The Mad Hatter's Tea Party

79standard

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
11,720
Reaction score
79,840
On another note... A week or so ago, a bud that did luthier work and once worked for Gib out west gave us some stuff he had laying around... Husks and such.... One of em was a Sunrise guitar built by Tim Shaw (yep, him) and Pat Murphy.... They were above the old ProCo place way back... Cool guitar... My biz partner claimed it and is going to restore it...

Here are a couple of pics of a Sunrise (not the one we have)... Very cool and well made guitars....

View attachment 466605 View attachment 466606
.
That is a beautiful guitar!
I love the idea of LP shapes with comfort cutouts a la The Paul.

And HELLO, gang!

Man, you never know how addicted you are to FB and IG until you try to stay off them for one measly day.

It makes me even more grateful and glad to still have the Hatterite thread.
Cheers, fellow knights!
:cheers:
 

artis_xe

Christopher
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
23,830
Reaction score
107,901
g mornings and afternoons

Tried looking up Sunrise guitars and got pretty much nowhere. Excepting a music store - Hmmm.
Oh, that and links to a thread on some forum - mylespaul - ever heard of it? Sounds familiar.
my first was a Sunrise . a 73 ( ? ) Japanese copy of an LP . very heavy / not associated with the " real " Sunrise guitars . I gave it to a friend that gigged the hell out of it
 

cmh6122

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
7,246
Reaction score
37,536
G'day all.

First hot day over here today - close to 90°F. Supposed to drop down again to @60 come the weekend...
We are going to be in low to mid 90s till sometime next week and not expecting to get below 70 at night. It is 1100 hrs local and is already a muggy 88.
Have the A/C on and think Maddie has adjourned to our bed.

Hope Ma smiles on us all.
 

ehb

Chief Discombobulator
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
35,979
Reaction score
153,708
Not a ton of info on Sunrise Guitars as they only built somewhere over 100 of em before they went south....

Well built though.....very well built....
 

cmh6122

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
7,246
Reaction score
37,536
The UPS guy brought my new thermostat this after. Wish it could of been a swap without having to rewire, but at least the wall anchors were in the same place. There were only 5 wires to hook up though the harness coming out the wall had three wires that had been left unused.

At least the appropriate wires still went to like marked terminals, but suppose they could not allow me to reuse the base because.... oh who the fuck knows why. Guess that is why corporate 'merika has been allowed to stop supporting its' products after 7 years.

Could of been worse. They might have decided to change the configuration of the base mounting section.
Did not get electrocuted or ruin anything, and all function are operating exactly as prescribed. Even have the A/C portion programmed; I'll do the heat programs when it becomes necessary.

Hope Ma smiles on us all.
 

Thumpalumpacus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
76,197
Reaction score
187,622
Damaged the saddle on my acoustic trying to remove it for filing to lower the action. Previous owner apparently glued it in. Hmph.

On the assumption that it's superglue, I'll try removing it with nail-polish remover. Bone replacement is on order. Hmph.
 

Thumpalumpacus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
76,197
Reaction score
187,622
:facepalm:

Never know what you're going to find in previously owned stuff.

I hope the nail-polish remover does the job.
I hope that at worst even if it isn't superglue holding the saddle in, it'll dissolve the plastic and let me install the bone I've got on order.

ETA: if any of y'alls have an opinion pro or con on that approach I'm all ears, never had to do this before.
 
Last edited:

artis_xe

Christopher
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
23,830
Reaction score
107,901
g mornings and afternoons


I hope that at worst even if it isn't superglue holding the saddle in, it'll dissolve the plastic and let me install the bone I've got on order.

ETA: if any of y'alls have an opinion pro or con on that approach I'm all ears, never had to do this before.
I would be nervous about using a solvent on __ I'm guessing that the bridge is rosewood or ebony . the acetone in the nail polish could dry the natural oils in the wood . my approach would be to file / scrape / sand the area
 

Thumpalumpacus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
76,197
Reaction score
187,622
g mornings and afternoons




I would be nervous about using a solvent on __ I'm guessing that the bridge is rosewood or ebony . the acetone in the nail polish could dry the natural oils in the wood . my approach would be to file / scrape / sand the area
Getting a file in the slot without tearing the wood up, though ...
 

artis_xe

Christopher
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
23,830
Reaction score
107,901
Getting a file in the slot without tearing the wood up, though ...
tricky / delicate procedure , if you don't have mini files . there's always exacto blades __ or even snadpaper wrapped around the edge of a butter knife

I've had a couple of used guitars where the previous owner used glue ( for whatever reason ) in the bridge or nut . pain in the ass to clean up what I'm guessing was super CA glue
 

BBD

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2017
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
27,311
Damaged the saddle on my acoustic trying to remove it for filing to lower the action. Previous owner apparently glued it in. Hmph.
Apparently, many are factory glued (including Martins) with a synthetic (eg. superglue-like) adhesive. I would *strongly* advise you take this to a luthier. My mate Brian the luthier is like a phucking broken record on this: "why do people not just bring me stuff instead of trying to do it themselves? Aargh!". Honestly. That's him.
 

Thumpalumpacus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
76,197
Reaction score
187,622
Apparently, many are factory glued (including Martins) with a synthetic (eg. superglue-like) adhesive. I would *strongly* advise you take this to a luthier. My mate Brian the luthier is like a phucking broken record on this: "why do people not just bring me stuff instead of trying to do it themselves? Aargh!". Honestly. That's him.
This is a late 80s Yamaha FG450. I owned a 450SA from the same era a few years back (same model, blingier). I've also done setups on a couple of Yammies for customers. Yamaha doesn't glue their saddles.

I'm going to do this myself because 1) the charge for a luthier in Austin for this job is probably close to what I paid for the guitar ($150), and 2) the guitar being inexpensive means it's a good vehicle to teach myself these skills without any $300 file-strokes. I not only do tech work on my own guitars, but make extra money providing some services for other local players. This will be one more thing I can offer my customers if I manage the learning process right.

I think I'll go with the acetone first, and then try filing if that doesn't work. Wood can be rehydrated very simply, and that approach carries less risk of disfiguring the guitar.

A mini rotary abrasion tool in skilled hands might do the trick. See 'luthier' above...
I've thought about this approach as well. A Dremel with a small jig and a little armor for the top could do the trick.
 
Last edited:

BBD

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2017
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
27,311
I'm going to do this myself because 1) the charge for a luthier in Austin for this job is probably close to what I paid for the guitar ($150) and 2) the guitar being inexpensive means it's a good vehicle to teach myself these skills without any $300 file-strokes. I not only do tech work on my own guitars, but make extra money providing some services for other local players. This will be one more thing I can offer my customers if I manage the learning process right.
That's fair enough. I do the tech work on my guitars and learned the same way, so I have to agree with you :laugh2:
 




Top