This is terrible

Fiat Lux

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Folks up there should have raucous meetings with lots of yelling mamas. They should all blame somebody or something. Then they should really raise taxes. That'll fix it.
Too right Scott!

So far as I understand it, there ain’t a philosophical problem or inconvenient scientific truth that can’t be fixed by raising taxes...

cheers.
 

HardCore Troubadour

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your experience being this one event with your child.....sorry it happened, but that is not the norm, and to say it is, is incorrect.

With all due respect to those in the fields of education and law enforcement, and those in the courts who actually DO care about innocent kids, my experience is that those who proclaim to care first and foremost about the children are the ones who care the least - maybe there’s professional repercussions for these people if they’re wrong or something, but for whatever reason, nobody is willing to make waves or go against the grain - it’s not their job, or they can’t do anything about it, they will tell you.
 

JTM45

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-Which is another thing missing; the dinner table discussions.
Man I love this.

When we were young the whole family ate together and on Sundays we watched Wild Kingdom and Disney together

There’s not a lot of family in Baltimore, what there is is a lot of single moms with multiple kids from multiple dads, very little discipline at home once they’re big enough to talk back to their mom, the streets become their parents.

Im not defending them because they do have the choice not to be the victim but they begin life with the odds heavily against them

I understand that life, my mom was a single mom with 6 kids with very little interaction from my dad. At 22 I was dying as a result of drugs and heavy drinking and they didn’t think I’d live another couple years, I got sentenced to rehab or prison and I chose to get sober and have been clean ever since 11/16/1986.

I was in treatment with 77 others and the majority of them were black, last I heard 3 or 4 of us are still sober, the reason I say all that is because the stories I heard about growing up from others in and around Baltimore and DC were all like mine, no direction, no male role model or male companionship, social skill were learned on the streets and the morals I was taught as a kid were buried by self preservation and survival modes (do what you need to do to get high and survive)

School wasn’t even a thought growing up.

Living life the right way isn’t easy and there are saboteurs around every corner, a lot of those folks don’t and won’t have the societal skill needed to survive the so called (model Citizens) lifestyle so they go to what they know and rise their kids the same way.

I don’t know why I’m writing all of this but the odds are really against them, they need some hope and a lot of us only give them hopelessness
 

rogue3

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The kids learn irresponsible from their parents.That is an issue.But sometimes it isn't. A new start in the forces is a good option,for those who want to work.I don't know about basic training in the US., but i would imagine there is a measurable number of fails there too.
No easy answer to raising children,and one size does not fit all.But surely in this example, there could have been advance warning of impending fail??? fault the system if there wasn't. Fault the parent if she did not take the time to be involved.If there is a functioning education system in the op's example,would like to hear their perspective.
 

TheX

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When we were young the whole family ate together.
Definitely, it wasn't optional...and being late had repercussions.
 

KSG_Standard

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Perhaps a question for the folks working in education...
Are you still allowed to fail a student and hold them back? Or is there too much blowback when that is done?

Forgot who recently posted that they were no longer permitted to grade anything less than a 50% pass (or something along those lines).
My wife is a teacher and in her school, kids tend to get a lot of leeway as to the amount of work and whether or not they master a subject and whether or not they're promoted. It used to be called social promotion and it still occurs...at least in her school. It's gotten quite ridiculous since the disease which shall not be named. Under the distance "learning" scheme kids who managed to log on a couple of times were given passing grades.

The problems with education are myriad and complex. A fish rots from the head down.

The schools are incentivized, via federal and state dollars, for attendance. This can cause administrators and school boards look for ways to ignore truancy and find ways to fudge attendance numbers. Schools also get incentivized for higher graduation rates/higher test scores/higher passing rates...this causes some administrators/school boards to allow more kids to pass and/or graduate in order to get their hands on the dollars.

When the Leave no Child Behind Act was passed, part of the act required more testing of students to find out whether or not the kids are actually proficient in the subjects they're taught. This seems like a simple idea...but administrators/unions/school boards turned the idea on it's head and began "teaching to the test". Instead of teaching all of the information and subjects and counting on the kids learning, they focus on just what's on the test. This keeps the funding flowing and makes the teachers less likely to be held accountable for poor outcomes.

It's not just teachers, administrators, educrats and school boards at fault, but also the erosion of society. We've made baby mamas, baby daddies and single parent homes more accepted...in fact we've actually incentivized such outcomes and the choices and activities that lead to these outcomes. You get more money for having more children and being more of a victim of your own choices. We have generations of kids growing up with no father in the home and no focus on the value of education. Now, there are kids who have no idea of the value of a good education and no interest in it. They dream of the lifestyle of drug kingpins, rap stars, social media stars, etc.

Teachers can't be expected to solve the problems on their own. They can't, shouldn't be expected to and will never be able too, take the place of a caring family that wants and expects a better educational outcome for their kids. In the past there were always some kids who came from broken homes and who had to deal with all sorts of issues that make learning more difficult. I think it was easier for caring teachers to help the few kids in these situations. Now, there are huge numbers of kids with all sorts of problems and the teachers are overwhelmed and often underpaid.

America will decline as a great place to live...will cease to be a place where "if you can dream it, you can do it"...will cease to be a place where innovation and invention and where opportunity exists...until we fix the problems with our education system. I don't know how to fix it...but I can guarantee that simply throwing more money at the problem won't solve it. In Maryland, there the OP's story takes place, they are near the top in per pupil spending and their outcomes are near the bottom. This is true across the board, we can look at the dollars spent and see little correlation to better outcomes.

I suspect the solution starts with the family and the culture. But what do I know? I'm a product of public K-12 and state university.
 

Death Incarnate

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The undefeated record continues. No cultural or societal challenge is beyond the knowledge and wisdom of guitar collectors.
 
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LtDave32

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The undefeated record continues. No cultural or societal challenge is beyond the knowledge and wisdom of guitar collectors.
And you are the great, wise exception above us all, I suppose?
 

PapaSquash

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We have become soft . In our climate-controlled, insulated boxes, with storerooms of food, and wireless amusements we forget that the universe is always trying to kill you. As a species, we have achieved an incredible rate of survival to adulthood.

There's no need to strive or struggle, it's pretty easy to coast along. Until it isn't.

I'm one generation away from a dad who worked in a factory and had a couple of side jobs to make ends meet. He's one generation away from "join the army to avoid starvation" and hope you survive. Mom went to K-mart at night after they closed and re-folded the clothes that shoppers had messed up during the day. Then dad picked up some skills and got a union city job in water treatment, mom leaned to be a bookkeeper, and they worked their way up.

Too many people these days have no idea how this works. They assume anybody with anything had it given to them, and that individual effort doesn't affect the outcomes. It's all just a cosmic lottery to them. Why work hard at school? why demand effort, if it doesn't make any difference?
 
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ehb

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Fountain? We have a fountain? I didn't know we had a fountain.... I like fountains....

There was that one time I didn't quite understand the rules about public fountains.... They shoulda had a sign... Oh well...
 

multi-useless

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your experience being this one event with your child.....sorry it happened, but that is not the norm, and to say it is, is incorrect.
Thanks - fortunately, nothing happened directly to my kid that damaged her for life. And you may be correct that my experience is not the norm, but my experience was not one event with my child, it was multiple events with multiple teachers, school counselors, police officers, and lawyers over 8 years, any of which could have prevented the events that led to me having full custody (and likely would have kept an otherwise unrelated man alive.) Of course I’m glad I got full custody, it’s one of the best things that ever happened to me... but I digress.

Again, you might be right - hell, I hope you are! But my experience was 8 years long and involved a lot of people - though perhaps I should have been more clear on the “in my experience” part, so as not to generalize.
 


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