The Mad Hatter's Tea Party

Gooner

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The government *could* have chosen to act on medical advice. It didn't. That is the issue. You are deflecting again, which answers my previous question.
I was under the impression that the government strategy was based on advice from the Chief Medical Officer and the Chief Science Officer. The CMO is one of England’s foremost epidemiologists – which means he is considered an authority identifying patterns of infection and researching new diseases. He has experience of tackling a virus outbreak when he played a leading role advising on the UK response to the Ebola epidemic in 2014 as chief scientific adviser to the Department for International Development. The CSO is similarly qualified for his role too.
So whose "medical" advice would you prefer the government to follow?
 

Thumpalumpacus

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Sorry about your loss, @79standard.

People here in Hill Country are finally starting to take this seriously. I'll be going out tomorrow for the second shopping trip I've made since the panic began a few weeks back. I'm low on meat in the freezer, would like more fresh vegetables, and though I've got a few weeks of wipe left, I'll pick some up if it's available. Fortunately I stay stocked on stuff so we've wanted for nothing, really.

:cheers:

I'm all for cooking and it is never too late to learn. I was lucky - my dad taught me the basics when I was a kid and I went on from there. I've always done the cooking - my wife can cook, but doesn't unless she wants to. It was pretty unusual for men of my dad's generation to cook, unless professionally, but he was really very solid. He enjoyed it, and taught himself to do it well. And he made a point of teaching me, for which I'm grateful, especially now.
When I was eight or so, I saw my dad over the stove cooking, so gave him a little business about "woman's work" etc. He put the ladle down, looked at me, and said, "I ain't got any respect for a man who can't feed hisself." Wise words I took to heart.
 

sliding tom

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We ate next door's dog for lunch. It wasn't very nice. Even Marco would have struggled with it.
Isn't there a phrase in english that says "Dom eats dog"? :hmm:


Thanks, D.

And niters, all.

Runny nose, sneezing, and generally feeling like warmed-over death.
Let's hope it's just a cold, eh?
Fingers crossed for you, Tim! :shock:


Good Morning folkses! :wave:
 

Phil47uk

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@John Vasco

John, you mentioned you had your grandson living with you. Is that due to the isolation measures or do you mean permanently?
Don't worry about replying to that one in here if it's a personal matter.

On a lighter note, I trust you have stocked up well on potatoes..:laugh2:
 

ehb

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Morning all, afternoon Tom... Hope all are keeping welll....

As far as cooking, my dad was a mess sgt before WWII and built the first five mess halls at the base near me... I was indoctrinated to cooking early on... Loved it when he cooked breakfast especially. His scrambled eggs were unreal. He alwasy said you fold them as they cook, not scramble em....

Well, played fretless bass last night.... That was fun.... Been a while since I pulled out the slick neck Jazz... Loads of fun...especially when I transitioned back to frets instead of fretspace so pitch is correct... Plus, you MUST make the full stretch on fretless.... You're not cheating the finger stretch by playing in fretspace, you gotta stretch fingers the full distance, which is tougher than it sounds. Works them fangers...

Like slide guitar, You can suck real bad real quick like on 'slide bass'... Fun.... Tonez out of that Jazz that ain't coming out of my fretted Jazz basses... Pretty cool.... You either listen or get hit in the head when something is thrown at you for your dumb ass not even being IN a key signature known to man much less on any tuning standard on this planet....

Gotta make a grocery store run in a bit... In & out and back to the house...
 

cmh6122

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G'day all.

Another lovely day on tap here in flyover country.

Two weeks ago a handful of cases in one county today 300+ well scattered. Wonder how long the hinterlands will be spared.

Sounds fun Ed. Fretless is my favorite bass sound.

Maddie is lobbying to head out.

Hope Ma smiles soon.
 

BBD

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So whose "medical" advice would you prefer the government to follow?
It's not at all clear that UK government *did* follow the advice given by its own advisors. What we do know -for a fact - is that it did nothing for crucial weeks in January and February, when contact tracing and quarantine should have been established. It inexplicably then delayed lockdown against the advice of the WHO (you wanted medical expertise, surely this qualifies?) and failed to instruct - not advise - pub, restaurant, club, non-essential shop closures and institute non-essential travel ban. It has still failed to institute anything remotely approaching a volume testing regime. The government is also responsible for a general failure to prepare for what was known to be the number one national emergency risk - pandemic - and so we are woefully undersupplied with protective clothing for doctors and nurses, not to mention ICU capacity because of a decade of government underfunding of an already struggling NHS.

The UK response has been a complete and total botch, seasoned with bizarre delays right from it's dangerously belated outset. Why the hell anyone would pretend otherwise is a complete mystery unless they are simply a Tory partisan.
 

Mindfrigg

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Morning all, afternoon Tom... Hope all are keeping welll....

As far as cooking, my dad was a mess sgt before WWII and built the first five mess halls at the base near me... I was indoctrinated to cooking early on... Loved it when he cooked breakfast especially. His scrambled eggs were unreal. He alwasy said you fold them as they cook, not scramble em....

Well, played fretless bass last night.... That was fun.... Been a while since I pulled out the slick neck Jazz... Loads of fun...especially when I transitioned back to frets instead of fretspace so pitch is correct... Plus, you MUST make the full stretch on fretless.... You're not cheating the finger stretch by playing in fretspace, you gotta stretch fingers the full distance, which is tougher than it sounds. Works them fangers...

Like slide guitar, You can suck real bad real quick like on 'slide bass'... Fun.... Tonez out of that Jazz that ain't coming out of my fretted Jazz basses... Pretty cool.... You either listen or get hit in the head when something is thrown at you for your dumb ass not even being IN a key signature known to man much less on any tuning standard on this planet....

Gotta make a grocery store run in a bit... In & out and back to the house...
I'm merely an adequate cook. Although I've had a few notable successes when winging it. Made a coffee cake from whatever-the-hell was in the cupboard once that is still lengendary. The "secret" ingredient being blackstrap molasses. It's got a strong flavor that I mitigated with brown sugar. Have no clue as to how to replicate it since. My sole claim to fame in the kitchen now is my adeptness at microwaving scrambled eggs without creating a souffle'. :laugh2:

I too was the breakfast guy around here as most of our marriage Melinda didn't "do" breakfast. Didn't eat it...didn't make it. I didn't mind as splitting the duties with four kids was necessary to stay sane and keep a marriage from disintegrating. :laugh2:
Cooking for the troops (x4) before school for umpteen years before going to work burnt me out on cooking. Pleasing four cranky kids at 6 am was challenging to say the least. Nobody ever wanted the same thing, but too bad. My worst offense was a big pot of oatmeal. Had cream, butter...but went to the cupboard for sweetener...no honey...no sugar...nothing. And me with a vat of hot and slowly stiffening oatmeal and 15 minutes til the bus. Dug around and came up with a container of GREEN confectioner's sugar left over from St. Patty's day shamrock cookies. "Right. Let's do this thang".

Served the green goop up efficiently. The wretching, complaints and howling commenced. They refused to touch it. Tasted fine but the..um..."plating" was not to their liking. Somehow a pat of unsalted butter on a pile of green glop wasn't appealing. :shock:

I have to admit it wasn't exactly esthetically pleasing. The troops went to battle with stomachs a'growlin' that day. A day that will live in infamy. :laugh2:

I'll make a pot of three bean soup occasionally. Of course Melinda despises beans or lentils and won't touch them. I make my own lunches but rarely anything fancy. Just can't get jazzed about cooking anymore. Luckily Melinda is a fine chef and enjoys cooking.
 

BBD

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When I was eight or so, I saw my dad over the stove cooking, so gave him a little business about "woman's work" etc. He put the ladle down, looked at me, and said, "I ain't got any respect for a man who can't feed hisself." Wise words I took to heart.
Almost exactly what my father said to me. Seriously.

Runny nose, sneezing, and generally feeling like warmed-over death.
Let's hope it's just a cold, eh?
I hope so too mate.

Nice find this afternoon.
Wow. Haven't seen that stuff in nearly four weeks. Or soap, or toilet roll. I haven't had a serious look recently - will go to big Tesco next week maybe. Obviously trying to avoid the big stores.
 

Mindfrigg

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Thanks, D.

And niters, all.

Runny nose, sneezing, and generally feeling like warmed-over death.
Let's hope it's just a cold, eh?
Doesn't sound like you-know-what. As I understand it headache, sore throat, fever and dry cough are the first signs. Pretty sure runny nose and sneezes aren't indicative of it. Fingers crossed but keep monitoring your temp. It's allergy season and I'm feeling a little scratchy sore throat myself due to that I'm sure.
 

BBD

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Cooking for the troops (x4) before school for umpteen years before going to work burnt me out on cooking. Pleasing four cranky kids at 6 am was challenging to say the least.
Yes, drudgework cookery - as so much of it is - is a million miles away from the fun stuff. And I get really fed up with it too, on occasion. The thought of at least three months of two meals a day (Heidi and the little lad sort out their own meagre breakfast as I don't eat one) is a bit daunting, really. Especially as I have no real confidence in the food supply here in the UK.
 

Mindfrigg

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Almost exactly what my father said to me. Seriously.



I hope so too mate.



Wow. Haven't seen that stuff in nearly four weeks. Or soap, or toilet roll. I haven't had a serious look recently - will go to big Tesco next week maybe. Obviously trying to avoid the big stores.
My son managed to score a gallon of isopropyl alcohol online for 30 bucks...which seems outrageous to me, considering it's normally around a dollar for two pints. He's making his own. He brought us about 300 dollars worth of groceries the other day so I gave him several bottles of homemade sanitizer spiked with tea tree oil and/or lavender. My wife scoffed at the tea tree but just the other day I saw an epidemiologist on tv that does the very same. She pointed out the strong odor reminded her if she was about to touch her face. Plus it's antibacterial.
 

BBD

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Falls into the category of "thankless jobs".
Indeed it does.

He brought us about 300 dollars worth of groceries the other day
We can't really do that. There are quotas in force on what you can buy from the supermarkets in order to quell panic hoarding. This has created the situation where:

- There is still no soap, handwash, toilet paper etc (and much else besides, including eggs) on the shelves
- Everyone has to go shopping more often, increasing the infection risk
- It is very difficult to shop for others - elderly; self-isolating symptomatics - because you need 'your' quota for your family. Unless you go out again the next day, increasing the infection risk
 

Phil47uk

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Almost exactly what my father said to me. Seriously.



I hope so too mate.



Wow. Haven't seen that stuff in nearly four weeks. Or soap, or toilet roll. I haven't had a serious look recently - will go to big Tesco next week maybe. Obviously trying to avoid the big stores.
Just bought two 300 ml liquid soap dispensers and two 300 ml hand gel dispensers which is enough to fill those small bottles at least five or six times and seeing as we only use that hand gel when out they should last a few months.
I've keep the small bottles in the cars because I've used them in academies long before all this kicked in.
Four more toilet rolls, two lots of kitchen towel, those two 300ml hand gels and a couple of anti-bac surface cleanser spray bottles.
Milk, bread, pasta, basmati rice. The only thing we couldn't get was tinned tomatoes , so I'll make alternative pasta sauces although if necessary we do have stacks of fresh vine tomatoes.
That was around a £140 shop but at least we've got enough food and essentials to last us for a couple of weeks.
Any small items we can easily pick up from the village shop.
Judging from horror stories I've heard from friends who live in towns and cities I think we are incredibly lucky to live where we do and to have a nice large back garden to sit and relax in.
 

Mindfrigg

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Indeed it does.



We can't really do that. There are quotas in force on what you can buy from the supermarkets in order to quell panic hoarding. This has created the situation where:

- There is still no soap, handwash, toilet paper etc (and much else besides, including eggs) on the shelves
- Everyone has to go shopping more often, increasing the infection risk
- It is very difficult to shop for others - elderly; self-isolating symptomatics - because you need 'your' quota for your family. Unless you go out again the next day, increasing the infection risk
Here, we order online, we're limited to two of certain items. Many stores are limiting quantities of certain items. He shopped for us in "the big city" and I'm guessing went to a few different stores. He insisted on buying them for us because he's worried about us and like most of us feels helpless and it's all he can do. We're assured there is no supply problem but folks still insist on hoarding the staples like milk, meat, eggs, and sanitizing material...and of course tp.
. Not to mention neither he nor I trust the fed's handling of this, or the disinformation and blowing of sunshine up our asses about how "they got this". The evidence is to the contrary. We may start losing folks on the frontlines of medicine and supply (because of ill preparedness and lack of the most basic supplies )and then, yep...

First responders are now washing and reusing MASKS and wearing GARBAGE bags as sanitary dress.

That being said, our governor is doing a great job and those he's delegating responsibility to as well. We have only a quarter of the cases as our neighbor to the south because of the proactive response. He explains daily to the public about blunting the curve and how to do it. Cases are growing but at a much slower rate than other states.
 
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