The Other Single-Cuts Classifieds (read the rules before posting)

saxosim

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Hi All

For sale is my super rare 1986 Greco Mint Collection Doublecut. This is an amazing guitar and has had upgrades over the years by the previous owners including a Gibson p90 pickup fitted, bourns pots, a better tortoise pickguard and a better cap fitted. She's seen a life and has been gigged and enjoyed so has plenty of marks, small dings and scratches to show but is a great guitar. Made in Japan and built to last. The strap button was moved to the horn previously by a previous owner but I moved it back to the original position now. She also looks to have had a switch or something added at some point as a hole has been filled and paint touched in between the volume and tone knob. She has also suffered a slight crack near the neck heel previously but the previous owner who is a mate had her repaired professionally by John at JXG guitars in Newcastle and it is absolutely solid. She is also a fair old weight at approx 9lbs but my god such a tone monster.

The neck profile I would say is a typical mid 50's type it's not baseball bat thick and its also not crazily skinny either. It also has a long tenon.

Any questions please ask. Looking for £450 ovno.

Located in Killingworth in Newcastle upon Tyne. Collection is preferred as I would prefer the buyer to see and play her first, I love worn and played guitars so I would say that if you like mint case queen guitars then this one really isn't for you. If you like a reliable workhorse which sounds great and is full of mojo this is it. I can discuss postage options at the buyers cost.

No trades thanks















 

silverkw

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2012 Tokai HLS 240 SF refinished top. The HLS series has 3.7 degree neck plane angle, which makes the bridge sit nice and low like vintage guitars. Other than that, the appointments were similar to those of regular Tokai series.

This is easily one of the best Tokai, or even Les Paul that I have owned. 9.3 lbs, one piece back, fat 59's neck, Madagascar fret board, nice low neck angle, Tokai original brown/pink case. The original finish on the guitar is lacquer top (lacquer-over-poly).

It has some normal wear and tear on the body & top. Refinished top is in a nice nitro shin, but not glossy like poly finish. Frets are in very good condition.

There's a bit of red/brown over spray on the body that can show slightly "grainy" comparing to a factory finish, but they blend in with the body color well, and not noticeable at all from 3 feet away.

Refinishing process:
http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/showthread.php?t=376507

Modification:
- Sanded off the paper thin veneer
- Refinished top with nitro
- M69 rings (from Gibson Historic then painted lighter cream) - Original rings included
- Strap lock pings - Original pings included

$1450 USD shipped and paypal'd in US, $1420 USD for Canada.

More pictures: http://s35.photobucket.com/user/silverkw/slideshow/Tokai HLS 240 SF



 

silverkw

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Price drop:
$1350 USD shipped and paypal'd in US, $1320 USD for Canada.

2012 Tokai HLS 240 SF refinished top. The HLS series has 3.7 degree neck plane angle, which makes the bridge sit nice and low like vintage guitars. Other than that, the appointments were similar to those of regular Tokai series.

This is easily one of the best Tokai, or even Les Paul that I have owned. 9.3 lbs, one piece back, fat 59's neck, Madagascar fret board, nice low neck angle, Tokai original brown/pink case. The original finish on the guitar is lacquer top (lacquer-over-poly).

It has some normal wear and tear on the body & top. Refinished top is in a nice nitro shin, but not glossy like poly finish. Frets are in very good condition.

There's a bit of red/brown over spray on the body that can show slightly "grainy" comparing to a factory finish, but they blend in with the body color well, and not noticeable at all from 3 feet away.

Refinishing process:
http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/showthread.php?t=376507

Modification:
- Sanded off the paper thin veneer
- Refinished top with nitro
- M69 rings (from Gibson Historic then painted lighter cream) - Original rings included
- Strap lock pings - Original pings included

$1450 USD shipped and paypal'd in US, $1420 USD for Canada.

More pictures: http://s35.photobucket.com/user/silverkw/slideshow/Tokai HLS 240 SF
 

Floyd Pink

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Greco EG58-120 1983

Might have to let this go. 1983 Mint Collection EG58-120, successor to the EGF-1200. Very resonant, lightweight guitar at only 3,9 kg. Two-piece back. Honey/Lemon-burst veneer top. Sounds very nice, very open and airy.

Professional refret with medium jumbos, original hardware and electronics, except possibly the tailpiece. 500k pots and PIO caps. Possibly original Dry 82 in bridge position (unfortunately, sticker is long gone) and a 1978 Maxon pickup in neck position (U1000, U2000 or PU2). Neck sounds crystal clear, while the bridge position is very well balanced and has nice bite. Pickup rings are Montreux M69 repros. Will include an aged cover for the neck pickup as well.

I have tried a few Greco's, but most of them were much heavier than this. If anyone wants to install Z's or some nice PAF’s in it, we can discuss price without pickups.

EUR 1690 + shipping (no tax within EU)




Edit:
Here is a quick clip of the guitar. Just the raw files panned 50% left and right, no processing. For the lead I am switching between the neck and bridge pickup. Just the Greco straight into a Marshall 50W at moderate volume.
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/37695815/Greco EG58-120 Capi Test.wav
 

Jenzzz

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Oh man... - I'm seriously tempted. :(

Hi All

For sale is my super rare 1986 Greco Mint Collection Doublecut. This is an amazing guitar and has had upgrades over the years by the previous owners including a Gibson p90 pickup fitted, bourns pots, a better tortoise pickguard and a better cap fitted. She's seen a life and has been gigged and enjoyed so has plenty of marks, small dings and scratches to show but is a great guitar. Made in Japan and built to last. The strap button was moved to the horn previously by a previous owner but I moved it back to the original position now. She also looks to have had a switch or something added at some point as a hole has been filled and paint touched in between the volume and tone knob. She has also suffered a slight crack near the neck heel previously but the previous owner who is a mate had her repaired professionally by John at JXG guitars in Newcastle and it is absolutely solid. She is also a fair old weight at approx 9lbs but my god such a tone monster.

The neck profile I would say is a typical mid 50's type it's not baseball bat thick and its also not crazily skinny either. It also has a long tenon.

Any questions please ask. Looking for £450 ovno.

Located in Killingworth in Newcastle upon Tyne. Collection is preferred as I would prefer the buyer to see and play her first, I love worn and played guitars so I would say that if you like mint case queen guitars then this one really isn't for you. If you like a reliable workhorse which sounds great and is full of mojo this is it. I can discuss postage options at the buyers cost.

No trades thanks
 

rocknrolla

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21stcsm

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I write about financial-related things as part of my freelance work. Some of what I am seeing here is wrong, misleading, or very incomplete. Here's something that is, hopefully, a little more helpful:

MauiCliff cites December 31, 1981, which I personally find to be a rather odd day to pick if you're looking to compare the USD to JPY. For one thing, it's the last possible day of the year. For another, it's during the US holiday season, which does affect the market. If you pick a different day in 1981, you get a wildly different answer. 180000 was equal to $786 on a random day I picked in July, the middle of the year. The same in September, the same in October. In May and March it was in the lower 800s. So if someone were to ask me: "In general, what was 180000 JPY worth in USD in 1981," I'd answer, "In general, about 800 bucks."

http://fxtop.com/en/currency-converter-past.php?A=180000&C1=JPY&C2=USD&DD=07&MM=07&YYYY=1981&B=1&P=&I=1&btnOK=Go!

Using US government statistics, the "buying power" of 800 US bucks in '81 was equivalent to 2,121 USD today. http://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm

This in and of itself tells us very little. So let's keep going.

Rather using ketchup or refrigerators as examples, let's use a guitar. Some very quick Googling suggests that in 1981, a Les Paul Custom could be had for 650 American bucks, retail. Adjusted into today's buying power, that's $1723.
Today, a Gibson Les Paul Custom, in the non-exotic finishes and appointments, can be had for 4,800 retail. http://www.sweetwater.com/store/search.php?s=Gibson+Les+Paul+Custom&Go=Search

However, today you can buy a 1981 Les Paul Custom for anywhere between 2200 and 3200. Let's spitball an average of 2750.

So:
A) The equivalent of 180000 Yen in 1981 was not in the high 800s. It was about 800.

B) When you compare the appreciation of a guitar in US Dollars to the rate of inflation, a guitar (or, at least, a Les Paul Custom) for this timeframe, it appreciates at 423%, versus inflation's 265% for this timeframe. (My note: this point was edited with correct data and computations.)

C) Gibson Les Paul Customs' have very little correlation with inflation. In other words, they are not a good indicator of inflation. A $650 Les Paul Custom, adjusted for inflation, costs $1723 in today's dollars. Today, a Gibson Les Paul Custom costs nearly $5K. Inflation is not that bad by a long-shot. So it would be totally wrong to say "Inflation is so bad that back in '81, you could buy an LPC for $650. Now it's $4800!"

D) With regards to Les Paul Customs, you could say that a $650 investment in one of them in 1981 grows to $2750 in 2016. But you could also say that $650 in 1981 had the buying power of $1,723 in today's USD. So: an '81 LPC has appreciated 61% (which is pretty crazy, given, you know, major indices).

E) In 1981, an EGF1800 could be had for roughly $800 USD. That's $2,121 adjusted for inflation. Now, if you believe that this makes sense, and if you believe that a Greco EGF1800 has the same appreciation of a Gibson Les Paul Custom, then it should have appreciated 61%. Roughly speaking: $3,414 USD.

That's a big (second) if there in E (which is why I put it in bold). Have Greco EGF1800s appreciated similarly to Gibson Les Paul Customs? If so, then JKBird59 is offering a killer deal. Then, again, if you think that the guitar is worth now what it was worth then, the guitar should be roughly 2100.

Me, I have no dog in this fight whatsoever. I don't think JKBird is being unfair even if I think 3100 is a crazy price for a Greco. (And, really, I don't even think that: I have no opinion, because I don't really like Grecos based on the two I've owned, and I don't know enough about them.) I think these guitars are too rare, and the market is too nichey to ever say "they appreciate at X%." At this point, I'm sick of Googling stuff, but I wonder what a 1985 Burny RLC-60 cost in 1985. You can still get those for well under a grand.

(Note: edited throughout for further clarification, and one correction.)
I'm into finance. The reason I started buying MIJ guitars was I was trading currency pairs and I figured with the dollar buying so many Yen - good time to look at Japanese guitar market

I converted some dollars into Yen back when it was around 120 and I still have some left. The charts said - hedge a rise in Yen vs the USD by buying when we are at a multiyear yen low

I'm wanking about this to say this is a major area of interest to me. I won't make claims about 'expertise'

So with that as a background - let me say GREAT POST

there is a low signal/noise ratio on the intertubes when it comes to discussions of these issues you addressed and you singlehandedly boosted the ratio!

congrats and thank you
 

21stcsm

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That's easy. Japanese guitars have their sales-price in their names.
RLC-60 = ¥60,000
EGF1800 = ¥180,000

etc.

:)
Generally speaking they are LIST PRICES not always the prices they RETAIL for

Usually they ACTUALLY SELL at less

As I've noted I track this stuff in excel over time so I can make better decisions

A HLS240 does NOT sell for 240,000 Yrn

The #'s are useful to compare INTRAbrand and to a lesser extent INTERbrand but it's often the case that the entire line sell
At a discount of X% from the Yen # in the guitar name
 

21stcsm

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You mean MSRP.
Damn skippy I do!

Exactly

The # in the name is useful because the ratio holds (an 80 will sell for roughly 80% of a 100) but more likely the 80 sells for like 60 or whatever

Based on a metric asaload of data points - it's almost always lower (actual price) than the built in MSRP

It's more accurate INTRAbrand - the 80 will
Be 4/5 the 100
Selling price in the same brand but INTERbrand there is often a differential - company A 's 80 may sell for less than Conpany B's 80

But as is always the case GIGO

so if you start with the assumption that the 1980 LP80 sold for 80,000 1980 Yen and then do the calculations you miss that the 1980
LP80 sold for 73,000 1980 Yen

so the multipliers are robust, the raw #'s not necessarily

You can find pdf's or even (God forbid it's still out there) microfiche etc of actual price sheets from back in the day which is really useful



N' stuff
 

paruwi

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Please go back 'on topic'

this is a 'classifieds' thread

and not a 'financial-discussion' thread

Thanks !
 


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