing to do with the auction, the price, the specific guitar, etc. I just like that kind of look with the symmetrical cutaways. That's all. If someone else doesn't, that's OK. Taste is subjective.
 

tonyj

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Back in the day.... this was a very cheap guitar.

Modifying the bridge arrangement, or swapping out the original tuners, etc., meant very little, other than a chance to improve the guitar in some way. Many early guitars were 'improved' in the sixties and into the seventies. Made them more 'reliable', and so on.

Only now, fifty or so years on, can we see that there was nothing too much wrong with the original designs. The advantages of hindsight! Fortunes have been lost, or so it would seem, or perhaps if they'd all survived intact, there might not be quite the same market for them.

Along with guitars, I happen to enjoy certain antique porcelain and pottery. Same thing happens in this field, where folks ruined vases, for instance, to convert them into reading lamps etc.. Holes drilled into them, or whatever it took. Little did they know that what they had would probably have become a valuable commodity.

Ruination of future classics is an ongoing hobby for many of us. Modifying this or that. Cars, motorcycles, and yes, guitars. How are we to know what will happen down the road .... and who really cares? :hmm:
 


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