There is No Longer a Real Job known as LUTHIER

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jaxondi

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I realize this is nearly a dead thread, but I thought I'd throw in my 2 cents.
I used to share some of the beliefs of Steve2. I thought "How could a brand new guitar NOT be superior to an old guitar?". I took my brand new Ibanez S model bubinga curly top over to my friends house to show it off. After I finished playing it he said,"Yeah, that's nice. Try that one over there". That one over there was a '58 stratocaster. We plugged it in to an original tweed twin that he owns.
I left his house a more educated man.
 

edouglaspratt

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If you know of someone who does this for a living , and nothing else, take a picture because that person will be dead pretty soon and they will be taking the job with them. there will always be people that fix guitars on a part time basis, and people will also make 1-off guitars.

The violin business will be around for a long while, and that is what will happen to them.
Sorry but I don't follow this...1) Luthiers will be no longer...2) some people will do this part-time...3) and "that" is what will happen to people in the violin business...4) which will be around a long time...? Can you explain how these four connect?
 

Damaged262

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I bet @steve2 doesn't even play the guitar. He's probably a flautist whose girlfriend dumped him for a guitarist (or worse, a luthier) and now he's bitter.

There are people that make their livings from carving wooden spoons, so I wouldn't worry about those crazy mainstream luthiers just yet. Just because you might not be able to make a living at it doesn't mean that someone else can't. People have been claiming the death of just about every industry since the dawn of technology. We haven't really doomed too many occupations in the last several hundred years; people still want stuff and services.
Not for anything, but he's not a flautist, he's a florist. But i totally get your point. For real tho, many hand working businesses will be golden in the next 20 years, until someone figures out how to manipulate woods as craft materials in a super non-moisture fashion, too bad humidity doesn't work the same for all, then we could just ship all our jobs....
 
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Warren Weldon

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If you know of someone who does this for a living , and nothing else, take a picture because that person will be dead pretty soon and they will be taking the job with them. there will always be people that fix guitars on a part time basis, and people will also make 1-off guitars.

The violin business will be around for a long while, and that is what will happen to them.
It is all I have done for 40 years except for a 1 year stint as Road manger for Peter Rowan and Tony Rice but I still repaired and kept a project with me the entire time.
 

Biebers_Monkey

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I think Scott has a lot of great content on YouTube and some really nice lessons. To each their own. Cheers.
 

NiteGoat

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I live and work in a city with a population of 116,000. Luthiers workshop down the street. Maybe I'm lucky, or maybe you did not look too hard. As has been said it they have never been on every street corner and it has never paid well, but try a small time music shop and they can point you to a Luthier/repair guy, if not do it themselves (many music shop owners know their instruments... surprisingly enough)
I've found that if you play guitar, either you know and have your own luthier, or you know another player who knows a luthier. My luthier also passed his sorcery onto another luthier in his shop. They are masters of their craft.

I may as well give them a plug while I'm at it - Top Gear in La Mesa, CA (San Diego). Although I moved to Detroit a year ago and have yet to need the services of a luthier, I had a friend here who is a professional musician, turn me on to his old luthier. He now uses Reverend Guitars for his luthier needs. I love my luthiers at Top Gear in La, Mesa so much, that I have even thought of shipping my guitars to them if I needed any work done.

I don't foresee the extinction of the luthier.
 

vintageguitarz

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I've been a Luthier for 38 years after (and during) being a guitarist (guitar, bass and lap steel, also drums and keyboard as needed) in bands and studios. I've been making Guitars, Banjos, Lutes, Mandolins since a early teen but didn't study under a professional Luthier until my late 20's. While I don't construct Violins to Upright Basses, I can tear them apart and rebuild/repair them. Now I prefer only to build, repair or restore Guitars, Banjos and Mandolins. If we are a dying trade, you better tell the 3 out of 5 customers I and other Luthiers have to turn away because we just don't have the time in a week to do their bidding.

This original post is absurb and frankly stupid as it shows absolutely no research was done. While I've just turned 68, my regular and new clients will do anything to keep me from shopping for a casket any time soon. Duffass.
 

Derek Hall

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I have only just picked up on this thread. Seems to me that the originator confuses luthiery with guitar production. A luthier, like myself, makes a stringed instrument from start to finish. And at age 69, I am still using the same hand tools that I started out with! There will always be luthiers like myself because, it is not a job - it is a calling. Also, there will always be musicians who seek luthiers like me because they appreciate that an instrument built by a luthier has something of the soul of its builder built into its very fabric.
 

JMT Guitars

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I thought halloween was the time when the dead rose from the grave. I THOUGHT WE LET THIS IDOCY DIE!!!
 

JeffRev01

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After reading many of the comments to this thread and the original post I am pretty certain that @steve2 should have clarified his point because he goes in two different directions and has tossed out apples and oranges and called them the same thing. His follow on comments are all about the decline of Guitar making by US companies and how cheaper foreign made instruments are equal in quality to their US counterparts from 40 years ago. If you dismiss the troll aspect you would have to agree to some of this. There are some amazing guitars coming out of Korea (see just about any PRS SE or Schecter) and even China and Indonesia. That being said, it really has nothing to do with the future of the luthier craftsman.

When cheap foreign cars started flooding the US market after the late 70’s people didn’t just dispose of their old broken ones to buy new ones in lieu of getting them repaired. There will always be a disposable guitar market but quality instruments, no matter where they are made, will be taken for service and repaired by the people who have invested in them and love them. This is why the luthier will persist. The biggest threat to the luthier profession isn’t the demise of large guitar companies. Rather it’s the lack of education available for skilled craftsmen. Much like music programs have been disappearing from our schools, so have shop classes. We need to infuse some passion for woodworking into our youth and give them skills that they can carry forward in life. My 2¢.
 

Vmcompetello

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I do not understand why if all the major guitar makers close down or sell-off why the luthier trade will be defunct? That's like saying an auto manufacturer closed down and now auto repair shops will perish. Makes no sense this thread does!
 

vonrang

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If you know of someone who does this for a living , and nothing else, take a picture because that person will be dead pretty soon and they will be taking the job with them. there will always be people that fix guitars on a part time basis, and people will also make 1-off guitars.

The violin business will be around for a long while, and that is what will happen to them.
 

vintageguitarz

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I do not understand why if all the major guitar makers close down or sell-off why the luthier trade will be defunct? That's like saying an auto manufacturer closed down and now auto repair shops will perish. Makes no sense this thread does!
The OP premise is as ludicrous as the idea that "all the major guitar makers close down". What, are we only going to have, only "vintage" (anything up to 2018) guitars to buy, play and they won't ever need repair of modifications?? Idiotic.
 

Bill Hicklin

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The root of this silly post is the OP falling for Gibson rather absurdly giving its assembly-line workers the title of "luthier," which is on a par with some cities calling their garbagemen "sanitation engineers." No, they're assembly-line workers. Gibson does have some luthiers on staff, mostly in the Custom Shop, but a guy who sticks wood in a machine and presses a button, over and over again, is not a luthier.
 
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