The Norlin Threat

GLSmith

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The Norlin era guitars have a lot going for them. The maple necks are far more durable than the mahogany necks. The electronics were still top rate and some of Gibson's most iconic pickups come from this era. The original dirty fingers and the Tim Shaw's are some of Gibson's best in my opinion. Gibson did a lot of experimenting in this era. There are many models that originated during this time and became staples of the Gibson lineup. And let's not forget that many of today's collectors grew up during the Norlin era so these are the guitars we lusted after in the music stores as kids.
 

The Golden Boy

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I guess it sorta depends on what is desirable to you.

If it’s about having an “old” guitar- then a Norlin is desirable. If that’s what you’re into. Or if you value the features of those guitars over “vintage” features.

People who want that ‘old’ Gibson look and feel are either going to gravitate towards old guitars or Historics or guitars that have those “vintage” features.
 
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DBDM

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This thread got me thinking about "what is next" with Gibson trends. One guitar (several iterations) that can still be purchased for CHEAP is the much ignored Gibson Superstrat (again several variants). NOTHING wrong with those guitars and can be purchased (with some looking and diligence) for $500 or less. Those Norlin and post norlin era guitars could be "re-discovered". Another (non-Norlin) guitar that is not often discussed but may be one of the best guitars I have ever played is the Gibson Country Gentleman. Spectacular.

Edit--in looking at Gibson Superstrat prices today (have not looked in a while) it seems my prediction is a little late to the party. They are selling for substantially more than the last time I looked. I am a regular guitar Nostradamus.
 
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PeteNJ75

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Personally I don’t think it’s going to affect that market. People that can afford bursts will continue to buy bursts while the rest of us will continue to look for somewhat affordable deals on Norlins. I just think the buyers are in such vastly different economic stratas that one won’t affect the other. Norlins could continue to be really hot and skyrocket in value, but I just don’t see burst buyers to be swayed in any way.

And for what it’s worth, I own ‘71 and ‘74 Customs, and have owned a ‘76 and ‘78 as well, and they are/were all fantastic sounding and playing guitars, built like tanks. They’re all right around 10 lbs on the nose, which to some may be too heavy, but with the right strap I don’t find them uncomfortable at all. I’m actually about to go pick up my ‘71 who just got its first refret after the fretless wonder frets were practically worn down to the board. That guitar sounds incredible, so I’m excited for it to be playable again. I guess my point is just that I’ve never understood the bad rep Norlin-era guitars get. I think they’re some of the best-sounding and playing vintage guitars mere mortals like myself can afford.
 

1981 LPC

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This thread got me thinking about "what is next" with Gibson trends. One guitar (several iterations) that can still be purchased for CHEAP is the much ignored Gibson Superstrat (again several variants). NOTHING wrong with those guitars and can be purchased (with some looking and diligence) for $500 or less. Those Norlin and post norlin era guitars could be "re-discovered". Another (non-Norlin) guitar that is not often discussed but may be one of the best guitars I have ever played is the Gibson Country Gentleman. Spectacular.
What's the name of the LP-esque model Gibson did in the early nineties? I remember looking at them in my teens... not the best looking design ever. Never played one though.

Edit: the Nighthawk.

Yikes. Still... 25,5 inch scale. Might be interesting.
8b72c4d3633b1ded596aa5d252bbb7ff.jpg
 
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CB91710

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What's the name of the LP-esque model Gibson did in the early nineties? I remember looking at them in my teens... not the best looking design ever. Never played one though.

Edit: the Nighthawk.

Yikes. Still... 25,5 inch scale. Might be interesting.
View attachment 544106
Almost bought one of those.... had one in my hands walking toward the counter a few times... but at the time I was getting too busy to play much and was also considering scaling down the collection.

Now I wish I had bought it.
 

mudface

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Personally if I had 8 digit disposable income I wouldn’t be in the market for a ‘Burst. I feel I could spend that money a little more productively... not necessarily on a 100 Norlins.... but maybe on a variety guitars.... including Danos....Fenders....Gretsch .....Martins...and other items like vintage analog mixing consoles and multitrack tape recorders.

But that’s just me.... I’m pretty familiar with what a ‘Burst can offer.... there are many ways to emulate that for less. Of course I’m thinking like a player and not someone looking for prestige object to put on display.....

;)
 

DBDM

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If I had eight digits disposable, I would strongly consider a burst. Also keep in mind that people who buy Bursts frequently know that you would not be wasting your money since the market for them will likely not drop (or not drop much) in the future--so you could, in reality, have both the same net worth and the guitar--it is an investment. I do not look at MY guitars as investments but Bursts can certainly fall into that category (I still think I am way positive on my guitar collection as is, but not planning on selling.)
 

eric ernest

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I know for an absolute fact that Gruhn's, Carters, and Rumble Seat Music in Nashville have all stocked and sold Norlins within the past year.
Does anyone not already know this? Almost ALL vintage dealers sell Norlins. Because it's "music city," Nashville dealers are all about VOLUME.

Walter and Christy probably sell more guitars in two weeks than I sell in a year.

My answer (opinion) is "No. They will simply stock and sell them".
This is in contrast to your earlier comment.


I think the continuing improvement of Asian made guitars has them scared. Not Norlins.
Huh?????? Continuing????

Almost all of the Asian stuff has been extremely solid for 15+ years....even the $99 Chinese stuff.

Light years ahead of entry guitars from the early 90's and back.
 

eric ernest

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I own four Norlin Black Customs. 71, 72, 74, 74. They are by far the best sounding Classic Rock Guitars I've ever heard.
The earlier 70's Customs seem to be consistently better than Standards. Again, 70's V's and Explorers are pretty consistently good. Less complicated and easier to get right.
 

eric ernest

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They're bashing them while quietly buying them up. I am convinced the dealers are behind it. They're FOS MF'ers.
If you think that....put your money where your mouth is....name names.

If you believe it, stand behind it...
 

msalama

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The earlier 70's Customs seem to be consistently better than Standards.
Well, the '73 Deluxe I currently own is a great guitar and it suits my playing style better than f.ex. one 50's LP I played years ago did. It's all got to do with the neck profile and I personally prefer slim and flat necks with low jumbos.

So which guitar is objectively better? Be damned if I know, so I'll say neither. Early Lesters are expensive collector pieces whereas Norlins are not, but TO ME, Norlins have more intrinsic net value. So as regards the hypotethical 8 digit disposable income, I'd actually buy 20 Norlins and a villa at Lake Como with all that moola :D
 

mudface

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One of my favorite quotes:

"An ounce of image is worth a pound of performance." -David Lee Roth
DLR is living proof of that.

100 pounds of image in a 1 pound bag.

Look at him now...... looks like Murphy’s Meth Lab went to town on him.

Should have took lessons.

(just kidding.... he did alright for large mouth dumbass)
 

msalama

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I digress, BUT...

C'mon guys, DLR is a comedian first and foremost, plus his, ehm, "singing" fits those old VH albums tonque-in-cheek perfectly. The first 3 records are classics not only because of EVH's groundbreaking guitar work, but because of all that raw-knuckled energy and spunk that just oozes out. Atomic Fookin' Punk!

Sammy Hagar though? Who's he? A distant cousin of Barely Manenough's perhaps? Cooopa-cocabananaaaaahhh...
 


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