The Moderne - Holy Grail of Vintage Guitars

pshupe

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I cut up and jointed and planed the two piece bodies. I've got one mahogany two piece and one korina two piece. Both planks I purchase were pretty well quarter sawn, so the body joins should be almost invisible. I've marked out the moderne body shape on all the bodies. I haven't glued up the two piece bodies yet.

Two piece bodies -
IMG_0689.JPG


one piece bodies -

IMG_0690.JPG


Cheers Peter,
 

moreles

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The grain on that one-piece Korina body falls beautifully relative to the area and shape of the body. Should be tastefully spectacular. Good luck. Thanks for offering this thread.
 

pshupe

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Yeah - I've got that one as well. I actually lent it to Tom Bartlett. I gotta get it back from him, or maybe I'll buy him one for Christmas. This is also a guitar on my build short list. I have the one piece korina blank already and lots of quartersawn Korina big enough for one piece necks. That is the nice thing about the Explorer. You can use 8/4 material and build a one piece neck.

Thanks for posting this.

Cheers Peter.
 

archey

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Did you decide on a headstock shape yet? I wonder what a Firebird style headstock would look like on it?
 

pshupe

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I'm building 3 or 4 of these. Two will have the Gumby head stock and the other one is up in the air yet. It doesn't really make a difference as the necks will probably be the same until you glue on the ears and cut the head stock shape. I'm a long way away from that but I should be pretty close to working on the bodies.

Cheers Peter.
 

LPTDMSV

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Yeah - I've got that one as well. I actually lent it to Tom Bartlett. I gotta get it back from him, or maybe I'll buy him one for Christmas. This is also a guitar on my build short list. I have the one piece korina blank already and lots of quartersawn Korina big enough for one piece necks. That is the nice thing about the Explorer. You can use 8/4 material and build a one piece neck.

Thanks for posting this.

Cheers Peter.
I'm expecting that you will have completed an immaculate full set of korina Modernistics before I am halfway through my own project! I'm learning so much from reading your build threads though, it's an unbelievable free resource when you (and Tom, and other similarly skilled people) document what you do.

The Ron L Wood books are great for i) visuals, lots of pictures of great Gibsons, who doesn't like that?, ii) building tips with lots of close-ups of routs, joints and other construction details and iii) history, stories about the development process that are more that what I knew before from Duchossoir, etc.
 

voices

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so i got some time off work and thought i would add to the thread in any way i can.

As Peter said...we are working together to make his build as authentic as can be- both in the way the prototype may have been built and the same with the 80's one.

I have taken multitudes of photos of mine and will post a few. i dont want to bog down the thread with files but if anyone wants them in emails, im happy to share.

We started off with drawing EVERYTHING out...to scale.
IMG_0644.jpg
IMG_0646.jpg
 

LPTDMSV

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so i got some time off work and thought i would add to the thread in any way i can.

As Peter said...we are working together to make his build as authentic as can be- both in the way the prototype may have been built and the same with the 80's one.

We started off with drawing EVERYTHING out...to scale.
Ah pencils, rulers and bits of paper! They still have their uses. If you are working together then it sounds like you are going to have the best of both worlds, CAD/CAM and the old-fashioned way too.
 

pshupe

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Ah pencils, rulers and bits of paper! They still have their uses. If you are working together then it sounds like you are going to have the best of both worlds, CAD/CAM and the old-fashioned way too.
Yep - going old school on this. If not for COVID I probably would've suggested that Ron ship me his Moderne and I would've laser scanned it. I could then create absolutely exact replication of the info. Probably wouldn't differ much from the final product but would save a ton of time in CAD design and development, as well as the 3d modeling inside the CAM program.

I should be finished with the creation of the final CAD / CAM files very soon and will be cutting some bodies shortly there after.

Cheers Peter.
 

LPTDMSV

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As I struggle to cut bits of plywood to make templates by hand right now, I can see some big advantages in CAD/CAM! Quicker and more accurate for sure - at least, once you've generated the model.
 

pshupe

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It's all about experience and work flow. Frankly, if I had not had experience with computers, CAD, and 3D modeling and access to all of the software. I bet it would've been quicker and much cheaper for me to just make MDF templates. Most of the builds I do have been one offs, so the advantage of CNC is somewhat lost. Although now I could easily machine any of those body types much quicker. The same could be said for making really good templates and fixtures.

I really enjoy the 3d modeling and CAD part of the build process. I started using AutoCAD back in 1987 and have used it and other software pretty much full time since. It's the way my brain thinks and how I understand how something is built. I am amazed at guitar builders who have never worked with computers, CAD, or CNC, jumping in and learning that process. I wouldn't deter someone from going that route but I would advise strongly to take a look at learning about computers and CAD prior to buying a CNC machine.

Cheers Peter.
 

redking

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Boy, the nostalgia factor of losing EVH has really got me thinking about the old Explorer shape a lot lately. Check out Johan's comparison of the Ibanez copies of the 3 famous futuristic models. Listen to 1:00 (Destroyer) vs. 1:17 (Futura) vs. 1:30 (Rocket Roll) - the explorer shape and the extra mass in the body - presumably behind the bridge - makes it so much thicker and meatier.


Hope you get to the explorer shape soon Peter :)
 

pshupe

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Boy, the nostalgia factor of losing EVH has really got me thinking about the old Explorer shape a lot lately. Check out Johan's comparison of the Ibanez copies of the 3 famous futuristic models. Listen to 1:00 (Destroyer) vs. 1:17 (Futura) vs. 1:30 (Rocket Roll) - the explorer shape and the extra mass in the body - presumably behind the bridge - makes it so much thicker and meatier.


Hope you get to the explorer shape soon Peter :)
It's funny you mention the Explorer as I have a body blank that I originally purchased for a Moderne but it was large enough for an Explorer, so I will be doing an Explorer as well.

Interesting that Ibanez named the copy of the Moderne a Futura. That was originally the name of the proto-type of the Explorer. I guess Gibson did not copyright that name? Although it didn't stop the lawsuits! Lol.

Cheers Peter.
 

LPTDMSV

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Interesting that Ibanez named the copy of the Moderne a Futura. That was originally the name of the proto-type of the Explorer. I guess Gibson did not copyright that name? Although it didn't stop the lawsuits! Lol.
The type of Grover tuners fitted to the Futura concept guitar, and to Rick Derringer's Explorer with the split-V headstock, were called "Futuras" (well according to some vintage part sellers on eBay and Reverb, anyway) - so maybe Gibson "borrowed" the name from them? Or perhaps people call them Futura tuners because they were on the Gibson Futura?? Who knows? It's a good 1950s "Jetsons" sort of word anyway :)

Grover Futura tuners
 

pshupe

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I'll have to chat with Tom and consult my other excellent book, shown closer to the top of this page regarding the tuners. I know Derringer's Explorer was modified quite a bit. I've seen pictures of his guitar with the Grover deluxe tuners with the pearloid buttons. Don't know if those would've been on the original 57 / 58 guitars. They seem to say 59 / 60 as far as issue dates.

Getting a little closer as far as the drawings. Just coordinating dimensional information with Ron from his measurements from his re-issue and extrapolating from what he, and others, know about those early modernistic guitars. Fun stuff but lots of work.


The most notable differences would be the extra long tenon and the wiring channel under the pick guard. From a lot of sources we have assumed that the "production" version of the Moderne would probably most resemble the construction of the Explorer.

Capture11.JPG


I will also be designing and building something closer to the proto-type design, which had a larger pickguard a switch like the Explorer and the output jack in the end of the body.

Capture12.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 
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