This Burst is a STEAL

GBLEV

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If I had money to burn and could afford this guitar, and bought it. I would play the heck out of it! Who's to say you'll ever live long enough to reap the rewards of the investment? No matter the shape you leave it in, it will sell. Will you get what you paid for out of it, or make some money on it? Who knows? You could always lend it to a famous guitar player to use for an upcoming album. That'll help! But one thing is for sure, you sure would enjoy this investment. I guess this only applies to someone who actually plays the guitar though...
 

jk60LPTH

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The one thing I always think about when I see Kirk Hammett is the youtube interview he did with Guitar Interactive Magazine and talks about when he and his wife evacuated because of the wildfires out west, and grabbed all the guitars they could and then snuck back later and got some more, but lost a few others, including one '59 LP, I think Thor's Hammer is what he called it. Greenie was already in England so that wasn't a worry. He plays Greenie in the beginning before the interview starts, un-amplified, and it's really acoustically loud.
 

zdoggie

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I got all I want at this point, yeah I very happy!

zdog
 

eric ernest

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It doesn't much matter to me if Bursts are locked in vaults or museums.

When I was coming up, you NEVER even saw a Burst.

Maybe in a magazine, maybe an album, poster, maybe once a YEAR at a show....and never got to play one.

Now, hundreds are all over my computer, TV, DVDs, concerts, at guitar shows....and friends even own them....and I've owned them.

This is inarguably the best time to be on the planet if you love Bursts.

DSCN0295.jpg
 

Mini Forklift Ⓥ

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I've often thought about the 'Peter Green LP', in the sense that despite its name I can imagine that Gary Moore actually played it more than Peter did. Who out of the two owned it longer?

Can't say I'm a Kirk Hammett fan but at least he isn't afraid to play it, would be a shame for that guitar to get locked away and never see the sunlight
 

jk60LPTH

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I think it's cited in the youtube interview I mentioned above

From another article, Peter Green bought it around 1966 during his Bluesbreakers days, loaned it to Gary Moore around the late 70's after Green had been struggling with mental health issues for most of that decade, and sold it to Moore for $300, which is what Green had originally paid for it. In 2006 Moore sold it to Phil Winfield at Maverick Guitars for somewhere between $750k and $1.2 M due to money problems. It remained at Maverick Guitars until 2014 when Kirk Hammett bought it for reportedly about $2M, lower that what Maverick had been asking for it, but Hammett made the owner of Maverick his offer at a time when the owner needed money. All for a guitar who's distinct sound is due in part to someone at the factory installing one of the pickup coils backwards... Bonamassa has a '59 made at about the same time that has the same error in it. from "One Legendary Guitar: Three Legendary Owners - The Greenie Moore Les Paul"
 

eric ernest

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I think it's cited in the youtube interview I mentioned above

In 2006 Moore sold it to Phil Winfield at Maverick Guitars for somewhere between $750k and $1.2 M due to money problems. It remained at Maverick Guitars until 2014 when Kirk Hammett bought it for reportedly about $2M, lower that what Maverick had been asking for it, but Hammett made the owner of Maverick his offer at a time when the owner needed money.
None of this is true. The price, the owner, the dates. Not even close.

The court ordered the guitar removed from Maverick Music and placed in storage around 2008. The guitar was owned by Melvyn Franks. Maverick just handled the purchase.

In 2014 Maverick was busy getting their ass sued by John Mayer...

John Mayer Lawsuit.

Greenie was bought from Gary for around $350K and sold to Kirk for about the same. There is some discrepancy as to whether it was paid in dollars or pounds.

Richard Henry handled the sale and knows all of the details.
 

shark

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the thing about those guitars are they come with karma and a soul that extracts a price from its humans. either in blood sweat tears or the endless pain of joy.

just bec you got the cash for these items doesnt mean you got the guts or the skill to deal with its earth binding cost to you mentally physically and an emotionally bankrupting extraction of your life force
 

sws1

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And that's an important part of it. Read about Don Felder's '59. It's in a vault and he only has taken it out once in the past few years, for a recording session. When he plays gigs he uses one of the two reproductions Gibson gave him when they released his signature model LP. And in his interview, he said it's hard for him to tell the difference in the way they look and sound. And a lot of other guitarist's keep there guitars in vaults too. Hard Rock Cafe has a whole bunch of guitars in their vaults, mainly because of who owned them.
It's so easy (and common) to sight those who don't play their guitars. Yet it simply does not reflect the broader reality. There are plenty of people who play their old guitars. They just aren't someone you know or can track online. Nor would it fit into the more comforting narrative that it's just a bunch of rich snobs. (We mock what we don't understand.)
 

mbm1972

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Interesting thread. All I can say is that I play my ‘58 ‘burst most days and gig it whenever it’s safe to do so. I know I’m fortunate. It may well be an “asset” but to me it is a fabulous instrument and the realisation of a lifetime dream.
Young concert violinists (among many other examples) have been known to take out mortgage-sized loans to acquire a Stratovarius (or piano players, a grand steinway, etc.) that they can use throughout the lifespan of their careers. No one bats an eyelash when that happens because it's generally considered necessary equipment at the pinnacle of classical music. Not to mention, they're really good investments and the violinist will always get their money back (barring violin catastrophe, that is, and then that's why we have insurance!).

Where would we be without enthusiasts (of all stripes)?
 

mbm1972

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It's a strange phenomenon- when you grow up poor (even if you don't know you're poor), often, later in life when you made your bones, it's hard for you to not be 'thrifty'.
Oh, you're preaching to the choir on that point - I totally get that.

But just to clarify, I wasn't defending or attacking the virtue of a guitar as an investment asset, nor was I advocating that such an investment would be my choice. I was merely trying to elaborate on the phenomenon of people investing in objects outside the "traditional" asset classes, and the mechanisms that are involved.

The land example you shared is analogous with the example I shared about my '83 LP in another post (bought new in '89 for $800, saw the same model/color sell last month on ebay for $8k). I certainly didn't buy it to be an investment (I didn't even know what an investment was at 16!). I bought it and played the hell out of it - and still do. But, as it turns out, it was a bit of an investment as well - albeit incidentally.
 

stilwel

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That's the price of a moderately sized house in a decent neighborhood here in Phoenix.
 

Haprom

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Greenie was bought from Gary for around $350K and sold to Kirk for about the same. There is some discrepancy as to whether it was paid in dollars or pounds.
If it was Paid in Pounds,,, I Wonder how Goood it Was...:rofl:
 

TheWhigs

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That's the price of a moderately sized house in a decent neighborhood here in Phoenix.
One would be hard-pressed to find a one bedroom in Silicon Valley at that price. Mobile homes, yes one can find a 2-3 bedroom mobile home for that price but not a "traditional" home.
 

Cory

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All kidding aside, let's say you started out your young adult life with $300 in your bank account, an old car and $100 in your pocket. You got a good job, worked hard, moved up the ladder, lived modestly but comfortably, saved and invested some of that money your whole life, and 40 years later you could now afford to by 10 of these $350k guitars. Would you buy this guitar, knowing how hard you hard to work and what it took you to earn that amount of money for a guitar that would probably spend most of it's life in a vault somewhere, that you couldn't take out in public to play without risking it being stolen at gunpoint, or worse? Would you buy it when you knew you could by an amazing guitar for $10k or less and use your good fortune to make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate around you and be grateful that you had the means to do so? What would you do? What would you really do?
To answer your question…yes I think I would - I’m assuming it’s most everyone’s dream on this forum to own an authentic 50’s burst - but my answer is coming from a place of knowing I could never afford one, but more so if I hit the lottery or had a ton of disposable income, I’d for sure buy one and play it/treasure it for the rest of my life, then pass it to my children.
 

RuneDanmark

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Young concert violinists (among many other examples) have been known to take out mortgage-sized loans to acquire a Stratovarius (or piano players, a grand steinway, etc.) that they can use throughout the lifespan of their careers. No one bats an eyelash when that happens because it's generally considered necessary equipment at the pinnacle of classical music. Not to mention, they're really good investments and the violinist will always get their money back (barring violin catastrophe, that is, and then that's why we have insurance!).

Where would we be without enthusiasts (of all stripes)?
I would like to meet those violin players who can afford a stratovarius.

If we take into account of what smithsonian writes.

"Stradivari also made harps, guitars, violas, and cellos--more than 1,100 instruments in all, by current estimate. About 650 of these instruments survive today."

Sure even back then they made many copies of the Stradivari instruments and labeled them as Stratovarius. But they were copies.

The originals goes from 1,5 millions euro (the record is about 11 million euros). No sane bank it going to give out a loan on that amount to a young musician. Just think about that Insurance you need to have to even get approved to such a loan, if you even CAN get an insurance for an object like that.

I'm not saying its impossible for a violinist to be wealthy, but mostly when they are using those crazy expensive violins, they are borrowed out from the real owners, so the violins get out to public once in a while.
 


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