The Moderne - Holy Grail of Vintage Guitars

pshupe

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Fired up the CNC machine tonight. I have to tweak some toolpaths but everything went pretty smooth.

I did the back first and even drilled 1/16" location holes for the control cavity cover.
image4.jpeg


Flipped it over and did the rest of the toolpaths. I really like this Korina.

image1.jpeg


IMG_0891.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

LPTDMSV

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Fired up the CNC machine tonight. I have to tweak some toolpaths but everything went pretty smooth.

I did the back first and even drilled 1/16" location holes for the control cavity cover.

Flipped it over and did the rest of the toolpaths. I really like this Korina.
Very impressive! Looks great.
 

LPTDMSV

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I'm not a big fan of the "Gumby" headstock, but the V, Futura, and LP would look out of place with the body curve.
Perhaps a fusion of the V with a curved lower side to draw the body shape to the headstock like the V?
Looking at Peter's new pictures, showing the body in isolation, emphasises an echo between the vee-notch in the Futura headstock and the vee-notch in the tail of the Moderne body. It would be a stronger echo if one side of the headstock was curved too, but it could potentially work as-is (and if anyone wants to see how that looks there's an example on pages 197-198 of the @voices book, see first post in this whole thread).

While wasting time on YouTube the other day, I found a video of Phil X playing a Moderne and he confirms that the Moderne balances well on the strap with the Gumby headstock. See also @Bill Hicklin 's comment https://www.mylespaul.com/threads/new-build-sneak-preview-the-concept-moderne.335158/post-7127451

Phil X 1982 Moderne demo
 
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pshupe

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Looks amazing. What kind of CNC setup do you have?
It's called a CANCAM Mini-Tron d23. 25" x 37"x 9 1/2" working area. I have developed quite a relationship with these guys and I have purchased or recommended 5 of these machines to friends and associates. Essentially it is a chinese built machine but the company I deal with is local and has quality control measures as well as does all the electronics. IMO this is the best solution if you want a turn-key worry free machine. I looked at most others and it was much cheaper than Laguna and on par with AVID but it's all together and ready to run. May even be a little cheaper because it has a built in controller. You do not need a separate computer to run it.

Here is a link to their site - CANCAM CNC

and a pic of my machine -
new_machine.jpg


I have added a vacuum pump since this picture was taken. I really like this machine and the company.

Cheers Peter.
 

dcomiskey

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Damn, that's nice! Wish that was more affordable for me.
 

pshupe

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Damn, that's nice! Wish that was more affordable for me.
I do not buy any equipment until I have the $$$ in my wood working account. I sell slabs I cut from trees and make charcuterie boards. The odd guitar here and there and run it like a small business. So I claim expenses, claim my sales, and always lose lots of $$$$ on paper because I spend more than I make. I started with a small hobby CNC machine and this is my third upgrade. The next will be a 4'x8' so I can flatten larger slabs and sell them for more $$$. Eventually I will retire into a fully stocked wood working business. I always get tool gift cards and any cash for Christmas or birthdays goes right into the wood working fund. I am lucky that my full time gig pays me enough to sock some of my disposable income into tools, as well as an accommodating spouse.

I think if you start with a small hobby machine, like a shapeoko, you will learn a lot. Find something cool to make that you can sell and save up for a larger machine. Etsy, Kijiji, and eBay can be some great places to sell stuff. Especially right now when most people are spending way more time at home on the internet shopping.

If you are interested in learning more, PM me and we can discuss. I can walk you through some of the things I have learned over the years.

Cheers Peter.
 

pshupe

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So onto fret boards. Vintage rule of 18 with cellulose nitrate inlays and curved fret slots. I punched out some dots from a small sheet of cellulose nitrate material.
IMG_0900.JPG



I cut the dot inalys first on the flat boards and glued in the dots. Then I radiused the board and cut it out and slotted. All on the CNC machine. Should take very little sanding to make a nice smooth surface.
IMG_0905.JPG



IMG_0907.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

LPTDMSV

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So onto fret boards. Vintage rule of 18 with cellulose nitrate inlays and curved fret slots. I punched out some dots from a small sheet of cellulose nitrate material.
View attachment 516771


I cut the dot inalys first on the flat boards and glued in the dots. Then I radiused the board and cut it out and slotted. All on the CNC machine. Should take very little sanding to make a nice smooth surface.
View attachment 516772


View attachment 516773

Cheers Peter.
Very impressive as ever, Peter! Please excuse my near-total ignorance of the CNC world, but what holds the fretboard on the worktable while it is being machined?
 

pshupe

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Very impressive as ever, Peter! Please excuse my near-total ignorance of the CNC world, but what holds the fretboard on the worktable while it is being machined?
CA glue essentially. Sometimes double sided tape. I put down painters tape on the spoilboard and the underside of the fret board then use CA glue or double sided tape. I do have a vacuum pump that could hold larger flat material down but go with the tape on fret boards.

You can see the blue tape beside the fret board. I actually touch off that surface and this machines the board to the exact thickness.

Cheers Peter.
 

guitartsar

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Amazing and very impressive project Peter! Have you already sourced all the hardware?
Looking forward to seeing the finished guitar.
 

pshupe

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Amazing and very impressive project Peter! Have you already sourced all the hardware?
Looking forward to seeing the finished guitar.
Check one page back. Post #63 and #65 The answer is pretty much yes. It could change as I am starting to stock pile vintage parts to mix and match a bit more depending on preferences. I'm building a bunch of vintage "ish" guitars so my parts tool box is getting quite full.
IMG_0909.JPG


I've got parts enough for a couple of Modernes, an Explorer, a 59 LP, and a 61 SG. then just a bunch of miscellaneous parts for about a dozen vintage spec guitars. Pots, caps, wiring, switches, jacks... etc

Cheers Peter.
 

voices

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I do not buy any equipment until I have the $$$ in my wood working account. I sell slabs I cut from trees and make charcuterie boards. The odd guitar here and there and run it like a small business. So I claim expenses, claim my sales, and always lose lots of $$$$ on paper because I spend more than I make. I started with a small hobby CNC machine and this is my third upgrade. The next will be a 4'x8' so I can flatten larger slabs and sell them for more $$$. Eventually I will retire into a fully stocked wood working business. I always get tool gift cards and any cash for Christmas or birthdays goes right into the wood working fund. I am lucky that my full time gig pays me enough to sock some of my disposable income into tools, as well as an accommodating spouse.

I think if you start with a small hobby machine, like a shapeoko, you will learn a lot. Find something cool to make that you can sell and save up for a larger machine. Etsy, Kijiji, and eBay can be some great places to sell stuff. Especially right now when most people are spending way more time at home on the internet shopping.

If you are interested in learning more, PM me and we can discuss. I can walk you through some of the things I have learned over the years.

Cheers Peter.
That shapeoko looks like you have to put it together. I'm wondering if that is in my faculties to accomplish.

What is your opinion of it?
 

Wood Butcher

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Hi Peter,

What tool are you using to punch the fret markers ? Ive searched google for 1/4" punch but cannot find anything suitable for mounting in a drill press here in the UK

thanks
 

pshupe

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I'm using a 1/4" leather punch. It works OK but I can only punch two and then clean out the dots. You can also just drill a 1/4" hole in a piece of steel and then use a 1/4" diameter rod and punch through the hole. You just want to make sure the rod has a nice sharp edge. I use my drill press for now but would like to use my fret press so I can get more pressure on it.

Cheers Peter.
 

voices

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I'm using a 1/4" leather punch. It works OK but I can only punch two and then clean out the dots. You can also just drill a 1/4" hole in a piece of steel and then use a 1/4" diameter rod and punch through the hole. You just want to make sure the rod has a nice sharp edge. I use my drill press for now but would like to use my fret press so I can get more pressure on it.

Cheers Peter.
I have a set of hole punches....when used in the drill press, they work on plastic im sure of that. not sure of pearl.
 

pshupe

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I have a set of hole punches....when used in the drill press, they work on plastic im sure of that. not sure of pearl.
Definitely not pearl. I CNC my pearl with a ridiculously small and equally expensive shell cutting bit.
IMG_6602.JPG IMG_6610.JPG IMG_6697.JPG
 

pshupe

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I think there is a CNC thread. It may be better to discuss the merits of different machines in there for all to share.

LINK

Cheers Peter.
 

pshupe

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Now the fret boards are done, for now, I will work on the necks. I have a few neck blanks mostly Honduran Mahogany. I still have to find a decent Korina neck blank. I think I might have to settle for a two piece laminated neck. I have a bunch of Korina cut for necks but it is pretty much quarter sawn so not good for what I want to do.
IMG_0675.JPG


I think I'll save these for Explorer necks. I'm going to try and pick up some flat sawn pieces this weekend. Here is my layout in CAD for my first process for the necks. Basically take a rectangular blank and cut some indexing holes, head stock angle, truss rod and anchor route, as well as neck angle to align with the body on this extra long tenon.
neck_for CNC.JPG


I use these drawings to create what represents my stock in Fusion and get ready to develop tool paths.
neck blank.JPG


Once I have the 3d model developed I can create the tool paths.
neck blank CAM.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 


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