This Burst is a STEAL

Uncle Vinnie

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That one's been for sale quite a while, hasn't it?

I know they had one with a picture from the 1970s of the previous owner playing it, wearing a shirt that read "boogie until you puke" or something like that.
 

Liam

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Thought I recognised that blanket. Stinger 1959 Les Paul Standard from a highly reputable dealer. I think probably is a steal. Maybe one day, maybe not a stinger...

Liam
 

jk60LPTH

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All kidding aside, let's say you started out your young adult life with $300 in your bank account, an old car and $100 in your pocket. You got a good job, worked hard, moved up the ladder, lived modestly but comfortably, saved and invested some of that money your whole life, and 40 years later you could now afford to by 10 of these $350k guitars. Would you buy this guitar, knowing how hard you hard to work and what it took you to earn that amount of money for a guitar that would probably spend most of it's life in a vault somewhere, that you couldn't take out in public to play without risking it being stolen at gunpoint, or worse? Would you buy it when you knew you could by an amazing guitar for $10k or less and use your good fortune to make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate around you and be grateful that you had the means to do so? What would you do? What would you really do?
 

Joe A

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All kidding aside, let's say you started out your young adult life with $300 in your bank account, an old car and $100 in your pocket. You got a good job, worked hard, moved up the ladder, lived modestly but comfortably, saved and invested some of that money your whole life, and 40 years later you could now afford to by 10 of these $350k guitars. Would you buy this guitar, knowing how hard you hard to work and what it took you to earn that amount of money for a guitar that would probably spend most of it's life in a vault somewhere, that you couldn't take out in public to play without risking it being stolen at gunpoint, or worse? Would you buy it when you knew you could by an amazing guitar for $10k or less and use your good fortune to make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate around you and be grateful that you had the means to do so? What would you do? What would you really do?
Why stop there? You can get a $100 guitar, wear used shoes & divert 94% of you income to those less fortunate. Do you even need a guitar? :facepalm:

Personally I'd offer $350K for the guitar...which they'll gladly accept & with the money left over I'd pay someone to read forum posts to me just so I can interrupt & yell "NEXT!" whenever I sense virtue signaling... or any other morality police's random thoughts on socialism... all while throwing partially eaten chicken wings at the heads of those mere R9 wielding plebs :band:
 

mbm1972

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All kidding aside, let's say you started out your young adult life with $300 in your bank account, an old car and $100 in your pocket. You got a good job, worked hard, moved up the ladder, lived modestly but comfortably, saved and invested some of that money your whole life, and 40 years later you could now afford to by 10 of these $350k guitars. Would you buy this guitar, knowing how hard you hard to work and what it took you to earn that amount of money for a guitar that would probably spend most of it's life in a vault somewhere, that you couldn't take out in public to play without risking it being stolen at gunpoint, or worse? Would you buy it when you knew you could by an amazing guitar for $10k or less and use your good fortune to make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate around you and be grateful that you had the means to do so? What would you do? What would you really do?
You make a valid point, and I get where you are coming from. But when an object attains asset-class status, it ceases to be about what the object was originally intended to be. In this case, it was a guitar, but now it's an asset that can be used as a store of value, like a house, treasury bill, stocks, gold, etc. It's just another asset class and offers the buyer a means of diversifying their portfolio, albeit with a very "alternative" investment class. It's like wealthy people buying a vintage Ferrari, or Picasso, etc. It's merely an investment to store value and, ideally, generate some growth in equity over time.

This scenario makes me feel sad for the guitar, because, as you pointed out, they buyer would most likely store it away (unless they also happen to be an eccentric musician who actually plays!).
 

jk60LPTH

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Why stop there? You can get a $100 guitar, wear used shoes & divert 94% of you income to those less fortunate. Do you even need a guitar? :facepalm:

Personally I'd offer $350K for the guitar...which they'll gladly accept & with the money left over I'd pay someone to read forum posts to me just so I can interrupt & yell "NEXT!" whenever I sense virtue signaling... or any other morality police's random thoughts on socialism... all while throwing partially eaten chicken wings at the heads of those mere R9 wielding plebs :band:
Joe A, I am not judging you, or anyone else here on whatever choice they made regarding my question. If my question would have been 'How do feel about being a serial killer", I tend to be a little more judgmental about things like that. As far this talk of yours on 'sensing virtue signaling.... or other morality police's random thoughts on socialism..." that comes from inside of you, Joe, that has nothing to do with who I am, or what I said. I simply asked the question, without judgement of how anyone answers, even you.
 

rockbeare

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Interesting thread. All I can say is that I play my ‘58 ‘burst most days and gig it whenever it’s safe to do so. I know I’m fortunate. It may well be an “asset” but to me it is a fabulous instrument and the realisation of a lifetime dream.
 

Joe A

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Joe A, I am not judging you, or anyone else here on whatever choice they made regarding my question. If my question would have been 'How do feel about being a serial killer", I tend to be a little more judgmental about things like that. As far this talk of yours on 'sensing virtue signaling.... or other morality police's random thoughts on socialism..." that comes from inside of you, Joe, that has nothing to do with who I am, or what I said. I simply asked the question, without judgement of how anyone answers, even you.
Indeed the reply came from me. :).

You can say you are without judgement but I don't believe that to be true.

Why else wound one raise the question?
 

jk60LPTH

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You make a valid point, and I get where you are coming from. But when an object attains asset-class status, it ceases to be about what the object was originally intended to be. In this case, it was a guitar, but now it's an asset that can be used as a store of value, like a house, treasury bill, stocks, gold, etc. It's just another asset class and offers the buyer a means of diversifying their portfolio, albeit with a very "alternative" investment class. It's like wealthy people buying a vintage Ferrari, or Picasso, etc. It's merely an investment to store value and, ideally, generate some growth in equity over time.

This scenario makes me feel sad for the guitar, because, as you pointed out, they buyer would most likely store it away (unless they also happen to be an eccentric musician who actually plays!).
The investment side of this question is a valid one, so examining that, some real world examples from my life. I bought some land about 40 years ago. I'm about to sell it for 10 times what I paid for it. Land value accrues by some pretty predictable forces, inflation and location. If you told me 40 years ago it would be worth 10x what I paid for it, I would have bought a lot more. But now, it turns out, it's the worst investment I ever made. Not because I didn't make money on it, but because I made less on it than any other investment I've ever made. I don't feel too bad about it though, because I didn't buy it as an investment, I bought it to be close to my grandmother who raised me, but she died before that happened.
As an investment, I think a guitar is a very unpredictable one, because it's value driven mostly by emotion and supply and demand. The supply part is obvious.... the more that time passes, there will be no more made. The demand part and emotional part are unknowns, but I think as time goes by the value will peak and then fall because those of us that were around to hear the sound they could make and formed a lifelong attachment to that and the music that they made will continue to die off, and the following generations have their own sound and music that is imprinting on them, so when those generations become wealthy enough to spend money on 50's Les Pauls and vintage tube amps, will they venerate them the same way that I do? My guess is, not that likely. And monetary value is only what the general population perceive it to be. Other than guitars, I totally agree with you about diversifying assets, but I've always been a buy-and-holder, not day trader. So while buying that guitar might be a good investment in the short term if that's one's goal, it doesn't fit into my long-term investment strategy. The other problem, and this one is just for me: when a buy a guitar, it's because I love it, for the shear happiness it gives me. That makes for a lousy investment, I think it's a huge mistake to buy something for an investment because you love it. I love cars too, Picasso, meh..., so maybe that's a good investment for me too. But cars- I love sports cars, so if it weren't for a Lambo's price, I'd buy one, but I do have a 'love-to-price' ratio that I try not to exceed. It's a strange phenomenon- when you grow up poor (even if you don't know you're poor), often, later in life when you made your bones, it's hard for you to not be 'thrifty'.
 
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rialcnis

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Let's bring up the successful use of a 50's Les Paul and how your own use of it is a public reality. The guitar is worth more to a buyer if it becomes a famous guitar, than one played by a mostly unknown player.

if Jimmy Page's number one guitar was a modified, goldtop '52- '56 with Humbuckers, rather than a '59, burst, then it is possible the modified '52- '56 would be the most sought after, as an investment.

So playing your treasure well, might be the best return, rather than keeping it in a vault untouched.
 

jk60LPTH

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This scenario makes me feel sad for the guitar, because, as you pointed out, they buyer would most likely store it away (unless they also happen to be an eccentric musician who actually plays!).
And that's an important part of it. Read about Don Felder's '59. It's in a vault and he only has taken it out once in the past few years, for a recording session. When he plays gigs he uses one of the two reproductions Gibson gave him when they released his signature model LP. And in his interview, he said it's hard for him to tell the difference in the way they look and sound. And a lot of other guitarist's keep there guitars in vaults too. Hard Rock Cafe has a whole bunch of guitars in their vaults, mainly because of who owned them.
 


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